1904 in South Africa

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1904 in South Africa
1901 1902 1903 « 1904 » 1905 1906 1907

List of years in South Africa

The following lists events that happened during 1904 in South Africa.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

February
June
  • 22 – The first of 62,000 Chinese labourers arrive in South Africa to relieve the shortage of unskilled mine workers.
Unknown date
  • The Social Democratic Federation (SDF) is established in Cape Town.

Births[edit]

  • 16 February – Philip Rabinowitz, South African record breaking sprinter. (d. 2008)

Deaths[edit]

Railways[edit]

Railway lines opened[edit]

  • 1 February – Cape Western – Maitland to Ottery, 7 miles (11.3 kilometres).[1]
  • 1 March – Cape Midland – Le Roux to Oudtshoorn, 16 miles 41 chains (26.6 kilometres).[2]
  • 7 June – Cape Western – Paarl to Franschhoek, 17 miles 10 chains (27.6 kilometres).[2]
  • 15 June – Free State – Thaba 'Nchu to Modderpoort, 45 miles 73 chains (73.9 kilometres).[1]
  • 17 August – Cape Eastern – Indwe to Xalanga, 31 miles 3 chains (50.0 kilometres).[2]
  • 1 September – Free State – Hamilton to Tempe, 4 miles (6.4 kilometres).[1]
  • 7 September – Cape Eastern – Amabele to Komga, 27 miles (43.5 kilometres).[2]
  • 17 October – Cape Eastern – Middledrift to Adelaide, 56 miles 64 chains (91.4 kilometres).[2]
  • 3 November – Natal – Pietermaritzburg to Elandskop, 35 miles 39 chains (57.1 kilometres).[1]
  • December – Cape Western – Artois to Ceres Road, 4 miles 38 chains (7.2 kilometres).[1]
  • 15 December – Transvaal – Langlaagte to Vereeniging, 44 miles 56 chains (71.9 kilometres).[1]

Locomotives[edit]

Cape
Natal
  • Two new Cape gauge locomotive types enter service on the Natal Government Railways (NGR):
    • Twenty-five Class E 4-8-2 Mountain type tank locomotives. In 1912 they will become the Class G on the SAR.[3][7]
    • Fifty Class B 4-8-0 Mastodon type mainline steam locomotives. In 1912 they will be designated Class 1 on the SAR.[3][4]
  • The Natal Harbours Department places a single 0-6-0 saddle-tank locomotive named Sir Albert in service as dock shunter in Durban Harbour.[8]
Transvaal

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Statement Showing, in Chronological Order, the Date of Opening and the Mileage of Each Section of Railway, Statement No. 19, p. 185, ref. no. 200954-13
  2. ^ a b c d e Report for year ending 31 December 1909, Cape Government Railways, Section VIII - Dates of Opening and the Length of the different Sections in the Cape Colony, from the Year 1873 to 31st December, 1909.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Holland, D.F. (1971). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 1: 1859–1910 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. pp. 54, 56, 64–67, 71–72, 99–101, 127–129. ISBN 978-0-7153-5382-0. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Paxton, Leith; Bourne, David (1985). Locomotives of the South African Railways (1st ed.). Cape Town: Struik. pp. 10–11, 32, 34–35, 39, 44, 48–49, 51–52, 54, 56, 84, 104, 113. ISBN 0869772112. 
  5. ^ Classification of S.A.R. Engines with Renumbering Lists, issued by the Chief Mechanical Engineer’s Office, Pretoria, January 1912, pp. 9, 12, 15, 36 (Reprinted in April 1987 by SATS Museum, R.3125-6/9/11-1000)
  6. ^ Bagshawe, Peter (2012). Locomotives of the Namaqualand Railway and Copper Mines (1st ed.). Stenvalls. pp. 25–27, 40. ISBN 978-91-7266-179-0. 
  7. ^ South African Railways and Harbours Locomotive Diagram Book, 2’0” & 3’6” Gauge Steam Locomotives, 15 August 1941, pp21 & 21A, as amended
  8. ^ a b Holland, D. F. (1972). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 2: 1910-1955 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. pp. 110, 130–131, 140. ISBN 978-0-7153-5427-8.