1909 Alekhin

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1909 Alekhin
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Zhuravleva
Discovery site CrAO - Nauchnyj
Discovery date 4 September 1972
Designations
MPC designation 1909 Alekhin
Named after
Alexander Alekhine
(chess grandmaster)[2]
1972 RW2 · 1926 GU
1930 KF · 1930 KM
1934 NZ · 1934 OC
1941 FJ · 1960 FD
1969 UU · 1971 DL
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 89.91 yr (32841 days)
Aphelion 2.9699 AU (444.29 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8749 AU (280.48 Gm)
2.4224 AU (362.39 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.22602
3.77 yr (1377.1 d)
256.98°
0° 15m 41.112s / day
Inclination 1.7948°
227.50°
5.7072°
Earth MOID 0.863076 AU (129.1143 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.02662 AU (303.178 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.477
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 17.42±1.5 km (IRAS: 15)
18.59±0.37 km[4]
18.847±0.129 km[5]
15.45±9.22 km[6]
17.34 km (derived)[3]
Mean radius
8.71 ± 0.75 km
148.6 h (6.19 d)[1][7]
148.2252±0.6228 h[8]
0.0700 ± 0.014 (IRAS: 15) [1]
0.062±0.003[4]
0.0460±0.0018[5]
0.067±0.083[6]
0.0488 (derived)[3]
S[3]
12.8[1]

1909 Alekhin, provisional designation 1972 RW2, is a stony asteroid and slow rotator from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 17 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Russian–Ukrainian female astronomer Lyudmila Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj, on 4 September 1972.[9]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.9–3.0 AU once every 3 years and 9 months (1,377 days). It has a notably slow rotation period of about 148 hours.[7][8] Its orbit – tilted by 2 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic – shows a significant eccentricity of 0.23. Based on the surveys carried out by Akari, WISE/NEOWISE, its albedo is between 0.05 and 0.07.[4][5][6]

The asteroid is scheduled to occlude a 9.1 magnitude star in the Leo constellation on 30 November 2008, dimming the magnitude of both heavenly bodies for a maximum duration of 0.6 seconds. Astronomers had, as of March 2008, not predicted an optimal trajectory for the event.[10] Lyudmila Zhuravleva is ranked number 43 in Harvard's ranking of those who discovered minor planets. She discovered 200 minor planets, thirteen of which were co-discoveries, between 1972 and 1992.[11]

The minor planet was named in honour of Russian-born Alexander Alekhine (1892–1946), chess grandmaster, considered one of the greatest chess players ever.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1909 Alekhin (1972 RW2)" (2015-10-17 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1909) Alekhin. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 153. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1909) Alekhin". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Dymock, Roger (October 2009). "Lightcurve and Absolute Magnitude of 1909 Alekhin". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (4): 182–183. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36..182D. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041free to read. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  9. ^ "1909 Alekhin (1972 RW2)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 November 2015. 
  10. ^ Preston, Steve (2007-05-14). "IOTA/IOTA-ES occultation update for (1909) Alekhin / TYC 0264-00685-1 event on 2008 Nov 30, 06:05 UT". asteroidocculatation.com. Retrieved 2008-03-09. [dead link]
  11. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers". International Astronomical Union, Minor Planet Center. 2008-02-21. Archived from the original on 5 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-09. 

External links[edit]