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1921 Centre Praying Colonels football team

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1921 Centre Praying Colonels football
Centrecollegec6h0.jpg
Southern champion
Conference Independent
1921 record 10–1
Head coach Charley Moran
Assistant coach Chief Myers
Assistant coach Tiny Thornill
Offensive scheme Single wing
Captain Norris Armstrong
Home stadium Cheek Field
Uniform
20scentreuniform.png
Seasons
← 1920
1922 →

The 1921 Centre Praying Colonels football team represented Centre College of Danville, Kentucky in the 1921 college football season. Led by coach Charley Moran, the Praying Colonels compiled a 10–1 record, scoring 334 points while allowing 28 points (282 and 6 in regular season play).

The Colonels' victory in its game versus Harvard is regarded as one of the greatest upsets in college football history.[1][2] Centre also played in two postseason bowl games after the season. The Colonels defeated Arizona 38–0 in the San Diego East-West Christmas Classic before losing to Texas A&M in an upset at the Dixie Classic (a precursor to the modern Cotton Bowl Classic), a game which originated the Aggies' 12th man tradition.

The Colonels' captain was "Army" Armstrong. Several players received postseason recognition. End Red Roberts was a first-team Walter Camp All-America selection, a rarity for a player in the South, and quarterback Bo McMillin made Camp's second team and was recognized as consensus All-American. McMillin was an inaugural inductee into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Before the season[edit]

Centre College was a small college in Danville, Kentucky. From 1917 to 1924, Centre compiled a 57–8 record while playing against some of the best teams in the nation.[3] The 1919 team first brought the Praying Colonels to national attention.[4] In 1921, the school's student body numbered just 274.[5]

The Colonels had closed the 1920 season by convincingly routing Texas Christian (TCU) in the Fort Worth Classic, 63–7.[6] This season they started their schedule with much stronger competition than the previous year. Several publications relay: "In 1920, the slogan of Centre College was "Score"...In 1921 Centre changed the "Score" slogan to "Hold 'Em".[7][5]

Coach Charley Moran used a single wing system like his former mentor Pop Warner.[8] Tiny Thornill, a former Pitt star under Warner, and future Stanford head coach, assisted as line coach.[9]

In 1921, football used a one-platoon system, with players featuring on both offense, defense, and special teams. Center Red Weaver, who had posted record numbers for placekicking extra points,[10] graduated and was replaced with Ed Kubale.[11]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 1 Clemson Cheek Field • Danville, KY W 14–0   3,000
October 8 VPI* Cheek Field • Danville, KY W 14–0   -
October 15 at Xavier* Cincinnati, OH W 28–6   -
October 22 at Transylvania Thomas Field • Lexington, KY W 98–0   -
October 29 at Harvard* Harvard StadiumAllston, MA (C6H0) W 6–0   43,000
November 5 Kentucky Cheek Field • Danville, KY W 55–0   -
November 12 at Auburn Rickwood FieldBirmingham, AL W 21–0   -
November 19 vs. Washington and Lee* Eclipse ParkLouisville, KY W 25–0   -
November 24 at Tulane Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA W 21–0   8,000
December 26 vs. Arizona* Balboa StadiumSan Diego, CA (Christmas Classic) W 38–0   -
January 2, 1922 vs. Texas A&M* Fair Park Stadium • Dallas, TX (Dixie Classic) L 22–14   20,000
*Non-conference game.

[12]

Season summary[edit]

Week 1: Clemson[edit]

Week 1: Clemson at Centre
1 2 3 4 Total
Clemson 0 0 0 0 0
Centre 0 7 7 0 14
  • Date: October 1
  • Location: Cheek Field
    Danville, KY
  • Game attendance: 3,000
  • Referee: Lambert (Ohio State)

Sources:[13]

Centre opened the season with a 14–0 victory over the Clemson Tigers. A 7-yard run behind left tackle from Tom Bartlett got the first touchdown. McMillin skirted right end for the game's other score.[13]

The starting lineup was: Bradley (left end), Roberts (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (center), Cregor (right guard), James (right tackle), Gordy (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Bartlett (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[13]

Week 2: VPI[edit]

Week 2: VPI at Centre
1 2 3 4 Total
VPI 0 0 0 0 0
Centre 0 0 0 14 14
  • Date: October 8
  • Location: Cheek Field
    Danville, KY
  • Referee: Marty (Kenyon)

Sources:[14]

The next week was a 14–0 victory over VPI. Centre scored both touchdowns in the final quarter.[14] They were scored in rapid succession by Tanner and Armstrong.[14]

The starting lineup was: Bradley (left end), Roberts (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (center), Cregor (right guard), James (right tackle), Gordy (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Bartlett (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[14]

Week 3: at Saint Xavier[edit]

Week 3: Centre at Saint Xavier
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 7 0 7 14 28
St. Xavier 6 0 0 0 6

Sources:[15]

Next was a 28–6 victory over Saint Xavier (now Xavier University) of Cincinnati. This game marked the only time during the regular season that Centre gave up any points to an opponent.[12]

Snoddy, holding a Centre blanket the day before beating Harvard.

The Saints outplayed the Colonels in the first half. Herb Davis recovered a fumble for a touchdown. "Trembling from excitement, Noppenerger missed the goal."[15]

"McMillin, Covington and Armstrong carried the ball 46 yards to the one-foot line on three plays" before Tanner went over and kicked goal for the lead.[15] In the third quarter, Thomasson bucked it over on runs of 9 and 1 yard.[15] Davis once broke free, and with only Tanner to pass, had Tanner knife through three blockers to push him out of bounds.[15] "The Colonels then showed their greatest offense when in five plays they took the ball 72 yards for a touchdown."[15] Later, McMillin got the last touchdown.[15]

The starting lineup was: Gordy (left end), Roberts (left tackle), Gibson (left guard), Kubale (center), Cregor (right guard), James (right tackle), Snoddy (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Bartlett (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[15]

Week 4: at Transylvania[edit]

Week 4: Centre at Transylvania
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 26 34 28 10 98
Transylvania 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[16]

In the fourth week of play, Centre easily defeated Transylvania by the score of 98–0.[16] According to Spalding's Football Guide, McMillin ran back a kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown.[17]

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (center), Shedoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Thomasson (fullback).[16]

Week 5: at Harvard[edit]

Week 5: Centre at Harvard
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 0 0 6 0 6
Harvard 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[18]

On October 29, 1921 Centre met Harvard University, a team that had never lost to a team outside the East, and had not lost a game since 1918. It was coming off a victory in the 1920 Rose Bowl after an undefeated national championship season in 1919 - the school's fourth national championship in the prior ten years.[19]

Coming into the Centre game, Harvard was also undefeated and unscored upon in the 1920 season.[19] Some reports recall the players wearing work clothes to cultivate the image of the underdog.[20] Coach Moran had Happy Chandler, who was at Harvard Law School, scout the Harvard team and take copious notes.[21]

The Colonels in Danville, fresh off the defeat of Harvard.

After a scoreless half, early in the third quarter Red Roberts told Bo McMillin "it's time to score, ride my hump" and McMillin ran for a 32-yard touchdown.[22] He dodged three of Harvard's secondary.[23] Harvard coach Bob Fisher said after the game: "In Bo McMillin Centre has a man who is probably the hardest in the country to stop."[18]

McMillin about to score.

All around Danville students painted the "impossible formula" of C6H0.[24] The campus post office has the last vestige of this on a side wall.[25] Tulane coach Clark Shaughnessy later wrote the win "first awoke the nation to the possibilities of Southern football."[26] In 1950, the Associated Press named C6H0 the greatest sports upset of the first half of the 20th century.[27] In 2005, The New York Times called it "arguably the upset of the century in college football."[28] In 2006, ESPN named it the third-biggest upset in the 138-year history of college football.[1] On the return celebration in Danville on Monday, Governor Edwin P. Morrow remarked "I'd rather be Bo McMillin this moment than the Governor of Kentucky."[29]

The starting lineup against Harvard was: James (left end), Moody (left tackle), Shadown (left guard), Kubale (center), Jones (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), Roberts (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Armstrong (left halfback), Snoddy (right halfback), and Bartlett (fullback)[18]

Week 6: Kentucky[edit]

Week 6: Kentucky at Centre
1 2 3 4 Total
Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0
Centre 7 13 21 14 55
  • Date: November 4
  • Location: Cheek Field
    Danville, KY
  • Referee: Henry (Kenyon)

Sources:[30]

Centre then defeated Kentucky 55–0. McMillin had three touchdowns.[30] In the middle of the second quarter, up 7–0, McMillin skirted left end and cut back across the field for a 49-yard touchdown. Herb Covington next had a 39-yard touchdown. In the fourth, a 30-yard pass to Roberts was followed shortly by a 35-yard pass to Hennie Lemon for the touchdown.[30] Bobby Lavin starred for the Wildcats.[30]

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Bartlett (fullback).[30]

Week 7: at Auburn[edit]

Week 7: Centre at Auburn
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 7 7 0 7 21
Auburn 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[31]

In the seventh week of play Centre defeated Auburn 21–0. Roberts scored the first two touchdowns.[31] Ed Sherling had Auburn's best run of the day around left tackle for 15 yards, but McMillin tackled him and forced a fumble, recovered by Armstrong putting Centre in striking distance for the second touchdown.[31] McMillin scored the third touchdown in the fourth quarter.[31] "There is no doubt that we were outclassed" said Auburn coach Mike Donahue.[32]

Army Armstrong

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (Center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[31]

Week 8: vs. Washington & Lee[edit]

Week 8: Washington & Lee vs. Centre
1 2 3 4 Total
W&L 0 0 0 0 0
Centre 0 13 6 6 25

Sources:[33]

Washington & Lee was then defeated 25–0 in the mud in Louisville. McMillin threw a 25-yard pass to Armstrong for the last touchdown.[33] Judge Robert Worth Bingham hosted a dinner dance in honor of the two football teams.[34]

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (Center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Bartlett (fullback).[33]

Week 9: at Tulane[edit]

Week 9: Centre at Tulane
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 7 7 0 7 21
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[35][36]

The season closed with the defeat of Tulane by a score of 21–0. The Colonels were favored,[35] and McMillin played a part in all of the scoring plays. He threw touchdown passes to Bartlett and to Snoddy, and ran one score in himself.[36] He also kicked all the extra points.

Centre finished the regular season undefeated at 9–0 having given up only 6 points all season.[37]

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (Center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[35]

Post season[edit]

Centre then played in two bowl games to close the season.

Bowls[edit]

Arizona[edit]

Centre vs. Arizona
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 12 6 7 13 38
Arizona 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[38]

In the San Diego East-West Christmas Classic, Centre defeated Arizona 38–0 as rain fell throughout the game.[38] Red Roberts scored the first touchdown five minutes into the match. Bo McMillin went over the right tackle for another score. Centre led 18–0 at the half as Arizona was held to no first downs in two quarters of play.[38]

Arizona later made an attempt to drive towards a score, but Centre intercepted an Arizona pass to keep the game scoreless.[38] Herb Covington scored on a punt return and a sweep to seal the victory.[38]

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[38]

Texas A&M[edit]

Centre vs. Texas A&M
1 2 3 4 Total
Centre 0 0 7 7 14
Texas A&M 2 0 14 6 22

Sources:[39]

After a long trip back, the Colonels played in the Dixie Classic in Dallas, a precursor to the modern Cotton Bowl Classic. The day before the game, McMillin was married.[40] Centre was upset by coach Dana X. Bible's Texas A&M 14–22.[37] It is the game in which Texas A&M's 12th man tradition originated.[41]

Centre held at the goal line by Texas A&M.

The Aggies scored first and early by catching Tom Bartlett behind his goal for a safety.[41] Centre went up 7–2 in the third quarter, Terry Snoddy running in the score after an A&M fumble.[39] The Colonels fumbled the ensuing kickoff. The Aggies got the ball and a pass from Puny Wilson to Jack Evans got the touchdown.[39] Centre fumbled again on the next possession. Wilson scored this time.[41] Centre got the ball back, but Ted Winn intercepted the ball and ran 45 yards for the A&M touchdown.[41] Centre's Snoddy scored again later, but the game ended soon afterwards, 22–14.[39]

Red Roberts made Walter Camp's first-team All-America.

The starting lineup was: Roberts (left end), Gordy (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Kubale (Center), Shadoan (right guard), Cregor (right tackle), James (right end), McMillin (quarterback), Snoddy (left halfback), Armstrong (right halfback), and Bartlett (fullback).[39]

Legacy[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

The 1921 team produced the most stars for Centre's all-time team.[42] Red Roberts was a first-team Walter Camp All-America selection, just the fourth in Southern history. Bo McMillin made Camp's second team and is recognized as a consensus All-American.[43] McMillin was a unanimous All-Southern selection. Red Roberts made composite All-Southern, and Kubale and Snoddy made some selections.[44]

Championships[edit]

The Colonels were recognized by writers generally as champions of the South.[45] Georgia Tech, Georgia, and Vanderbilt split the SIAA championship.[46] Centre was arguably the strongest of the four, for as one publication reads: "Out of eleven games against eastern teams, Centre and Georgia Tech furnished the only two victories and Tech was later trounced by Penn State."[47] For Georgia coach Herman Stegeman, the contest for the theoretical title of greatest Southern team was between Centre, Georgia Tech, and Georgia. Fuzzy Woodruff explains that Centre "belonged to no governing association"[48] with several players thereby accused of professionalism, and Tech was picked as champion "through force of habit".[49]

Personnel[edit]

Depth chart[edit]

The following chart provides a visual depiction of Centre's lineup during the 1921 season with games started at the position reflected in parenthesis. The chart mimics a single wing on offense.

Starters[edit]

Line[edit]

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
28 Ben Cregor Guard 11 Springfield, KY 5'11" 175 22
26 Dick Gibson Guard 1 Louisville, KY
22 Minos Gordy Tackle 11 Abbeville, LA 183
10 Bill James Tackle 11 Fort Worth, TX North Side H. S. 169 23
23 Buck Jones Guard 10 Dallas, TX 208 19
19 Ed Kubale Center 11 Fort Smith, AR Fort Smith H. S. 6'2" 176 21
29 Red Roberts End 11 Somerset, KY Somerset H. S. 6'2" 235 21
21 William Shadoan Guard 8 Somerset, KY 177 23

Backfield[edit]

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
7 Army Armstrong Halfback 11 Fort Smith, AR Fort Smith H. S. 5'10" 154 21
3 Tom Bartlett Fullback 7 Owensboro, KY Owensboro H. S. 5'10" 160 21
11 Bo McMillin Quarterback 11 Fort Worth, TX North Side H. S. 5'9" 175 23
12 Terry Snoddy Halfback 9 Owensboro, KY Owensboro H. S. 5'10" 173 21
5 Hump Tanner Fullback 6 Owensboro, KY Owensboro H. S. 5'5" 165 21
16 Case Thomasson Fullback 1 Newport, KY Newport H. S.

Subs[edit]

Line[edit]

Number Player Position Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
20 George Chinn Guard Harrodsburg, KY
25 Royce Flippin Center Somerset, KY Somerset H. S. 162
2 Hennie Lemon End Mayfield, KY Mayfield H. S. 5'10" 165 20
9 Frank Rubarth Guard Gatesville, TX

Backfield[edit]

Number Player Position Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Swede Anderson Halfback Fort Worth, TX 23
14 Herb Covington Halfback, quarterback Mayfield, KY Mayfield H. S. 5'5" 158 19
Jim Green Halfback Louisville, KY 130 20
Hope Hudgins Halfback Amarillo, TX
Dewey Kimbel Halfback Louisville, KY
Tom Moran Fullback Horse Cave, KY Horse Cave H. S. 5'8" 175 22
1 Joe Murphy Halfback Columbus, OH East H. S. 130 22

[50][51]

Unlisted[edit]

Player Position Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Don Beane ? Pittsburgh, PA
Weldon Bradley ?
Ray Class ? Middletown, OH
Leslie Combs
Sheridan Rhodes Ingerton ? Amarillo, TX
R. Newell  ?
Edgar C. Newlin ? Newport, KY
Jim Priest ?

Scoring leaders[edit]

The following is an incomplete list of statistics and scores, largely dependent on newspaper summaries.

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Points
Bo McMillin 12 19 0 91
Terry Snoddy 8 0 0 48
Red Roberts 6 5 0 41
Hump Tanner 4 5 1 32
Herb Covington 5 1 0 31
Army Armstrong 4 0 0 24
Tom Bartlett 3 2 0 20
Hennie Lemon 2 1 0 13
Case Thomasson 2 0 0 12
Jim Green 1 0 0 6
Hope Hudgins 1 0 0 6
Joe Murphy 1 0 0 6
Ray Class 0 1 1 4
Total 49 34 2 334

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hal Morris (June 26, 2006). "ESPN ranks 1921 Centre-Harvard game among college football's greatest upsets". Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  2. ^ "C6-H0 plays a prominent part in nation's sports lexicon". centre.edu. Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  3. ^ History and Records Archived 2009-11-16 at the Wayback Machine., Centre College, retrieved March 13, 2008.
  4. ^ "Kentucky School Wins". The Dekaly Daily Chronicle. 21 (1). December 1, 1919. 
  5. ^ a b Camp 1922, p. 95
  6. ^ Foldesy, Jody. "Bowls burgeon as big business", The Washington Times. December 21, 1997. Page A1.
  7. ^ Billy Evans (November 23, 1921). "Billy Evans Tells How Centre Crosses 'Em Up". The Southeast Missourian. 
  8. ^ "Armstrong's death recalls glory years". The Milwaukee Journal. October 13, 1981. 
  9. ^ "Charles Moran and "Tiny" Thornhill". centre.omeka.net. Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Kicks 90 Goals, "Red Weaver's Toe Stuff May Be Useless Next Year". The Wichita Beacon. December 24, 1920. p. 4. Retrieved March 16, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ Camp 1922, p. 161
  12. ^ a b "Centre College Football Records (1920-1939)". centre.edu. Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  13. ^ a b c "Centre Beats Clemson In Stubborn Contest; Old Spirit To Rescue". The Courier-Journal. October 2, 1921. p. 45. Retrieved June 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ a b c d The Associated Press (October 9, 1921). "Touchdowns Made In Final Quarter". Durham Morning Herald. p. 2. Retrieved February 13, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h "Victory". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 16, 1921. p. 20. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ a b c "Transylvania Is Swamped". Cincinnati Enquirer. October 23, 1921. p. 20. Retrieved August 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ Camp 1922, p. 26
  18. ^ a b c "McMillin's Brilliant Sprint Gives Centre Victory Over Harvard". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. October 30, 1921. p. 6. Retrieved February 13, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ a b "Harvard Historical Scores". jhowell.net. Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Ah yes, Centre College remembers it quite well". The News. October 29, 1996. 
  21. ^ Flaherty, p. 121
  22. ^ Goldstein, Richard (1996). Ivy League Autumns. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 978-0-312-14629-0. 
  23. ^ "How Centre Colonels Defeated the Crimson In Cambridge Stadium". The Courier-Journal. October 30, 1921. p. 49. Retrieved February 13, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  24. ^ E. Benjamin Samuels (October 28, 2011). "Remembering a Forgotten Upset". thecrimson.com. Retrieved November 27, 2016. 
  25. ^ Kaplan, Inc., p. 105
  26. ^ Clark D. Shaughnessy (September 11, 1931). "Dixie Football At the Top, Says Loyola Mentor". The Tuscaloosa News. 
  27. ^ "Centre College Remembers Day When It Was King of the Gridiron". chronicle.com. Retrieved 7 August 2008. 
  28. ^ "C6-H0 plays a prominent part in nation's sports lexicon". centre.edu. Archived from the original on 5 July 2008. Retrieved 7 August 2008. 
  29. ^ Merle Crowell (January 1, 1922). "David Whips Goliath Again". American Magazine. Colver Publishing House. 93: 52–53 – via Google Books. 
  30. ^ a b c d e "Fighting Wildcats Are Humbled By The Centre College Crew". The Kentucky Kernel. November 11, 1921. 
  31. ^ a b c d e "Moran's Men Defeat Alabama Poly Eleven In One-Sided Contest". The Courier-Journal. November 13, 1921. p. 56. Retrieved June 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  32. ^ "'We Were Outclassed' says Auburn coach". The Courier-Journal. November 13, 1921. p. 56. Retrieved June 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  33. ^ a b c "Centre College Easily Takes The Measure of Washington and Lee". The Courier-Journal. November 20, 1921. p. 49. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  34. ^ "Dinner Dance". The Courier-Journal. November 20, 1921. p. 19. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  35. ^ a b c "Colonels Favorite In Contest With Tulane On Southern Gridiron". The Courier-Journal. November 24, 1921. p. 9. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  36. ^ a b "'Bo' McMillan and Praying Colonels Defeat Tulane". Houston Post. November 25, 1921. p. 10. Retrieved June 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  37. ^ a b "1921 Centre College football scores". www.jhowell.net. September 28, 2000. Archived from the original on September 28, 2000. Retrieved December 2, 2016. 
  38. ^ a b c d e f "Centre Overwhelms Arizona on Muddy Field, 38 to 0". Arizona Daily Star. December 27, 1921. p. 9. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  39. ^ a b c d e "Texas Aggies Defeat Centre By Score 22-14". The Taylor Daily Press. January 3, 1922. p. 2. Retrieved June 6, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  40. ^ "Bo McMillin Married.; Centre College Football Star Weds Miss Miers at Fort Worth.". The New York Times. January 3, 1922. 
  41. ^ a b c d Schoor, Gene (1994). The Fightin' Texas Aggies: 100 Years of A&M Football. Dallas, Texas: Taylor Publishing Company. 
  42. ^ George Trevor (November 25, 1935). "1921 Team Produces Most Stars For Centre's All-Time Eleven". Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved March 24, 2015 – via Google news.  open access publication – free to read
  43. ^ "Walter Camp's All-America Selections for 1921". The New York Times. December 21, 1921. Retrieved March 6, 2013. 
  44. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall "All-Southern Football Team". Charlotte Observer. December 4, 1921. 
  45. ^ Camp 1922, p. 75
  46. ^ "Champions of the South regardless of conference affiliation". Retrieved December 1, 2016. 
  47. ^ "Football Leads Went West In 1921 Records". Berkeley Daily Gazette. November 25, 1921. 
  48. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 148
  49. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 183
  50. ^ W. C. Alcock (February 21, 1940). "Sport Scope". The Advocate-Messenger. p. 2. Retrieved May 27, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  51. ^ "Statistics of University and Centre Elevens". The Harvard Crimson. October 29, 1921. Retrieved December 1, 2016. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]