1921 Georgia Bulldogs football team

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1921 Georgia Bulldogs football
UGA logo.svg
SIAA co-champion
Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1921 record 7–2–1 (5–0–1 SIAA)
Head coach Herman Stegeman
Assistant coach James DeHart
Captain Owen Reynolds
Home stadium Sanford Field
Uniform
10sUGAuniform.png
Seasons
« 1920 1922 »
1921 SIAA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Centre + 5 0 0     10 1 0
Georgia Tech + 4 0 0     8 1 0
Georgia + 6 0 1     7 2 1
Vanderbilt + 5 0 1     7 0 1
Tennessee 4 1 1     6 2 1
Florida 4 1 2     6 3 2
Mississippi College 3 1 1     7 2 1
Sewanee 4 2 0     6 2 0
Furman 4 2 1     7 2 1
LSU 2 1 1     6 1 1
Transylvania 2 1 0     4 4 0
Auburn 3 2 0     5 3 0
The Citadel 2 2 1     3 3 2
Mississippi A&M 2 3 1     4 4 1
Tulane 3 4 0     4 6 0
Alabama 2 4 2     5 4 2
Oglethorpe 2 4 0     5 4 0
Mercer 2 5 0     3 6 0
Chattanooga 1 3 0     4 6 0
Louisville 0 1 0     2 2 1
Kentucky 0 2 1     4 3 1
Millsaps 0 3 1     0 3 1
Ole Miss 0 3 0     3 6 0
Georgetown (KY) 0 3 0     2 6 0
Wofford 0 3 0     2 7 0
Clemson 0 4 2     1 6 2
Howard 0 5 0     3 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1921 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1921 college football season. This was the team's second season under the guidance of head coach Herman Stegeman. The Bulldogs had a 7–2–1 record,[1] and were also co-champion of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association: co-champions Centre, Georgia Tech, and Vanderbilt were also undefeated. Vanderbilt tied Georgia with an onside kick in their game which decided conference title.[2] The Bulldogs' only two losses came against two of the football powerhouses of the day, Eastern schools Harvard and Dartmouth.

All season, not a single team scored through its line, which was the greatest in the South,[3] and featured four All-Southern players.[4] Guard Hugh Whelchel was selected a third-team All-American by Walter Camp.

Before the season[edit]

On the line with Whelchel were captain and end Owen Reynolds, tackles Artie Pew and Joe Bennett, and center Bum Day. According to Patrick Garbin, "Prior to the 1960s, Bennett is likely Georgia's most outstanding tackle."[5]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 1 Mercer* Sanford FieldAthens, GA W 28–0  
October 8 Furman Sanford Field • Athens, GA W 27–7  
October 15 at Harvard* Harvard StadiumAllston, MA L 7–10   25,000
October 22 Oglethorpe* Sanford Field • Athens W 14–0  
October 29 vs. Auburn McClung StadiumColumbus, GA (Rivalry) W 7–0  
November 6 Virginia Sanford Field • Athens, GA W 21–0  
November 13 at Vanderbilt Dudley FieldNashville, TN T 7–7  
November 20 vs. Alabama Ponce de Leon ParkAtlanta, GA W 22–0  
November 25 Clemson Sanford Field • Athens, GA W 28–0  
November 27 vs. Dartmouth* Grant Field • Atlanta, GA L 0–7  
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.

Season summary[edit]

Mercer[edit]

The season opened with a 28–0 defeat of Josh Cody's Mercer Baptists. The starting lineup was O. Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), Murray (right end), Pierce (quarterback), Reynolds (left halfback), Spicer (right halfback), and Collings (fullback)[6]

Furman[edit]

In the second week of play, Georgia beat Furman 27–7. Jim Tom Reynolds provided the feature play when he returned an interception 40 yards to set up a touchdown.[7]

The starting lineup was Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), Murray (right end), Randall (quarterback), Fletcher (left halfback), Spicer (right halfback), Tanner (fullback).[7]

at Harvard[edit]

Georgia at Harvard
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 7 7
Harvard 7 3 0 0 10

The Bulldogs traveled north and were defeated by the eastern power Harvard Crimson 10–7. They were the first team all season to score on the Crimson. Harvard won by a blocked punt recovery and a drop kicked field goal.[8] A triple pass from Collings to Jim Reynolds to Dick Hartley in the final period got Georgia's touchdown.[8][9]

The starting lineup was O. Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), Murray (right end), Randall (quarterback), Fletcher (left halfback), Hartley (right halfback), and Spicer (fullback).[8]

Oglethorpe[edit]

Georgia easily defeated the in-state Oglethorpe Stormy Petrels 14–0. The starting lineup was Bennett (left end), Colley (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Boney (center), Vandiver (right guard), Williams (right tackle), Richardson (right end), Pearce (quarterback), Clark (left halfback), Thompson (right halfback), Tanner (fullback).[10]

Auburn[edit]

Auburn at Georgia
1 2 3 4 Total
Auburn 0 0 0 0 0
Georgia 0 0 0 7 7

Georgia beat the heavily favored Auburn team 7–0 when Teany Randall scored in the final period.[12]

The starting lineup was Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), P. Bennett (right end), Randall (quarterback), Hartley (left halfback), Spicer (right halfback), Fletcher (fullback).[11]

Virginia[edit]

The Bulldogs shutout the Virginia Cavaliers 21–0. UVA presented Georgia with a memorial tablet to Richard Von Albade Gammon.[13]

The starting lineup was Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), Murray (right end), Collings (quarterback), Hartley (left halfback), J. Reynolds (right halfback), Tanner (fullback).[13]

at Vanderbilt[edit]

Georgia at Vanderbilt
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 7 0 0 7
Vanderbilt 0 0 0 7 7

In the seventh week of play, the Bulldogs faced the Vanderbilt Commodores at Curry Field. The game was the highlight of Vanderbilt's schedule this year, deciding the conference champion, and was described by the New York Times as an "important clash";[16] another source called it a "tooth and toe nail event."[17] Birmingham News sports editor "Zipp" Newman wrote weeks before the game, "Stegeman has a powerful team and with all the regulars in the game, the team has a chance of going through the season undefeated unless it be Vanderbilt that stops her".[18]

Vanderbilt's record against Georgia was 6–1; Georgia's only win was 4–0, in 1898, and the all-time score was 184–4 in favor of the Commodores.[19] The Bulldogs were favored to win their first meeting since 1912.[20] In the first quarter, both teams were evenly matched. The Commodores had their best chance to score when Thomas Ryan beat the defense, but he dropped Jess Neely's pass.[15] Vanderbilt had another chance to score when a Georgia field goal was blocked by Lynn Bomar and picked up by Tot McCullough, who was caught from behind before he could score.[15]

Vanderbilt tying the score

In the second quarter, Georgia outplayed Vanderbilt. The Commodores had two first downs in the first half, both because of Bulldog penalties.[14] A Commodore punt was returned 15 yards by Georgia to the Vanderbilt 30-yard line,[21] and the Bulldogs completed an 18-yard pass from Dick Hartley to halfback Jim Tom Reynolds[15][22] on Vanderbilt's 12-yard line. After three short gains, Hartley advanced five yards and Vanderbilt was penalized for being offside. Jim Reynolds, gaining a yard or so, went over for the touchdown with a counter on the following series; the close call was disputed.[21] At the end of the half, Georgia had gained 113 yards to Vanderbilt's nine.[3]

The teams were as evenly matched in the third quarter as they had been in the first, with Vanderbilt gaining only two first downs.[23] Soon after the start of the fourth quarter[24] Neely intercepted a pass, weaving for a 25-yard return to Georgia's 40-yard line.[25] Two long pass attempts failed, and Thomas Ryan lined up to punt. Rupert Smith sneaked in behind Ryan, rushing to recover the 25-yard onside kick from scrimmage. Smith jumped up to get the ball from a horde of Bulldogs after they let it bounce, and raced for a 15-yard touchdown.[23][26] After he added an extra point, the game ended in a 7–7 tie.[n 1]

Lynn Bomar's play as a linebacker was noted. According to Nashville Tennessean sportswriter Blinkey Horn, "Georgia would have trampled Vanderbilt to atoms but for Lynn Bomar ... [who] was the stellar performer of the game. In the first-half he made two-thirds of the tackles";[26] Bomar stopped five Georgia touchdowns that day. Tom Ryan's punting was also key to keeping the game close, despite the Bulldogs' 18 first downs.[23] The starting lineup was O. Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Vandiver (right guard), Pew (right tackle), Murray (right end), J. Reynolds (quarterback), Randall (left halfback), Thompson (right halfback), and Collings (fullback).[14][28][29]

Alabama[edit]

Alabama at Georgia
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 0 0 0
Georgia 7 0 0 15 22

On a muddy Ponce de Leon Park, Georgia handily defeated the Alabama Crimson Tide 22–0. Jim Reynolds scored first for Georgia. After Whelchel blocked a Charles Bartlett punt, Bartlett fell on it for a safety. After another punt block, Day recovered the ball deep in Alabama territory, and eventually Spicer ran in a touchdown. In the fourt quarter, the Bulldogs had an 80-yard touchdown drive. Randall and Spicer made 20 yards on end runs, and pass from Hartley to Randall netted 30 yards, down to the 3-yard line, from where Randall scored.[31]

The starting lineup was O. Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), P. Bennett (right end), Fitts (quarterback), Thompson (left halfback), Spicer (right halfback), and Collings (fullback).[30][32]

Clemson[edit]

Clemson was beaten 28–0. The starting lineup was O. Reynolds (left end), Bennett (left tackle), Whelchel (left guard), Day (center), Anthony (right guard), Pew (right tackle), P. Bennett (right end), Randall (quarterback), Hartley (left halfback), Spicer (right halfback), and Tanner (fullback).[33]

Dartmouth[edit]

Dartmouth at Georgia
1 2 3 4 Total
Dartmouth 0 7 0 0 7
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0

Georgia was beaten by eastern power Dartmouth 7–0. Dartmouth scored on a 64-yard forward pass that went 44 in the air, from Jim Robertson to Lynch.[34] Dick Hartley fumbled twice.[35]

Postseason[edit]

Whelchel was elected captain for next year.

Players[edit]

Varsity letterwinners[edit]

Line[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Thurston Anthony tackle
Joe Bennett tackle Statesboro, Georgia 180 20
Sam Boney center
Bum Day center Nashville, Georgia Porter Military Academy 5'10" 190 23
Ike Joselove center
Artie Pew tackle Damascus, Georgia 195 23
Owen Reynolds end Douglasville, Georgia 6'3" 180
Jim Taylor tackle Hazlehurst, Georgia
Nemo Vandiver guard
Hugh Whelchel guard Dahlonega, Georgia 200 21

Backfield[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Dave Collings halfback
John H. Fletcher fullback Tifton, Georgia 200
Dick Hartley halfback Fort Valley, Georgia
Dick Mulvehill quarterback
Teany Randall halfback
Jim Tom Reynolds halfback

Unlisted[edit]

Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
Paul Anderson
Jacob Butler
Hervey Cleckley
Dan Post
Sam Richardson
James D. Thomason

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ One source credits Vanderbilt with the first successful onside kick in the history of football,[27] despite the fact the onside kick was legalized in 1906, and the first one in the South was executed by Auburn against Georgia in 1896.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1921 Georgia Bulldogs Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ Fuzzy Woodruff (November 13, 1921). "Onside Kick In Final Quarter Ties Struggle For Commodores". Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Retrieved March 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  3. ^ a b Fred Russell and Maxwell Edward Benson. Fifty Years of Vanderbilt Football. "1921-Wallace Wade Hired As Assistant". Nashville, TN, 1938, p. 39
  4. ^ Camp, Walter, ed. National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Rules: Official Intercollegiate Football Guide. 45 Rose St, New York: American Sports, 1922. Print. Spalding's Athletic Library.
  5. ^ Patrick Garbin. About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. p. 30. 
  6. ^ Jerome Jones, Jr. (October 2, 1921). "Stubborn Resistance of Baptists Holds Athenians To 28-0 Victory". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Retrieved January 1, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  7. ^ a b Woodruff 1928, pp. 147-148
  8. ^ a b c d Cliff Wheatley (October 16, 1921). "Crimson Beats Red and Black By Lonely Goal". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Retrieved May 7, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  9. ^ "Harvard Trims Georgia". Reading Eagle. October 16, 1921. 
  10. ^ Woodruff 1928, pp. 154-155
  11. ^ a b Clark Howell, Jr. (October 30, 1921). "Last Gasp Rally of Georgia Downs Plainsmen 7 to 0". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Retrieved January 1, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  12. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 158
  13. ^ a b Woodruff 1928, pp. 160-161
  14. ^ a b c closed access publication – behind paywall "Commodores Tied In Last". The Columbus Ledger. November 13, 1921. 
  15. ^ a b c d closed access publication – behind paywall "Bulldog Eleven Is Held To Tie By The Commodores". The Macon Daily Telegraph. November 13, 1921. 
  16. ^ "Many Good Games On Schedule Today". New York Times. November 12, 1921. 
  17. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall C.E. Baker (November 1, 1921). "Vanderbilt To Play Bama Eleven Saturday". Macon Telegraph. 
  18. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall Zipp Newman (October 31, 1921). "Georgia Heeds Opportunity's Knock While Auburn Turns Deaf Ear Says Zipp Newman". The Columbus Enquirer Sun. 
  19. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall "Georgia Beat Vandy in '98". Columbus Ledger. November 10, 1921. 
  20. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall "Gridiron Gossip". Montgomery Advertiser. November 11, 1921. 
  21. ^ a b closed access publication – behind paywall "Vanderbilt Holds Georgia To A Tie". Dallas Morning News. November 13, 1921. 
  22. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall Vanderbilt Holds Georgia To 7-7 Tie Fort Worth Star Telegram November 13, 1921
  23. ^ a b c "Game With Vandy Is Tied As Novel Play Is Pulled Successful". The Red And Black. November 18, 1921. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. 
  24. ^ closed access publication – behind paywall "Vanderbilt Ties With Bulldogs". The State (Columbia, SC). November 13, 1921. 
  25. ^ "Commodores Tie In Last Period". The Palm Beach Post. November 13, 1921. 
  26. ^ a b closed access publication – behind paywall "Georgia and Vandy Battle to a Draw". The Columbus Enquirer. November 13, 1921. 
  27. ^ Bratton, Michael Wayne (January 12, 2016). "The history and evolution of the onside kick". Fox Sports. Archived from the original on February 23, 2016. Retrieved March 8, 2016. 
  28. ^ Fuzzy Woodruff (November 13, 1921). "Onside Kick In Final Quarter Ties Struggle For Commodores". Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  29. ^ Woodruff 1928, pp. 168
  30. ^ a b Fuzzy Woodruff (November 20, 1921). "Bulldog Swamps Alabama 22-0 In Hard Battle Fought In Mud". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 3. Retrieved May 7, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  31. ^ http://www.rolltide.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/recaps/1921-season.pdf#page=3
  32. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 171
  33. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 178
  34. ^ a b "Georgia-Dartmouth Detail". The Atlanta Constitution. November 27, 1921. p. 2. Retrieved May 7, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  35. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=0jRaCgAAQBAJ&pg=PT52
  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. 2.