1922 Zulu

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1922 Zulu
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered by E. L. Johnson
Discovery site Johannesburg (UO)
Discovery date 25 April 1949
Designations
MPC designation 1922 Zulu
Named after
Zulu (tribe)[3]
1949 HC
main-belt (outer)
Orbital characteristics[2][4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 66.72 yr (24368 days)
Aphelion 4.7945 AU (717.25 Gm)
Perihelion 1.6792 AU (251.20 Gm)
3.2368 AU (484.22 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.48123
5.82 yr (2127.1 d)
120.20°
0° 10m 9.3s / day
Inclination 35.436°
226.52°
31.408°
Earth MOID 0.716002 AU (107.1124 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.62761 AU (93.889 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.734
Physical characteristics
18.64 h (0.777 d)
12.2[5]
12.3[2]

1922 Zulu, provisional designation 1949 HC, is an outer main-belt asteroid discovered on April 25, 1949, by Ernest Leonard Johnson at Johannesburg Union Observatory in South Africa.[1] It is one of very few asteroids located in the 2 : 1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter.[6] This asteroid was lost shortly after discovery (see Lost asteroid), and only rediscovered in 1974 by Richard Eugene McCrosky, Cheng-yuan Shao and JH Bulger based on a predicted position by C. M. Bardwell of the Cincinnati Observatory.[7] It is quite highly inclined for asteroids in the asteroid belt, with an inclination of 35.4 degrees. This may be related to its 2:1 resonance with Jupiter.

The asteroid is named after the South African tribe, Zulu, to recognize some of the tribesmen who were faithful workmen at the Johannesburg Union Observatory. It is closely related to 1362 Griqua and 1921 Pala, which also received tribal name and librate in the 2:1 ratio of Jupiter's mean motion as well.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Archived from the original on 23 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-05. 
  2. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1922 Zulu (1949 HC)" (2015-09-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1922) Zulu. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 154. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "(1922) Zulu". AstDyS. University of Pisa. Retrieved December 11, 2008. 
  5. ^ Tholen (2007). "Asteroid Absolute Magnitudes". EAR-A-5-DDR-ASTERMAG-V11.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on June 17, 2012. Retrieved January 1, 2009. 
  6. ^ Roig; Nesvorny, D.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; et al. (2002). "Asteroids in the 2 : 1 resonance with Jupiter: dynamics and size distribution". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 335 (2): 417–431. Bibcode:2002MNRAS.335..417R. doi:10.1046/j.1365-8711.2002.05635.x. 
  7. ^ Brian G. Marsden (October 24, 1974). "International Astronomical Union Circular 2710". Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. Retrieved 2011-07-05. 

External links[edit]