1922 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
Years: 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1922:

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

  • For the first time in history, skywriting is used for advertising purposes when Royal Air Force Captain Cyril Turner writes "Daily Mail" over the Derby at Epsom Downs Racecourse near Epsom, Surrey, England.[16]
  • The Italian Corpo Aeronautico Militare ("Military Aviation Corps") holds experimental maneuvers in Friuli, Italy, to test the ability of military aircraft to coordinate troop movements on the ground by informing ground commanders of the movements of friendly and enemy ground forces. The experiment is less successful than hoped because of communication difficulties.[17]
  • The admirals′ committee of the Regia Marina (Italian Royal Navy) meets to discuss aviation generally and the use of airplanes in naval operations. Among the opinions expressed are that strikes by torpedo planes against ships at sea would be hampered by their need for support by reconnaissance and attack aircraft and the small amount of explosive in aerial torpedoes and would be no more dangerous that torpedo boat attacks and unlikely to achieve any success; that the Italian people would not want their defense to rely in a force "enclosed in such a fragile wrapping as today′s aircraft;" and that the airplane would take a long time to develop into a practical naval weapon and at present was "contrary to the ethical and aesthetic elements the Regia Marina was accustomed to demand in [its] preparation for war." Despite some positive comments on the freedom of movement of aircraft to conduct deep strikes against an enemy and the possibility that airplanes could provide a defense of coastlines and land borders out to a distance of 200 miles (322 km), the committee concludes that no warship had yet been sunk by aircraft and that "notwithstanding the many writings and opinions tending to exalt the value of aerial forces, they cannot yet be considered so important as to substitute, even in part, for the actions of naval and military forces in war."[18]
  • May 1 - Deruluft (Deutsche-Russische Luftverkehrs, "German-Russian Airlines") commences operations.
  • May 7 – As part of the ceremonies during the inaugural weekend of Stadium Jalapeño at Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico, the American pilot Frank Hawks lands his Standard J-1 biplane on the field within the stadium.
  • May 15 - Instone Air Line commences flights between London and Brussels.
  • May 24 - The first attempt to fly around the world begins as British Army Major Wilfred T. Blake, Royal Air Force Captain Norman Macmillan, and British Army Lieutenant Colonel L. E. Broome depart Croydon, England, in the modified Airco DH.9 G-EBDE. They plan to fly to Calcutta, India, in the DH.9, then on to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in a Fairey IIIC floatplane, then to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in another DH.9, and finally from Montreal to Great Britain, covering 23,690 miles (38,148 km) and completing the journey on September 7, 1922.[19]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

HAWA Vampyr
  • Britain's Air Ministry issues its first requirement for a purpose-designed night fighter. Specification 25/22 will eventually be filled by the Hawker Woodcock.
  • The first national French glider meeting, the Congrės expérimental d'aviation sans moteur, organized by the Association of French Flyers and partly funded by the French government, takes place in Combegrasse, Puy-de-Dôme.
  • August 7
    • The seventh annual Aerial Derby is held, sponsored by the Royal Aero Club. Ten participants fly over a 99-mile (159-kilometer) circuit beginning and ending at Croydon Airport in London with control points at Brooklands, Hertford, Epping, and West Thurrock; the aircraft fly the circuit twice. L. R. Tait-Cox is the overall winner, completing the course in a Gloster Mars III at an average speed of 177.85 mph (286.22 km/h) in 1 hour 6 minutes 48.4 seconds; L. L. Carter wins the handicap competition in a Bristol M.1D with a time of 1 hour 50 minutes 0.4 seconds at an average speed of 107.85 mph (173.57 km/h) with a handicap of 47 minutes 9 seconds.
    • The second annual Air League Challenge Cup race is held at Croydon Airport in London. Competitors race over a three-lap course in teams of three, with each team member physically passing a baton to the next team member after completing one lap. Two Royal Air Force teams – one representing the defending champions at RAF Kenley, the other representing RAF Uxbridge – are the only entrants. The race is cancelled when the second lap begins with the engine of RAF Kenley's Avro 504 refusing to start and RAF Uxbridge's Avro 504 crash-landing after suffering engine failure on takeoff, narrowly missing the crowd. One SE.5a from each RAF station continues with an informal, two-lap race, which RAF Uxbridge wins easily, but RAF Kenley retains the cup from 1921.[24]
  • August 10 - The 1922 Schneider Trophy race is flown at Naples, Italy. It is won by the only non-Italian competitor, H.C. Biard in a British Supermarine Sea Lion II, with a winning speed of 234.5 km/h (145.7 mph).
  • August 15 – During a bombing show at Puck, Poland, an observer prematurely drops a bomb from a Lübeck-Travemünde F.4 floatplane. The bomb falls among spectators, killing 13 people and injuring 34.[25]
  • August 18 - Arthur Martens makes the first sailplane flight of over one hour during a glider competition at the Wasserkuppe in Germany, remaining aloft for 66 minutes. His aircraft, named Vampyr ("Vampire") is designed by Wolfgang Klemmperer.
  • August 22 - Captain Norman Macmillan and cine-photographer Geoffrey Mallins are rescued from the Bay of Bengal when their civilianised Fairey IIIC floatplane suffers engine failure and capsizes after landing in the Indian Ocean at the beginning of the second leg of their attempt to make the first flight around the world. Major Wilfred T. Blake had already left the effort due to appendicitis, and Malin had replaced Lieutenant Colonel L. E. Broome. The two men are rescued from their overturned aircraft on August 24. They had taken 91 days reach Burma, and they are far behind schedule when their around-the-world attempt ends.[26]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

First flights[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Entered service[edit]

Retirements[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 193.
  2. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 197.
  3. ^ Peattie, Mark R., Sunburst: The Rise of Japanese Naval Air Power 1909-1941, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2001, ISBN 1-55750-432-6, p. 15.
  4. ^ Peattie, Mark R., Sunburst: The Rise of Japanese Naval Air Power 1909-1941, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2001, ISBN 1-55750-432-6, p. 35.
  5. ^ Layman, R.D., Before the Aircraft Carrier: The Development of Aviation Vessels 1849-1922, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1989, ISBN 0-87021-210-9, pp. 103, 105.
  6. ^ Chant, Chris, The World's Great Bombers, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2000, ISBN 0-7607-2012-6, p. 44.
  7. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 58.
  8. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 428.
  9. ^ "1922 Martinsyde Quick Six". RealClassic.co.uk. 2002. Retrieved 2014-11-07. 
  10. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  11. ^ Potter, E. B., Sea Power: A Naval History, Second Edition, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1981, ISBN 0-87021-607-4, p. 233.
  12. ^ Potter, E. B., Sea Power: A Naval History, Second Edition, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1981, ISBN 0-87021-607-4, p. 235.
  13. ^ Taylor 1988, pp.98—101.
  14. ^ O'Connor, Derek, "'Foredoomed to Failure': An Ill-Prepared British Crew Set Out in 1922 On the First-Ever Attempt to Fly Around the World," Aviation History, January 2014, p. 38.
  15. ^ a b Hardesty, Von, Red Phoenix: The Rise of Soviet Air Power 1941-1945, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1982, ISBN 0-87474-510-1, p. 44.
  16. ^ "S. Sidney Pike Skywriting Corporation of America Collection 1920s-1940s". Smithsonian. National Air and Space Museum. Retrieved 2015-08-29. 
  17. ^ Gooch, John, Mussolini and His Generals: The Armed Forces and Fascist Foreign Policy, 1922-1940, Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press, 2007, ISBN 978-0-521-85602-7, p. 56.
  18. ^ Gooch, John, Mussolini and His Generals: The Armed Forces and Fascist Foreign Policy, 1922-1940, Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press, 2007, ISBN 978-0-521-85602-7, p. 39.
  19. ^ O'Connor, Derek, "'Foredoomed to Failure': An Ill-Prepared British Crew Set Out in 1922 on the First-Ever Attempt to Fly Around the World," Aviation History, January 2014, p. 38.
  20. ^ "A Concise History of the Irish Air Corps". Óglaigh na hÉireann. Retrieved 2014-11-07. 
  21. ^ A Chronological History of Coast Guard Aviation: The Early Years, 1915-1938.
  22. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-295-8, p. 195.
  23. ^ Layman, R.D., Before the Aircraft Carrier: The Development of Aviation Vessels 1849-1922, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1989, ISBN 0-87021-210-9, p. 121.
  24. ^ afleetingpeace.org Air League Challenge Cup - 1922
  25. ^ Olejko, Andrzej. Tragiczne pokazy (Tragic show) in: "Aero Magazyn Lotniczy" nr. 2(21)/2009, pp.4-7 (Polish)
  26. ^ O'Connor, Derek, "'Foredoomed to Failure': An Ill-Prepared British Crew Set Out in 1922 on the First-Ever Attempt to Fly Around the World," Aviation History, January 2014, p. 42.
  27. ^ Daniel, Clifton, Chronicle of the 20th Century, Mount Kisco, New York: Chronicle Publications, 1987, ISBN 0-942191-01-3, p. 295.
  28. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 430.
  29. ^ NavSource.org Kenneth Whiting
  30. ^ Harriet Veitch (2006-12-02). "How big are skywriting letters?". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2008-09-17. 
  31. ^ "November 28, 1922: First Skywriting Ad over New York's Times Square". Retrieved 2015-08-29. 
  32. ^ "Repeat his "Sky Writing"". New York Times. 2015-11-22. Retrieved 2015-08-30. 
  33. ^ Layman, R.D., Before the Aircraft Carrier: The Development of Aviation Vessels 1849-1922, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1989, ISBN 0-87021-210-9, p. 124.
  34. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 423.
  35. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 186.
  36. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 292.
  37. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 36.
  38. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 122.
  39. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 424.
  40. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, pp. 325-326.
  41. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 76.

References[edit]