1923 Osiris

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1923 Osiris
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Palomar–Leiden survey
C. J. van Houten, I. van Houten-Groeneveld, Tom Gehrels
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 24 September 1960
Designations
MPC designation 1923 Osiris
Named after
Osiris[2]
4011 P-L · 1964 TO2
1966 FR · 1974 KN
1974 KP · 1974 LE
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 61.43 yr (22436 days)
Aphelion 2.5900 AU (387.46 Gm)
Perihelion 2.2803 AU (341.13 Gm)
2.4351 AU (364.29 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.063603
3.80 yr (1388.0 d)
113.51°
0° 15m 33.732s / day
Inclination 4.9584°
353.07°
106.29°
Earth MOID 1.30276 AU (194.890 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.49189 AU (372.781 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.497
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 13.1 km
Mean radius
6.555 ± 0.4 km
0.0591 ± 0.008
C (SMASSII)
13.6

1923 Osiris, also designated 4011 P-L, is a main-belt asteroid discovered on September 24, 1960, by Cornelis Johannes van Houten and Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at Palomar.[3] Osiris is a C-type asteroid, about 13 kilometers in diameter.[1]

The designation P–L stands for Palomar–Leiden, named after Palomar Observatory and Leiden Observatory, which collaborated on the fruitful Palomar–Leiden survey in the 1960s. Gehrels used Palomar's Samuel Oschin telescope (also known as the 48-inch Schmidt Telescope), and shipped the photographic plates to Cornelis Johannes van Houten and Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld at Leiden Observatory. The trio are credited with several thousand asteroid discoveries.

It is named after Osiris, the Egyptian god of vegetation, of the waxing and waning Moon and of the annual flooding of the Nile.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1923 Osiris (4011 P-L)" (2015-05-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1923) Osiris. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 154. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "New Names of Minor Planets" (PDF), Minor Planet Circular, Cambridge, Mass: Minor Planet Center (MPC 5013), 1 Nov 1979, ISSN 0736-6884 

External links[edit]