1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team

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1927 Georgia Bulldogs football
UGA logo.svg
National Champions (Boand, Poling, Berryman)
Conference Southern Conference
1927 record 9–1 (6–1 SoCon)
Head coach George "Kid" Woodruff
Captain Chick Shiver
Home stadium Sanford Field
Seasons
« 1926 1928 »
1927 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Georgia Tech § 7 0 1     8 1 1
Tennessee § 5 0 1     8 0 1
NC State § 4 0 0     9 1 0
Vanderbilt 5 0 2     8 1 2
Georgia 6 1 0     9 1 0
Florida 5 2 0     7 3 0
Ole Miss 3 2 0     5 3 0
Virginia 4 4 0     5 4 0
Clemson 2 2 0     5 3 1
Alabama 3 4 1     5 4 1
LSU 2 3 1     4 4 1
Mississippi State 2 3 0     5 3 0
Washington & Lee 2 3 0     4 4 1
Virginia Tech 2 3 0     5 4 0
Maryland 3 5 0     4 7 0
South Carolina 2 4 0     4 5 0
VMI 2 4 0     6 4 0
Tulane 2 5 1     2 5 1
North Carolina 2 5 0     4 6 0
Sewanee 1 4 0     2 6 0
Kentucky 1 5 0     3 6 1
Auburn 0 6 1     0 7 2
§ – Conference co-champions

The 1927 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1927 college football season. This was the last season that George "Kid" Woodruff served as the head coach of the Georgia Bulldogs football team and the team's 34th season of college football. The Bulldogs posted a 9–1–0 record,[1] and, for the first time in its history, had a contemporary claim to a national championship.

Called the "dream and wonder team," the Bulldogs were ranked No. 1 in the nation with one regular season game remaining, but were upset by Georgia Tech (the next season's national champion) by a score of 12–0 at Grant Field in Atlanta, Georgia.[2] Nevertheless, at the end of the season, Georgia was ranked number 1 in two polls recognized by the NCAA.[3] Georgia was listed number one by Boand System and Poling System. Georgia was also retroactively awarded the national championship for the 1927 season in the Berryman rankings system [4]

Oddly enough, Georgia did not win the Southern Conference championship in 1927 as a result of their loss to Georgia Tech in the last game of the season. Georgia Tech (7–0–1 in the conference), NC State (4–0–0 in the conference) and Tennessee (5–0–1) all finished undefeated in the Southern Conference that year.[5]

The '27 season featured Georgia's first-ever win against Eastern power Yale as well as six shutouts. It was the win over Yale that propelled the Bulldogs to the national spotlight.[6]

The Bulldogs were anchored by two All-American ends, captain Chick Shiver and consensus All-American Tom Nash.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
1927-10-01 Virginiadagger Sanford FieldAthens, GA W 32–0  
1927-10-08 at Yale* Yale BowlNew Haven, CT W 14–10  
1927-10-15 Furman* Sanford Field • Athens W 32–0  
1927-10-22 vs. Auburn McClung StadiumColumbus, GA (Deep South's Oldest Rivalry) W 33–0  
1927-10-29 at Tulane New Orleans, LA W 31–0  
1927-11-05 at Florida Jacksonville, FL W 28–0  
1927-11-12 Clemson Sanford Field • Athens W 32–0  
1927-11-19 Mercer * Sanford Field • Athens W 26–7  
1927-11-24 at Alabama Legion FieldBirmingham, AL W 20–7  
1927-12-03 at Georgia Tech #1 Grant FieldAtlanta, GA L 0–12   38,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.

Season summary[edit]

Preseason[edit]

At the end of last season, one source described Georgia as "probably the hardest hit team in the Southern Conference, losing 14 letter men with the Thanksgiving game."[7]

Week 2: at Yale[edit]

Week 2: Georgia at Yale
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 7 7 0 0 14
Yale 7 3 0 0 10

In the second week of play, Georgia defeated Yale for the first time by the score of 14 to 10.[8] By season's end, both Georgia and Yale were national champions according to various selectors. Walter Eckersall noted the progress of southern football as he reflected on Georgia's victory over Yale; "Old Eli, with its running attack, could do nothing against Georgia, which is represented by two of the finest ends in the country. Nash and Shiver would be valuable assets on any football team."[9]

Week 9: at Alabama[edit]

The game on November 24th against Alabama was the first game played in the newly completed Legion Field and snapped a five-game losing streak against Alabama.

Week 10: at Georgia Tech[edit]

Week 10: Georgia at Georgia Tech
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0
Georgia Tech 0 6 6 0 12

Grant Field was expected to be filled to capacity, the largest crowd ever in the south.[12] One account read "And never in the history of athletics in the Southland has there been an occasion so momentous as this. The football championship of the South and as some may justifiably figure, the nation, will be decided on Saturday in the capital city and native sons will decide it."[13]

In the rain, the Bulldogs were defeated by rival Georgia Tech for the SoCon championship 12 to 0. For the first time this year, neither Nash nor Shiver played particularly well.[14]

Tech's first touchdown came on a pass from Warner Mizell to quarterback Bob Durant. The second one came shortly after Stumpy Thomason returned an interception 57 yards to Georgia's 22-yard line.[10][11] Thomason scored on a 13-yard end run.[11]

The starting lineup for Georgia against Tech: Nash (left end), Morris (left tackle), Jacobson (left guard), Boland (center), Smith (right guard), Lautenheizer (right tackle), Shiver (right end), Johnson (quarterback), Estes (left halfback), Dudley (right halfback), McCrary (fullback).[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1927 Georgia Bulldogs Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Football National Championships". UGA Sports Communications. 2006-08-02. Retrieved 2007-01-12. 
  3. ^ "Past Division I-A Football National Champions". ncaa.org. Archived from the original on 2007-01-12. Retrieved 2007-01-13. 
  4. ^ wilson.engr.wisc.edu/rsfc/oth_sites/rate/berryman-champs.pdf
  5. ^ "Conference Championships – Southern Conference". College Football Data Warehouse. 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-13. 
  6. ^ Jon Nelson (August 1, 2010). 100 Things Bulldogs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die. Triumph Books. p. 25. Retrieved March 25, 2015 – via Google books.  open access publication - free to read
  7. ^ "Many Faces Pass From Grid After Thanksgiving Fights". Hattiesburg American. November 23, 1926. p. 3. 
  8. ^ "Georgia Whips Yale Bulldogs". The Lincoln Star. October 9, 1927. p. 14. Retrieved March 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  9. ^ Patrick Garbin. About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. p. 46 – via Google books.  open access publication - free to read
  10. ^ a b Patrick Garbin. About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. p. 44. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Biggest Upset of Southern Conference Spoils 'U' Mark". Oakland Tribune. December 4, 1927. p. 33. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  12. ^ "Georgia 11 Meets Ancient Tech Foes". Ironwood Daily Globe. December 3, 1927. p. 5. Retrieved August 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  13. ^ Lawrence Perry (December 2, 1927). "Georgia and Georgia Tech Clash in Annual Grid Classic". Oakland Tribune. p. 43. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  14. ^ "All-American Debate Boils Over Nation". The Bismarck Tribune. December 7, 1927. p. 8. Retrieved July 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read