1930 Tulane Green Wave football team

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1930 Tulane Green Wave football
SoCon co-champion
Conference Southern Conference
1930 record 8–1 (5–0 SoCon)
Head coach Bernie Bierman (4th season)
Offensive scheme Single wing
Captain Lloyd Roberts
Home stadium Tulane Stadium
(Capacity: 35,000)[1]
Uniform
30stulaneuniform.png
Seasons
← 1929
1931 →
1930 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Alabama + 8 0 0     10 0 0
Tulane + 5 0 0     8 1 0
Tennessee 6 1 0     9 1 0
Duke 4 1 1     8 1 2
Vanderbilt 5 2 0     8 2 0
Maryland 4 2 0     7 5 0
Florida 4 2 1     6 3 1
North Carolina 4 2 2     5 3 2
Clemson 3 2 0     8 2 0
Georgia 3 2 1     7 2 1
Kentucky 4 3 0     5 3 0
South Carolina 4 3 0     6 4 0
VPI 2 3 1     5 3 1
Mississippi A&M 2 3 0     2 7 0
Georgia Tech 2 4 1     2 6 1
LSU 2 4 0     2 6 1
Virginia 2 5 0     4 6 0
Sewanee 1 4 0     3 6 1
NC State 1 5 0     2 8 0
Ole Miss 1 5 0     3 5 1
Auburn 1 6 0     3 7 0
Washington and Lee 0 4 1     3 6 1
VMI 0 5 0     3 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1930 Tulane Green Wave football team represented Tulane University during the 1930 college football season. Coached by Bernie Bierman, the Green Wave posted an 8–1 record and shared a conference championship with national champion Alabama. Tulane outscored its opponents 263–30.[2]

The team lost its only game to Big Ten champion Northwestern. Times-Picayune sports writer Pete Baird called the 1930 squad “the best team that ever represented the Olive and Blue”.

Before the season[edit]

Lloyd Roberts was elected captain.[3][4] The backfield was all new, including quarterback Red Dawson, halfbacks Wop Glover and Don Zimmerman, and fullback Nollie Felts.[5][6]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
September 27 Southwestern Louisiana* Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA W 84–0   15,000
October 4 at Northwestern* Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL L 14–0   35,000
October 11 vs. Texas A&M* Fair Park Stadium • Dallas, TX W 19–9   12,000
October 18 Birmingham–Southern* Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA W 21–0   12,000
October 25 at Georgia Tech Grant FieldAtlanta, GA W 28–0   -
November 1 Mississippi A&M Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA W 53–0   -
November 8 Auburn Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA W 21–0   -
November 15 Georgia Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA W 25–0   30,000
November 27 LSU Tulane Stadium • New Orleans, LA (Battle for the Flag) W 12–7   38,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.

Season summary[edit]

Southwestern Louisiana[edit]

With 15,000 fans at opening day, Tulane defeated Southwestern Louisiana 84–0.[7] Elmer Massey scored three times and Zimmerman twice.[7]

Northwestern[edit]

Tulane at Northwestern
1 2 3 4 Total
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0
Northwestern 0 14 0 0 14
  • Date: October 4
  • Location: Dyche Stadium
    Evanston, IL
  • Game attendance: 35,000

Sources:[8]

Tulane suffered its only loss to Big Ten co-champion Northwestern, 14–0.[n 1] The first score came when a Red Dawson pass was intercepted by Hank Bruder, returned 45 yards for a touchdown.[7] Bruder also got the next touchdown.[8]

Texas A&M[edit]

Tulane at Texas A&M
1 2 3 4 Total
Tulane 0 7 12 0 19
Texas A&M 2 0 0 7 9
  • Date: October 11
  • Location: Dallas, TX
  • Game attendance: 12,000

Sources:[7]

In Dallas, Tulane won 19–9 over Texas A&M. Wop Glover ran for two touchdowns.[9] The Aggies took an early 2–0 lead off a safety from a blocked Felts punt.[7] Glover then ran 62 yards, sweeping around left end after a fake pass, behind a devastating block by Dalrymple.[7] Glover's other touchdown was a 3-yard run.[7] Dawson threw to Dalrymple for 31 yards and the last Tulane touchdown.[7] The Aggies managed a final score against Tulane's reserves.[7]

Birmingham–Southern[edit]

Tulane won over Birmingham–Southern in a tough game, 21–0. Don Zimmerman broke open the game with a 53-yard touchdown run.[7]

The starting lineup was Holland (left end), McCance (left tackle), Bodenger (left guard), Roberts (center), Scafide (right guard), DeColigny (right tackle), Dalrymple (right end), Dawson (quarterback), Glover (left halfback), Massey (right halfback), Felts (fullback).[10]

Georgia Tech[edit]

Tulane at Georgia Tech
1 2 3 4 Total
Tulane 7 14 0 7 28
Ga. Tech 0 0 0 0 0

Sources:[7]

Tulane scored its first victory over Georgia Tech on Grant Field 28–0 . Zimmerman got the first touchdown.[11] He set up a second touchdown by Felts.[7]

Mississippi A&M[edit]

Zimmerman's punt return against the Mississippi Aggies.

Zimmerman also ran a punt back 69 yards against Mississippi A&M, as Tulane won 53–0.

The starting lineup was Holland (left end), McCance (left tackle), Mangum (left guard), Roberts (center), Scafide (right guard), Upton (right tackle), Dalrymple (right end), Dawson (quarterback), Glover (left halfback), Zimmerman (right halfback), Felts (fullback).[12]

Auburn[edit]

The Green Wave defeated the Auburn Tigers 21–0. Times-Picayune writer Bill Keefe wrote that Nollie Felts played "as fine a game as any back ever played".[7]

The starting lineup was Holland (left end), Upton (left tackle), Bodenger (left guard), Roberts (center), McCormick (right guard), DeColigny (right tackle), Dalrymple (right end), Dawson (quarterback), Glover (left halfback), Zimmerman (right halfback), Felts (fullback).[13]

Georgia[edit]

Georgia at Tulane
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0
Tulane 0 6 6 13 25

Sources:[14]

Tulane beat the Georgia Bulldogs 25–0 in the mud, sealing the conference championship.[14] In the last half minute of the first quarter, Zimmerman ran 26 yards for a touchdown.[14]

The starting lineup was Holland (left end), McCance (left tackle), Bodenger (left guard), Roberts (center), Scafide (right guard), Upton (right tackle), Dalrymple (right end), Dawson (quarterback), Zimmerman (left halfback), Glover (right halfback), Felts (fullback).[14][15]

LSU[edit]

LSU at Tulane
1 2 3 4 Total
LSU 0 0 0 7 7
Tulane 0 7 0 6 13

Sources:

Tulane closed the season by eking out a win over LSU, 12–7. Huey P. Long cheered on the Tigers.[16]

The starting lineup was Holland (left end), McCance (left tackle), Bodenger (left guard), Roberts (center), Scafide (right guard), Upton (right tackle), Dalrymple (right end), Dawson (quarterback), Glover (left halfback), Zimmerman (right halfback), Felts (fullback).[17]

Postseason[edit]

Both Alabama and Tulane claimed SoCon titles. Dalrymple and Roberts made composite All-Southern.[18] Zimmerman and Bodenger made second-team.

Players[edit]

Depth chart[edit]

The following chart provides a visual depiction of Tulane's lineup during the 1930 season with games started at the position reflected in parenthesis. The chart mimics a single wing on offense.

Line[edit]

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown
44 Maury Bodenger guard New Orleans
41 Thomas Cunningham tackle Pine Bluff, Arkansas
33 Jerry Dalrymple end Arkadelphia, Arkansas
35 Calvert DeColigny tackle New Orleans
24 William Drawe end New Orleans
38 William Featherngill tackle Independence, Kansas
19 Vernon Haynes end Arkansas City, Arkansas
39 Doyless Hill center Sand Springs, Oklahoma
21 Jack Holland end Shreveport
30 Winnie Lodrigues center
20 Doyle Magee end Franklinton
32 Mangum guard
40 Elmer McCance tackle
34 John McCormick guard Monroe
23 William Penney guard Guatemala City, C. A.
36 John Read center Picayune, Mississippi
45 Lloyd Roberts center
42 John Scafide guard Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
43 Claggert Upton tackle New Orleans
31 Sam Zemurray tackle New Orleans

Backfield[edit]

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown
26 Red Dawson quarterback River Falls, Wisconsin
37 Nollie Felts fullback Hattiesburg, Mississippi
15 Wop Glover halfback Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
12 George Haik halfback Bogalusa
27 James Hodgins halfback Shreveport
11 Adolph Jastram halfback New Orleans
17 Harold Lemmon fullback Patterson
22 Elmer Massey halfback
29 Francis Payne fullback Winterville, Mississippi
14 Will Pat Richardson quarterback Ponchatoula
25 Edward Tschirn halfback New Orleans
7 Hugh Whatley halfback Rayville
18 Don Zimmerman halfback Lake Charles

Unlisted[edit]

Number Player
10 Guy
13 Percy
28 Pierce

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Wildcats lost only to national champion Notre Dame.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryan Whirty (June 26, 2012). "The History of Tulane Stadium(s)". Gambit Magazine. Retrieved September 11, 2012. 
  2. ^ http://tulanegreenwave.com/sports/2016/6/13/sports-m-footbl-archive-081910aai-html.aspx
  3. ^ "22 Captains To Lead Grid Teams". The Index-Journal. September 12, 1930. p. 9. Retrieved March 17, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ "Bring On The Wildcats". Chicago Tribune. September 28, 1930. p. 4.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "1930 Tulane 25 Georgia 0 - Part 1". 
  6. ^ "1930 Tulane 25 Georgia 0 - Part 2". 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ray Schmidt. "The Green Wave of 1930" (PDF). College Football Historical Society Newsletter. 25 (3): 11. 
  8. ^ a b "Hank Bruder Wins From Tulane 14-0". The Jacksonville Daily Journal. October 5, 1930. p. 10. Retrieved June 2, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ The Associated Press (October 13, 1930). "Savoldi Heads Gridiron Heroes". Kingsport Times. p. 2. Retrieved May 27, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ "Tulane University Football Program; Tulane vs. Birmingham Southern :: Tulane University Football Programs". 
  11. ^ "Don Zimmerman". 
  12. ^ "Tulane University Football Program; Tulane vs. Mississippi A.&M. :: Tulane University Football Programs". 
  13. ^ "Tulane University Football Program; Tulane vs Auburn :: Tulane University Football Programs". 
  14. ^ a b c d "Bulldog Team Fails To Stop Big Green Wave". The Anniston Star. November 16, 1930. p. 12. Retrieved June 2, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane%3A22908/datastream/PDF/view
  16. ^ "Huey P. Long Startling As A Football Fan". Cumberland Evening Times. December 4, 1930. p. 12. Retrieved June 2, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ https://digitallibrary.tulane.edu/islandora/object/tulane%3A23004/datastream/PDF/view
  18. ^ Dillow Graham (December 4, 1930). "Unanimous Vote of Coaches and Sports Writers Places Dodd At Top of Quarterback Candidates". The Kingsport Times. p. 2. Retrieved March 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read