1931 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1931 Michigan Wolverines football
1931 Michigan Wolverines football team.jpg
Big Ten co-champion
Conference Big Ten Conference
1931 record 8–1–1 (5–1 Big Ten)
Head coach Harry Kipke (3rd year)
MVP Bill Hewitt
Captain Roy Hudson
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1930 1932 »
1931 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Purdue + 5 1 0     9 1 0
Michigan + 5 1 0     8 1 1
Northwestern + 5 1 0     7 1 1
Ohio State 4 2 0     6 3 0
Minnesota 3 2 0     7 3 0
Wisconsin 3 3 0     5 4 1
Indiana 1 4 1     2 5 1
Chicago 1 4 0     2 6 1
Iowa 0 3 1     1 6 1
Illinois 0 6 0     2 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from Dickinson System

The 1931 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1931 college football season. In their third year under head coach was Harry Kipke, the Wolverines compiled a record of 8-1-1 record (5-1 Big Ten), outscored opponents 181 to 27, and finished the season in a three-way tie with Purdue and Northwestern for first place in the Big Ten Conference. Defensively, the team shut out eight of ten opponents, allowed an average of only 2.7 points per game, and did not allow opponents to score a point in its final six games. After losing to Ohio State on October 17, 1931, the Wolverines went 22 games and nearly three years before losing another game on October 6, 1934.

Individual players of note on the 1931 Michigan team include center Maynard Morrison, who was selected as a first-team All-American by Grantland Rice for Collier's Weekly and by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). Bill Hewitt was selected as the teams Most Valuable Player and a first-team All-Big Ten halfback by the United Press (UP). Ivy Williamson was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten end by both the UP and Associated Press (AP).

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 3, 1931 Central State Teachers* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 27–0   13,169
October 3, 1931 Michigan State Normal* Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 34–0   13,169
October 10, 1931 Chicago Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 13–7   17,284
October 17, 1931 Ohio State Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI L 7–20   58,026
October 24, 1931 at Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL W 35–0   33,496
October 31, 1931 at Princeton* Palmer StadiumPrinceton, NJ W 21–0   14,797
November 7, 1931 Indiana Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 22–0   26,410
November 14, 1931 Michigan State* Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI T 0–0   35,844
November 21, 1931 Minnesotadagger Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 6–0   37,251
November 28, 1931 Wisconsin Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 16–0   9,190
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Week 1: Central State Teachers[edit]

Week 1: Central State Teachers at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Central State Teachers 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

Michigan opened its 1931 season with a football doubleheader on October 3, 1931. The games attracted a crowd of nearly 80,000, most of whom were high school students invited by the university to attend the game without charge.[1]

In the first game, Michigan's backup players defeated the team from Central State Teachers College (now known as Central Michigan University) by a score of 27 to 0. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by halfback Jack Heston (the son of former Michigan star Willie Heston), fullback Roderick Cox (1933 NCAA champion in the hammer throw), end Ted Petoskey, and substitute halfback Herbert Schmidt. Petoskey also kicked three points after touchdown.[1]

Michigan's starting lineup against the Central State Teachers was Ted Petoskey (left end), DuVal Goldsmith (left tackle), John Kowalik (left guard), Thomas Cooke (center), Leslie Frisk (right guard), Cecil Cantrill (right tackle), Norm Daniels (right end), Louis Westover (quarterback), Heston (left halfback), Estel Tessmer (right halfback), and Roderick Cox (fullback).[1]

Week 1: Michigan Normal[edit]

Week 1: Michigan Normal at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan Normal 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

In the second game of the doubleheader, Michigan's first-team players defeated Michigan Normal by a 34 to 0 score. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by halfback Herman Everhardus (one-yard run in second quarter), backup halfback Jack Heston (16-yard run in second quarter), guard Stanley Hozer (four-yard run in second quarter), end Ted Petoskey (25-yard pass from William Renner), and halfback Stanley Fay (short run in second half). Hozer kicked two points after touchdown, and Petoskey and Omer LaJeunesse kicked one each.[1]

Michigan's starting lineup against Michigan Normal was Bill Hewitt (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Hozer (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), LaJeunesse (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Harry Newman (quarterback), Everhardus (left halfback), Stanley Fay (right halfback), and Roy Hudson (fullback).[1]

Week 2: Chicago[edit]

Week 2: Chicago at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Chicago 0 0 7 0 7
Michigan 0 13 0 0 13

On October 10, 1931, Michigan defeated Amos Alonzo Stagg's Chicago Maroons by a 13 to 7 score. Both of Michigan's touchdowns were scored in the second quarter on passes thrown by Harry Newman. Stanley Fay caught the first one, and Roy Hudson the second one. Newman also kicked a point after touchdown.[2]

Michigan's starting lineup against Chicago was Bill Hewitt (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Leslie Douglass (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), Omer LaJeunesse (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Louis Westover (quarterback), Stanley Fay (left halfback), Jack Heston (right halfback), and Roy Hudson (fullback).[2]

Week 3: Ohio State[edit]

Week 3: Ohio State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Ohio State 7 0 6 7 20
Michigan 7 0 0 0 7

On October 17, 1931, Michigan suffered its only loss of the season, falling to Ohio State by a 20 to 7 score. Jack Heston fumbled the opening kickoff at Michigan's 24-yard line. The defense held, but Heston then fumbled again on the next drive at Michigan's 31-yard line. Bill Carroll then ran for a touchdown in the first quarter. Ohio State's sophomore quarterback Carl Cramer also scored two touchdowns, including a 42-yard punt return in the fourth quarter. Michigan's only touchdown was scored by end Ivy Williamson with DuVal Goldsmith kicking the extra point.[3] After losing to Ohio State, the Wolverines went 22 games and nearly three years before losing another game.

Michigan's starting lineup against Ohio State was Bill Hewitt (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Omer LaJeunesse (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), John Kowalik (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Harry Newman (quarterback), Jack Heston (left halfback), Stanley Fay (right halfback), and Roy Hudson (fullback).[3]

Week 4: at Illinois[edit]

Week 4: Michigan at Illinois
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0
Illinois 0 0 0 0 0

On October 24, 1931, Michigan defeated Illinois by a 35 to 0 score. Michigan's 35 points was the most scored against an Illinois team under head coach Robert Zuppke. Fullback Bill Hewitt averaged over six yards per carry on 24 carries. Michigan's five touchdowns were scored by Stanley Fay (2), Jack Heston John Kowalik, and Harry Newman (45-yard interception return). Ted Petoskey kicked two points after touchdown, and Newman kicked three.[4]

Michigan's starting lineup against Ohio State was Petoskey (left end), Francis Wistert (left tackle), Stanley Hozer (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), Omer LaJeunesse (right guard), Howie Auer (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Estel Tessmer (quarterback), Heston (left halfback), Fay (right halfback), and Hewitt (fullback).[4]

Week 5: at Princeton[edit]

Week 5: Michigan at Princeton
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0
Princeton 0 0 0 0 0

On October 31, 1931, Michigan defeated Princeton by a 21 to 0 score at Palmer Stadium in Princeton, New Jersey. Left halfback Stanley Fay scored two touchdowns for Michigan, and fullback Roy Hudson scored one. Harry Newman kicked two points after touchdown, and Ted Petoskey scored one.[5]

Michigan's starting lineup against Princeton was Ivy Williamson (left end), Tom Samuels (left tackle), Omer LaJeunesse (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), Stanley Hozer (right guard), ___ (right tackle), Ted Petoskey (right end), Bill Hewitt (quarterback), Fay (left halfback), Estel Tessmer (right halfback), and Roy Hudson (fullback).[5]

Week 6: Indiana[edit]

Week 6: Indiana at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

On November 7, 1931, Michigan defeated Indiana by a 22 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Michigan touchdowns were scored by Stanley Fay, Ivy Williamson and Bill Hewitt. Williamson was also credited with a safety. Ted Petoskey and Harry Newman each kicked a point after touchdown.[6]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Petoskey (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Stanley Hozer (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), John Kowalik (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Williamson (right end), Estel Tessmer (quarterback), Fay (left halfback), Roy Hudson (right halfback), and Hewitt (fullback).[6]

Week 7: Michigan State[edit]

Week 7: Michigan State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

On November 14, 1931, Michigan played Michigan State to a scoreless tie at Michigan Stadium. Michigan's starting lineup against Michigan State was Ted Petoskey (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Omer LaJeunesse (left guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Stanley Hozer (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Roy Hudson (quarterback), Jack Heston (left halfback), Stanley Fay (right halfback), and Bill Hewitt (fullback).[7]

Week 8: Minnesota[edit]

Week 8: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 6 0 0 0 6

On November 21, 1931, Michigan defeated Minnesota by a 6 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Michigan's only points came on a 56-yard run by Bill Hewitt in the first quarter. The starting lineup against Minnesota was Ted Petoskey (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Omer LaJeunesse (left guard), Maynard Morrison (center), Stanley Hozer (right guard), Tom Samuels (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Roy Hudson (quarterback), Jack Heston (left halfback), Stanley Fay (right halfback), and Hewitt (fullback).[8]

Week 9: Wisconsin[edit]

Week 9: Wisconsin at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Wisconsin 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

On November 28, 1931, Michigan defeated Wisconsin by a 16 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Michigan touchdowns were scored by Bill Hewitt and Roy Hudson. Hudson also kicked a field goal, and Herman Everhardus kicked an extra point. The starting lineup against Wisconsin was Ted Petoskey (left end), Howie Auer (left tackle), Cecil Cantrill (left guard), Chuck Bernard (center), John Kowalik (right guard), Francis Wistert (right tackle), Ivy Williamson (right end), Harry Newman (quarterback), Everhardus (left halfback), Hudson (right halfback), and Hewitt (fullback).[9]

Scoring summary[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Safeties Total
Points
Stanley Fay 7 0 0 0 42
Roy Hudson 3 0 1 0 21
Ted Petoskey 2 8 0 0 20
Jack Heston 3 0 0 0 18
Bill Hewitt 3 0 0 0 18
Ivy Williamson 2 0 0 1 14
Harry Newman 1 7 0 0 13
Stanley Hozer 1 2 0 0 8
Herman Everhardus 1 1 0 0 7
Roderick Cox 1 0 0 0 6
Herbert Schmidt 1 0 0 0 6
Omer LaJeunesse 0 1 0 0 1
DuVal Goldsmith 0 1 0 0 1
unaccounted 1 0 0 0 6
Totals 25 20 1 1 181

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

Varsity reserves[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

  • Trainer: Ray Roberts[11]
  • Manager: John Sauchuck, assisted by Rehn Nelson, Louis Columbo, Elbert Gage, and William Jones[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Michigan Scores Double Victory Before 80,000". Chicago Tribune. October 4, 1931. pp. 2–5. 
  2. ^ a b "Courageous Maroon Eleven Holds Michigan to 13-7 Score". Chicago Tribune. October 11, 1931. p. 2-1. 
  3. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (October 18, 1931). "Buckeyes New Pilot, Cramer, Leads Attack". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  4. ^ a b Harvey Woodruff (October 25, 1931). "Wolverines Swamp Illini; Worst Defeat Under Zuppke". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  5. ^ a b Westbrook Pegler (November 1, 1931). "Fay Speeds to 2 Touchdowns; Michigan Wins". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  6. ^ a b Edward Burns (November 8, 1931). "Wolverines Rout Hoosier On Two Passes, Fay's Run, Safety". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  7. ^ Charles Bartlett (November 15, 1931). "Michigan State and Michigan Play 0 to 0 Tie". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  8. ^ Wilfrid Smith (November 22, 1931). "Wolverines' Line Halts Gopher Backs; Hewitt Runs 56 Yards". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  9. ^ Harvey Woodruff (November 29, 1931). "Michigan's 2d Half Attack Beats Wisconsin, 16-0: Hewitt, Hudson Break Through To Touchdowns; Latter Drop Kicks 38 Yards". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  10. ^ Born October 10, 1910, died September 5, 1994, last address Lafayette, California
  11. ^ a b c d e f "1931 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved July 5, 2015. 
  12. ^ "All Sections of Country Represented on Team; National Honors Given 1931 Grid Star". Reno Evening Gazette. 1931-12-05. 
  13. ^ "Munn Placed on Rice's All-American Team: Rentner and Morrison Get Honor Posts". The Evening Tribune (Albert Lea, Minn.). 1931-12-18. 
  14. ^ "Dalrymple Highest Vote-Getter In NEA Board's All-American Team". The Daily News (Frederick, Md.). 1931-12-14. 
  15. ^ Bitt, Bill (Central Sports Editor) (1931-12-09). "Real 1931 All-American Team Selected by College Captains". The Evening Independent (Massillon, Ohio). 
  16. ^ Paul Mickelson (November 24, 1931). "Northwestern Places Five Players on Two All-Western Elevens". The Independent, St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP story). p. 4A. 
  17. ^ Claire M. Burcky (December 13, 1931). "Captains Pick Outstanding Players". The Sunday Spartanburg Herald-Journal. p. 32. 
  18. ^ George Kirksey (November 24, 1931). "United Press All Big Ten Selections for 1931". The Indiana Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania). p. 10. 
  19. ^ a b c d "Wally Weber Is Named Backfield Coach at Michigan". The News-Palladium. September 11, 1931. p. 10. 
  20. ^ "Kipke Has Talent Galore for Backs and Ends, But Quarter and Tackle, None". The Ludington Daily News. August 31, 1931. p. 6. 

External links[edit]