1931 World Series

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1931 World Series
Cover of a souvenir program
Team (Wins) Manager(s) Season
St. Louis Cardinals (4) Gabby Street 101–53, .656, GA: 13
Philadelphia Athletics (3) Connie Mack 107–45, .704, GA: ​13 12
DatesOctober 1–10
UmpiresBill Klem (NL), Dick Nallin (AL), Dolly Stark (NL), Bill McGowan (AL)
Hall of FamersUmpire: Bill Klem
Cardinals: Jim Bottomley, Frankie Frisch, Burleigh Grimes, Chick Hafey, Jesse Haines (dnp).
Athletics: Connie Mack (mgr.), Mickey Cochrane, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, Waite Hoyt, Al Simmons.
Broadcast
RadioNBC, CBS
Radio announcersNBC: Graham McNamee, Tom Manning, George Hicks
CBS: Ted Husing
← 1930 World Series 1932 →

The 1931 World Series featured the two-time defending champion Philadelphia Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. The Cardinals beat the Athletics in seven games, a rematch and reversal of fortunes of the previous World Series.

The same two teams faced off during the 1930 World Series and the Athletics were victorious. The only day-to-day player in the Cardinals' lineup who was different in 1931 was the "Wild Horse of the Osage", Pepper Martin—a 27-year-old rookie who had spent seven seasons in the minor leagues. He led his team for the Series in runs scored, hits, doubles, runs batted in and stolen bases, and also made a running catch to stifle a ninth-inning rally by the A's in the final game.

The spitball pitch had been banned by Major League Baseball in 1920, but those still using it at that time were "grandfathered", or permitted to keep throwing it for the balance of their big-league careers. One of those who "wet his pill" still active in 1931 was Burleigh Grimes, with two Series starts, two wins and seven innings of no-hit pitching in Game 3. "Wild" Bill Hallahan started and won the other two for the Cards, and saved Game 7.

The Athletics had captured their third straight American League pennant, winning 107 games (and 313 for 1929–31). But this would prove to be the final World Series for longtime A's manager Connie Mack. As he did after the Boston "Miracle Braves" swept his heavily favored A's in the 1914 Series, Mack would break up this great team by selling off his best players, this time out of perceived economic necessity rather than pique and competition from the short-lived Federal League. It would be the A's last World Series appearance in Philadelphia and it would be 41 years—and two cities—later before the A's would return to the Fall Classic, after their successive moves to Kansas City in 1955 and Oakland in 1968. This would also be the city of Philadelphia's last appearance in the Series until 1950. It was also the last World Series until the 2017 edition in which both teams who had won at least 100 games in the regular season went the maximum seven games.

Summary[edit]

NL St. Louis Cardinals (4) vs. AL Philadelphia Athletics (3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 1 Philadelphia Athletics – 6, St. Louis Cardinals – 2 Sportsman's Park 1:55 38,529[1] 
2 October 2 Philadelphia Athletics – 0, St. Louis Cardinals – 2 Sportsman's Park 1:49 35,947[2] 
3 October 5 St. Louis Cardinals – 5, Philadelphia Athletics – 2 Shibe Park 2:10 32,295[3] 
4 October 6 St. Louis Cardinals – 0, Philadelphia Athletics – 3 Shibe Park 1:58 32,295[4] 
5 October 7 St. Louis Cardinals – 5, Philadelphia Athletics – 1 Shibe Park 1:56 32,295[5] 
6 October 9 Philadelphia Athletics – 8, St. Louis Cardinals – 1 Sportsman's Park 1:57 39,401[6] 
7 October 10 Philadelphia Athletics – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 4 Sportsman's Park 1:57 20,805[7]

Matchups[edit]

Game 1[edit]

Thursday, October 1, 1931 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 6 11 0
St. Louis 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 12 0
WP: Lefty Grove (1–0)   LP: Paul Derringer (0–1)
Home runs:
PHA: Al Simmons (1)
STL: None

The A's scored four runs in the third, enabling Lefty Grove to win Game 1 despite giving up twelve hits, three by Pepper Martin.

Game 2[edit]

Friday, October 2, 1931 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
St. Louis 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 X 2 6 1
WP: Bill Hallahan (1–0)   LP: George Earnshaw (0–1)

Pepper Martin's two hits and two stolen bases, scoring both Cardinal runs, supported Hallahan's three-hit shutout.

Game 3[edit]

Monday, October 5, 1931 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 5 12 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0
WP: Burleigh Grimes (1–0)   LP: Lefty Grove (1–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
PHA: Al Simmons (2)

Grimes pitched a two-hitter and contributed a two-run single in the fourth. He had a shutout until Al Simmons hit a two-run homer with two outs in the ninth.

Game 4[edit]

Tuesday, October 6, 1931 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 X 3 10 0
WP: George Earnshaw (1–1)   LP: Syl Johnson (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
PHA: Jimmie Foxx (1)

George Earnshaw pitched a brilliant two-hit shutout, walking one and striking out eight. Simmons RBI double in the first inning was all Earnshaw needed. Martin had both Cardinal hits.

Game 5[edit]

Wednesday, October 7, 1931 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 5 12 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 9 0
WP: Bill Hallahan (2–0)   LP: Waite Hoyt (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: Pepper Martin (1)
PHA: None

Martin was a thorn in the A's side in the series, getting three hits and four RBI to lead St. Louis to a 5-1 victory. Through five games, Martin leads all regulars with a .667 (12-18) average.

Game 6[edit]

Friday, October 9, 1931 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 8 8 1
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 5 2
WP: Lefty Grove (2–1)   LP: Paul Derringer (0–2)

The Athletics broke a scoreless tie with four runs in the fifth, Grove winning his second game of the series with a five-hitter, tying the series.

Game 7[edit]

Saturday, October 10, 1931 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 7 1
St. Louis 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 X 4 5 0
WP: Burleigh Grimes (2–0)   LP: George Earnshaw (1–2)   Sv: Bill Hallahan (1)
Home runs:
PHA: None
STL: George Watkins (1)

A two-run home run by George Watkins in the third gave the Cardinals a 4-0 lead, but the Athletics scored two in the ninth, Hallahan getting the last out, saving the victory for Grimes.

Despite going 0-6 in Games 6 and 7, Pepper Martin was the leading hitter of the series with a .500 (12-24) batting average.

Composite line score[edit]

1931 World Series (4–3): St. Louis Cardinals (N.L.) over Philadelphia Athletics (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis Cardinals 5 3 2 2 0 3 1 1 2 19 54 4
Philadelphia Athletics 1 0 4 0 4 2 7 0 4 22 50 2
Total attendance: 231,567   Average attendance: 33,081
Winning player's share: $4,468   Losing player's share: $3,023[8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "1931 World Series Game 1 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1931 World Series Game 2 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1931 World Series Game 3 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1931 World Series Game 4 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1931 World Series Game 5 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "1931 World Series Game 6 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. ^ "1931 World Series Game 7 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 14, 2009.

References[edit]

  • Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 137–141. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.
  • Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2139. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.

External links[edit]