1935 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1935 Michigan Wolverines football
Conference Big Ten Conference
1935 record 4–4 (2–3 Big Ten)
Head coach Harry Kipke (7th year)
MVP Bill Renner
Captain Bill Renner
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
← 1934
1936 →
1935 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Minnesota + 5 0 0     8 0 0
#5 Ohio State + 5 0 0     7 1 0
Purdue 3 3 0     4 4 0
Indiana 2 2 1     4 3 1
#16 Northwestern 2 3 1     4 3 1
#18 Iowa 1 2 2     4 2 2
Chicago 2 3 0     4 4 0
Michigan 2 3 0     4 4 0
Illinois 1 4 0     3 5 0
Wisconsin 1 4 0     1 7 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from UP Sports Writers

The 1935 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1935 college football season. In their seventh season under head coach Harry Kipke, the Wolverines compiled a 4–4 record (2–3 against Big Ten Conference opponents, finished in a tie for seventh place in the Big Ten), and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 131 to 68. The team had a 4–1 record after five games, but was shut out in its final three games. Michigan's 40–0 loss to 1935 consensus national champion Minnesota in the annual Little Brown Jug game was the worst defeat suffered by a Michigan Wolverines football team since 1892.

All eight opponents faced by the Wolverines during the 1935 season were led by head coaches who were later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Quarterback Bill Renner was the team captain and also received the team's most valuable player award. End Matt Patanelli was the only Michigan player selected as a first-team player on the 1935 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Halfback Chris Everhardus was the team's leading scorer with 13 points.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 5 Michigan State* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI (Rivalry) L 6–25   32,315
October 12 Indiana Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 7–0   18,533
October 19 at Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI W 20–12   14,381
October 26 at Columbia* Baker FieldNew York, NY W 19–7   24,901
November 2 Penn*dagger Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 16–6   30,751
November 9 at Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL (Series) L 0–3   28,136
November 16 Minnesota Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Little Brown Jug) L 0–40   32,029
November 23 Ohio State Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Rivalry) L 0–38   53,322
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Michigan State[edit]

Week 1: Michigan State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 7 6 6 6 25
Michigan 6 0 0 0 6

On October 5, 1935, Michigan opened its 1935 season with its annual rivalry game against the Michigan State Spartans. The Spartans had defeated the Wolverines in 1934 for the first time since 1915. Led by head coach Charlie Bachman and left halfback Kurt Warmbein, the Spartans again defeated the Wolverienes, 25 to 6. It was the first time the Spartans had defeated the Wolverines in consecutive games. Michigan's only touchdown was scored in the first quarter. Lining up for a placekick, Bill Renner threw a short touchdown pass to Cedric Sweet. Chris Everhardus missed the kick for extra point. Despite the one-sided score, Tod Rockwell opined in the Detroit Free Press that the 1935 Wolverines appeared to be a much better team than the 1934 Wolverines that had compiled a 1–7 record.[1]

Indiana[edit]

Week 2: Indiana at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 0 7 0 0 7

On October 12, 1935, Michigan defeated Bo McMillin's Indiana Hoosiers, 7 to 0, at Michigan Stadium. The victory was Michigan's first over a Big Ten Conference opponents since the 1933 season. Indiana out-gained Michigan, 296 to 113, but the Wolverines held the Hoosiers scoreless. The only touchdown of the game was scored in the second quarter when Indiana fumbled a punt and Michigan end Matt Patanelli fell on the loose ball in the Indiana end zone. Johnny Viergever kicked the extra point.[2]

at Wisconsin[edit]

Week 3: Michigan at Wisconsin
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 13 7 0 0 20
Wisconsin 0 0 6 6 12

On October 19, 1935, Michigan defeated Clarence Spears' Wisconsin Badgers, 20 to 12, at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin. Quarterback Bill Renner threw three touchdown passes (two in the first quarter, one in the second) to lead Michigan to a 20 to 0 lead at halftime. Renner threw touchdown passes covering 10 yards to Johnny Smithers, 13 yards to Mike Savage, and 25 yards to Chris Everhardus. Johnny Viergever and Chris Everhardus each kicked one extra point. An injury to Renner's hand late in the second quarter slowed the Wolverines in the second half, and Wisconsin scored twice in the second half to narrow the gap.[3]

at Columbia[edit]

Week 4: Michigan at Columbia
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 12 0 7 0 19
Columbia Lions 0 0 7 0 7

On October 26, 1935, Michigan played Lou Little's Columbia Lions at Baker Field in New York. Little's teams had lost only one game in each of the 1933 and 1934 seasons and had defeated Stanford in the 1934 Rose Bowl. Michigan defeated the Lions, 19 to 7. On the opening kickoff, Columbia fumbled a backward pass, and Matt Patanelli recovered the ball for Michigan at Columbia's 17-yard line. Johnny Smithers scored three plays later on a short run. Chris Everhardus returned a punt 42 yards for Michigan's second touchdown, giving Michigan a 13 to 0 lead in the first quarter. Michigan and Columbia each scored touchdowns in the third quarter. Michigan's final tally came on a five-yard touchdown pass from Bill Renner to Ernest Johnson, and Steve Remias kicked the extra point. Al Barabas, star of the 1934 Rose Bowl, ran 74 yards for Columbia's only touchdown.[4]

Penn[edit]

Week 5: Penn at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Penn 0 0 0 6 6
Michigan 6 7 0 3 16
  • Date: November 2
  • Location: Michigan Stadium
  • Game attendance: 30,751
  • Referee: Gardner

On November 2, 1935, Michigan defeated Harvey Harman's Penn Quakers, 16 to 6, before a homecoming crowd of 30,751 at Michigan Stadium. Penn had won its prior two games by a combined score of 101 to 0, and Michigan's victory was considered "an outstanding upset."[5] Michigan led 13 to 0 at halftime. Bill Renner threw a three-yard touchdown pass to Arthur Valpey in the first quarter, and Cedric Sweet ran 18 yards for a touchdown in the second quarter. Steve Remnias kicked an extra point. Bill Kurlish scored for Penn in the fourth quarter, and Johnny Viergever added a field goal for Michigan.[5]

at Illinois[edit]

Week 6: Michigan at Illinois
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0
Illinois 0 3 0 0 3

On November 9, 1935, Michigan lost to Robert Zuppke's Illinois Fighting Illini, 3 to 0, before a homecoming crowd of 28,136 at a rainy Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois. In a low-scoring match, Lowell Spurgeon kicked a 22-yard field goal for Illinois in the second quarter. Michigan's offense was stifled by the Illinois defense. The Wolverines gained only 10 yards of total offense and secured only one first down, that one coming on an Illinois penalty for running into the punter in the third quarter. Michigan threw only two forward passes, with either one or both of them resulting in an interception.[6]

Minnesota[edit]

Week 7: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 20 7 7 6 40
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 16
  • Location: Michigan Stadium
  • Game attendance: 32,029
  • Referee: Masker

On November 16, 1935, Michigan lost to Bernie Bierman's Minnesota Golden Gophers, 40–0, before a crowd of 32,029 at Michigan Stadium. It was Minnesota's 23rd consecutive game without a loss and the worst defeat in the history of the Michigan football program since a 44–0 loss to Cornell in 1892. Minnesota gained 432 rushing yards to 99 for Michigan and also held Michigan to 35 passing yards. Clarence Thompson returned a kickoff 85 yards for a touchdown. Andrew Uram scored two touchdowns on runs of 60 and 73 yards. Sheldon Beise also scored two touchdowns. Vernal LeVoir scored on a 30-yard touchdown reception and kicked four extra points.[7]

Ohio State[edit]

Week 8: Ohio State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Ohio State 13 6 6 13 38
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 23
  • Location: Michigan Stadium
  • Game attendance: 53,322
  • Referee: Lourie

On November 23, 1935, Michigan lost to Francis Schmidt's Ohio State Buckeyes, 38-0, before a crowd of 53,322 at Michigan Stadium. It remains the worst defeat for a Michigan team in the history of the Michigan–Ohio State football rivalry. Michigan was held to 12 rushing yards and 73 passing yards. Richard Heekin scored two touchdowns for Ohio State. Tippy Dye returned a punt 65 yards for a touchdown. Johnny Bettridge and Frank Boucher also scored touchdowns for Ohio State.[8] Ohio State finished the season tied with Minnesota for the Big Ten championship and ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll.

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

The following 26 players received varsity letters for their participation on the 1935 Michigan football team. Players who started at least four games are shown in bold.[9] For players who were starters, the list also includes the number of games started by position.[10]

  • Vincent J. Aug, halfback, junior, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • William C. Barclay, halfback, sophomore, Flint, Michigan
  • Frank S. Bissell, guard, junior, Hyannisport, Massachusetts - started 7 games at left guard, 1 game at right guard
  • Robert D. Campbell, halfback, junior, Ionia, Michigan - started 1 game at left halfback
  • Chris Everhardus, halfback, junior, Kalamazoo, Michigan[11] - started 5 games at left halfback
  • Jesse G. Garber, guard, junior, New York, New York - started 1 game at right guard
  • Cloyce E. Hanshue, guard, junior, Kalamazoo, Michigan - started 2 games at right tackle
  • Ernest C. Johnson, end, senior, Grand Rapids, Michigan - started 1 game at right end
  • Melvin G. Kramer, tackle, sophomore, Toledo, Ohio[12] - started 6 games at right tackle
  • James H. Lincoln, tackle, sophomore, Harbor Beach, Michigan
  • Earle B. Luby, tackle, sophomore, Chicago, Illinois[13] - started 1 game at left tackle
  • Earl J. Meyers, halfback, junior, Detroit, Michigan - started 1 game at right guard
  • Matt Patanelli, end, junior, Elkhart, Indiana - started 8 games at left end
  • Ernest A. Pederson, guard, junior, Grand Blanc, Michigan
  • Steve Remias, fullback, senior, Chicago, Illinois - started 1 game at fullback
  • William Renner, quarterback, senior, Youngstown, Ohio - started 8 games at quarterback
  • Joe Rinaldi, center, sophomore, Elkhart, Indiana - started 1 game at center
  • Stark Ritchie, halfback, sophomore, Battle Creek, Michigan - started 2 games at left halfback
  • Michael Savage, end, senior, Dearborn, Michigan - started 5 games at right end
  • Stanton J. Schuman, center, junior, Winnetka, Illinois[14] - started 1 game at left guard, 1 game at right guard
  • John A. Smithers, halfback, sophomore, Elkhart, Indiana - started 8 games at right halfback
  • Solomon Sobsey, end, sophomore, Brooklyn, New York[15] - started 3 games at right guard
  • Cedric Sweet, fullback, junior, Fremont, Michigan[16] - started 7 games at fullback
  • Arthur Valpey, end, sophomore, Detroit, Michigan - 2 games at right end
  • John D. Viergever, tackle, senior, Algonac, Michigan[17] - started 7 games at left tackle
  • Harry T. Wright, center, junior, Mt. Clemens, Michigan - started 6 games at center

Varsity reserves[edit]

The following six players were identified as varsity reserves on the roster of the 1935 Michigan football team.[9]

Scoring leaders[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Points
Chris Everhardus 2 1 0 13
Johnny Smithers 2 0 0 12
Cedric Sweet 2 0 0 12
Ernest Johnson 1 0 0 6
Matt Patanelli 1 0 0 6
Mike Savage 1 0 0 6
Arthur Valpey 1 0 0 6
Johnny Viergever 0 2 1 5
Steve Remias 0 2 0 2
Totals 10 5 1 68

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Tod Rockwell (October 6, 1935). "State Scores in Every Period to Beat Michigan, 25 to 6: Spartan Line Leads Charge to 4 Markers". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 6. 
  2. ^ Tod Rockwell (October 13, 1935). "Michigan Beats Indiana, 7-0, for First Big 10 Victory Since '33: Matt Patanelli Recovers Fumbled Punt for Score". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 4. 
  3. ^ Tod Rockwell (October 20, 1935). "Renner Passes U. of M. to 20-12 Victory Over Badgers: His Passes in First Half Bring All 3 Touchdowns". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 4. 
  4. ^ Tod Rockwell (October 27, 1935). "Renner Guides Michigan to 19-7 Victory Over Columbia: First Quarter Offense Nets Two Touchdowns". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 4. 
  5. ^ a b Tod Rockwell (November 3, 1935). "Michigan Defeats Penn, 16-6: U. of M. Linemen Check Vaunted Quaker Backs". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 2. 
  6. ^ Tod Rockwell (November 10, 1935). "Illini Beat U. of M., 3-0: Loss First in Big Ten for Wolverine Eleven". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 3. (The game's statistical summary reflects two interceptions; the game narrative references only one interception.)
  7. ^ Tod Rockwell (November 17, 1935). "Minnesota Hands U. of M. Worst Defeat in 43 Years, 40-0: Long Touchdown Runs Feature 'M' Downfall". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 3. 
  8. ^ Tod Rockwell. "Ohio State Routs U. of M., 38 to 0, to Share Big Ten Title: Bucks' Power Offense Rides Over Michigan". Detroit Free Press. pp. Sports 1, 3. 
  9. ^ a b "University of Michigan Football Rosters: 1935". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. 
  10. ^ "1935 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. 
  11. ^ Chris Everhardus, born April 12, 1915, died March 1982, last address in Ann Arbor, Michigan
  12. ^ Melvin G. Kramer, born September 16, 1915, died September 13, 1987, SSN issued Ohio, last address Gadsden, Alabama
  13. ^ Earle B. Luby, born February 26, 1916, died February 14, 1995, SSN issued Michigan, last address Redding, California
  14. ^ Stanton Schuman, born January 28, 1915, died March 11, 2007, SSN issued Michigan, last address Glencoe, Illinois
  15. ^ Solomon Sobsey, born May 24, 1915, died January 18, 1999, SSN issued New York, last address Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  16. ^ Cedric Sweet, born July 16, 1914, died October 1984, last address Southfield, Michigan
  17. ^ John D. Viergever, born July 16, 1913, died November 30, 1989, last address Fremont, Michigan
  18. ^ Robert Y. Amrine, born March 14, 1914, died October 3, 1993, SSN issued Ohio, last address Polson, Montana
  19. ^ Frederick C. Ziem, born March 17, 1916, died March 22, 2000, SSN issued Michigan, last address Commerce Township, Michigan
  20. ^ The 1936 Michiganensian, at page 291, identifies seven assistant football coaches: Fielding H. Yost, Ray Courtright, Cliff Keen, Ray Fisher, "Wallie Weber," Bennie Oosterbaan, and Franklin Cappon.

External links[edit]