1935 New York Yankees season

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1935 New York Yankees
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Jacob Ruppert
General manager(s)Ed Barrow
Manager(s)Joe McCarthy
Local televisionnone
Local radionone
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The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

Offseason[edit]

  • February 26, 1935: Babe Ruth was released by the Yankees.[1]

Regular season[edit]

Once again, the Yankees finished second best in the American League, although they came within three games of the eventual world champions Detroit Tigers. This team was just a year away from starting a 4-year dominance of baseball greatness.

Although Lefty Gomez (12–15) fell off dramatically from his form from the previous four seasons, the Yanks still had the best pitching in the league. The New York staff led the AL in both ERA (3.60) and strikeouts (594). Red Ruffing was the top Yankee winner (16–11) for the first time in five years, followed by Johnny Broaca (15–7), a solid 25-year-old pitcher Johnny Allen (13–6), Johnny Murphy (10–5) and Vito Tamulis (10–5) were also consistent winners.

Before the season, the Yanks released a legend Babe Ruth. Ruth, who never cared for Joe McCarthy, had asked Yankee owner Jake Ruppert, if he, Ruth, could manage the team. Ruppert steadfastly refused, and Ruth then asked to be set free. The Yanks worked out a deal with the Boston Braves in which Ruth would join the Braves in many capacities. So when Babe left the Yankees, it was more or less on amicable terms. His departure rendered the club, now Ruthless for the first time since 1919, short on color; home attendance sank to a partly 657,508. second lowest in Yankee Stadium.

Lou Gehrig (30 HRs, 119 RBIs, .329) was the only legitimate Yankees power hitter. He led the league in runs scored (125) and walks (132). That was the highest walk total of Gehrig's career-pitchers tended to work around Lou. Earle Combs known as both "The Kentucky Colonel" and "The Mail Carrier" wrapped up his great career. George Selkirk (11 HRs, 94 RBIs, .312) played Ruth's old right field position and performed splendidly. Another youngster Red Rolfe, became the third baseman and hit .300. This Yankee edition still had power, setting a major-league record for the most solo home runs in a single game – six. This was in a June 1 game with the Boston Red Sox (Dickey hit two, Frank Crosetti hit one, Ben Chapman hit one, Selkirk hit one and Rolfe hit one).

This young Yankee club showed real promise. But the team appeared to very much need another slugger to aid Gehrig and also to relieve some of the emotional emptiness that the team and the city of New York felt in Ruth's absence.

Season standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB
Detroit Tigers 93 58 .616 --
New York Yankees 89 60 .597 3
Cleveland Indians 82 71 .536 12
Boston Red Sox 78 75 .510 16
Chicago White Sox 74 78 .487 19½
Washington Senators 67 86 .438 27
St. Louis Browns 65 87 .428 28½
Philadelphia Athletics 58 91 .389 34

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1935 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 13–9 9–13–1 9–13 9–12 16–6 10–12 12–10
Chicago 9–13 10–12 11–11 9–11 12–10 11–11–1 12–10
Cleveland 13–9–1 12–10 7–15–1 8–14 12–10 15–6–1 15–7
Detroit 13–9 11–11 15–7–1 11–11 14–5 17–5 12–10
New York 12–9 11–9 14–8 11–11 14–6 12–10 15–7
Philadelphia 6–16 10–12 10–12 5–14 6–14 11–11 10–12
St. Louis 12–10 11–11–1 6–15–1 5–17 10–12 11–11 10–11–1
Washington 10–12 10–12 7–15 10–12 7–15 12–10 11–10–1


Roster[edit]

1935 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Bill Dickey 120 448 125 .279 14 81
1B Lou Gehrig 149 535 176 .329 30 119
2B Tony Lazzeri 130 477 130 .273 13 83
3B Red Rolfe 149 639 192 .300 5 67
SS Frankie Crosetti 87 305 78 .256 8 50
OF Ben Chapman 140 553 160 .289 8 74
OF George Selkirk 128 491 153 .312 11 94
OF Jess Hill 107 392 115 .293 4 33

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Joe Glenn 17 43 10 .233 0 6

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Lefty Gomez 34 246 12 15 3.18 138
Red Ruffing 30 222 16 11 3.12 81
Johnny Broaca 29 201 15 7 3.58 78
Johnny Allen 23 167 13 6 3.61 113

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Jumbo Brown 20 87.1 6 5 3.61 41

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AA Newark Bears International League Bob Shawkey
AA Oakland Oaks Pacific Coast League Ossie Vitt
A Binghamton Triplets New York–Pennsylvania League Billy Meyer
B Norfolk Tars Piedmont League Bill Skiff
C Akron Yankees Middle Atlantic League Johnny Neun
C Joplin Miners Western Association Runt Marr and Stanley Hino
D Bassett Furniture Makers Bi-State League Lefty Jenkins
D Washington Generals Pennsylvania State Association Benny Bengough

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Binghamton[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Babe Ruth page at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References[edit]