1937 Ford

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See also: Deluxe Ford
Ford
1937 Ford V8 Convertible.jpg
1937 Ford convertible
Overview
Manufacturer Ford
Production 1937–1940
Assembly Atlanta, Georgia
Chester, Pennsylvania
Chicago, Illinois
Long Beach, California
Dearborn, Michigan
Body and chassis
Class Full-size Ford
Body style 2-door coupe
2-door convertible
2-door 1-ton pickup truck
2-door sedan
2-door station wagon
2-door van
4-door sedan
4-door station wagon (Woodie)
2-door coupe utility (Australia) [1]
2-door roadster utility (Australia) [1]
Layout FR layout
Powertrain
Engine 136 CID (2.2 L) Flathead V8
221 CID (3.6 L) Flathead V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,845 mm (112.0 in)
Chronology
Predecessor Ford Model 48
Successor 1941 Ford

The Ford line of cars was updated in 1937 with one major change — the introduction of an entry-level 136 CID (2.2 L) V8 in addition to the popular 221 CID (3.6 L) flathead V8. The model was a refresh of its predecessor, the Model 48 (itself based on the Model 40A), and was the company's main product. It was redesigned more thoroughly in 1941. At the start of production, it cost $850. The Ford Line bore several model numbers during this period: For domestic 1937 production in the United States Ford Model Numbers for 85 hp V-8 equipped cars was Model 78 and 60 hp V-8 cars was Model 74. Models 81A and 82A in 1938, and Models 91A and 92A in 1939.

1937[edit]

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1939[edit]

The Ford's look was again modernized for 1939 — the Deluxe used a low pointed grille with heavier vertical slats, while the standard Ford had a higher grille with horizontal dividers. The headlights (the example illustrated has been converted to '40 Ford sealed beam headlamps - '39s used bulb and reflector lamps, the last year for these) were moved farther apart, now sitting almost in front of the wheels. The side grilles and louvers were removed in favor of chrome strips on Deluxe models. The "alligator" hood opened deep from the top of the grille back, eliminating the side panels found on previous models.

The phaeton, club coupe, and convertible club coupe models were discontinued. The engine was also revised for 1939 with downdraft carburetors widening the torque band but leaving power unchanged at 85 hp (63 kW). Hydraulic brakes were a major advancement across the Ford line.

Ford's upscale Mercury line also bowed in 1939, filling the gap between the Deluxe Fords and the Lincoln-Zephyr line.

1940[edit]

1940 Ford Deluxe Convertible Club Coupe
1940 Ford Standard Business Coupe

A high flat-topped hood dominated the front look of the 1940 model, as the grille spread out to reach the fenders to differentiate the Deluxe line and the headlights were pushed wider still. The standard Ford inherited the grille of the 1939 model with blackout on each side of a heavy chrome center; heavier headlight surrounds serve as another major differentiator from the 1939. 1940 was the last year of the 1937 design and its smaller V8 engine, with a straight-six engine to be reintroduced the following year. Sealed-beam headlights were one of the few major advances for 1940, while a hydraulic top was new on the convertible.

Legacy[edit]

The 1937-1940 generation of Fords is one of the most popular automobiles for hot rodding. Early stock car racing drivers also used Fords of this generation among other cars. This Ford also formed the basis for a style of dirt track racing car.

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