1937 World Snooker Championship

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World Snooker Championship
Tournament information
Dates 22 February–20 March 1937
Venue Thurston's Hall
City London
Country England
Organisation(s) BACC
Highest break England Joe Davis (103)
Final
Champion England Joe Davis
Runner-up Australia Horace Lindrum
Score 32–29
1936
1938

The 1937 World Snooker Championship was a snooker tournament held at the Thurston's Hall in London, England.[1]

Joe Davis won his eleventh World title by defeating Horace Lindrum 32–29 in the final,[2] despite trailing 13–17 and 19–21 at one point of the match.[3][4] The highest break of the tournament was 103 made by Joe Davis.[5] It was also the World Championship debut for Fred Davis, the younger brother of Joe.[6]

Schedule[edit]

Match Dates Venue, city
Horace Lindrum v Sydney Lee 22–24 February 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Willie Smith v Tom Newman 25–27 February 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Sidney Smith v Alec Brown 1–3 March 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Joe Davis v Bill Withers 4–6 March 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Horace Lindrum v Willie Smith 8–10 March 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Joe Davis v Alec Brown 11–13 March 1937 Thurston's Hall, London
Joe Davis v Horace Lindrum 15–20 March 1937 Thurston's Hall, London

Detail[edit]

The BACC introduced qualifying for the first time. If necessary, they would select players from the entrants to play in the qualifying event, the winner to advance to the competition proper.[7] With nine entries, Bill Withers and Fred Davis were chosen to play a qualifying match, the winner to join the main event.[8] The Championship proper was played at Thurston's Hall over a four-week period from 22 February and 20 March.

The first match of the competition proper was between Horace Lindrum and Sydney Lee. Lindrum took an 8–2 on the first day which was extended to 15–5 after two days, just one frame from victory. Lindrum won the first frame on the final day to win the match 16–5. The final score was 20–11.[9]

The second match of the first week was between Willie Smith and Tom Newman. This was a closer contest with the score level at 5–5 after the opening day and Newman taking a 11–9 after the second day. On the final day Newman led 14–13 but Smith won the next two frames to lead 15–14. Newman made a 57 break in the next frame to level the match but Willie Smith won the last frame 85–23 to win the match.[10]

Sidney Smith met Alec Brown in the first match of the second week. The score was level at 5–5 after the opening day but Smith won eight frames on the second day to lead 13–7. Brown won three of the afternoon frames on the final day but still needed to win all six frames in the evening to win the match. Brown won the first evening frame but Sidney Smith won the second by 87–29 to win the match 16–11. The final score was 18–13.[11]

Joe Davis met Bill Withers in the last quarter-final. Davis won the first two frames before Withers made a 47 break in the third. Withers led by 36 with just the colours left but, with 16 points in penalties, Davis managed to level the score with just the black left. Withers, however, doubled the black to win the frame. This was to be Withers last frame as Davis won the next 14 to win the match 16–1. Davis then won the remaining 14 "dead" frames to win 30–1, having won 28 frames in succession. Davis made breaks of 97 and 99 on the final afternoon. The five official afternoon frames having been completed quickly, the players played an exhibition frame during which Davis made a new record break of 135 beating the 133 scored by Sidney Smith during the 1936 Daily Mail Gold Cup earlier in the season. Davis's break was a total clearance during which he took the 15 reds, 8 blacks, 4 pinks, a blue, 2 browns and then all the colours.[12]

Lindrum and Willie Smith met in the first semi-final. Lindrum led 6–4 after the first day, extending this lead to 14–6 after two days, Although Smith won the first two frames on the final day, Lindrum won the next to lead 15–8. In the next frame, Smith led 57–9 but Lindrum made a 50 clearance to win the frame 59–57 and the match 16–8. Lindrum finished the match 20–11 ahead.[13]

In the second semi-final Joe Davis led 6–4 against Sidney Smith after the first day but Smith had the best of the second day to level the match at 10–10. Davis took a narrow lead after the final afternoon session, taking the last frame to lead 13–12. In the evening Davis won the first three frames to win the match 16–12, the final score being 18–13.[14]

The final between Joe Davis and Lindrum was a repeat of the 1936 final. The first day was level at 5–5[15] but Lindrum led 11–9[16] and extended this to 17–13 at the half-way stage.[17] The fourth day started with a break of 103 by Davis in frame 31. Davis fouled on his first visit to the table and, after a break of 29 by Lindrum, Davis cleared the table on his second visit. Davis reduced the deficit to 21–19 on the fourth day[18] and then won eight frames on the fifth day to lead 27–23.[19] After the final afternoon session Davis still led 29–26, with Lindrum needing to win five of the six evening frames. Lindrum won the first two but Davis won the next two to win the match 31–28. The last two frames were shared to give a final result of 32–29.[20]

Main draw[edit]

Sources:[21][22][23]

Quarter-finals
31 frames
Semi-finals
31 frames
Final
61 frames
England Joe Davis 30
Wales Bill Withers 1 England Joe Davis 18
England Sidney Smith 18 England Sidney Smith 13
England Alec Brown 13 England Joe Davis 32
Australia Horace Lindrum 20 Australia Horace Lindrum 29
England Sydney Lee 11 Australia Horace Lindrum 20
England Willie Smith 16 England Willie Smith 11
England Tom Newman 15

Final[edit]

Final: 61 frames.
Thurston's Hall, London, England, 15–20 March 1937.[15][16][17][18][19][20][24][25]
Joe Davis
 England
32–29 Horace Lindrum
 Australia
Day 1: 109–12 (50), 21–81, 76–45 (53), 30–95 (81), 73–21, 42–78, 70–49, 22–89 (75), 44–50, 83–37
Day 2: 58–65, 24–89, 95–25, 37–88 (70), 72–37, 36–80 (56), 98–22, 40–82 (73), 30–80 (55), 79–53
Day 3: 16–114 (80), 19–74, 93–37 (51), 14–105 (56), 78–15, 66–70, 45–54, 58–50, 13–107, 66–19
Day 4: 103–33 (103), 98–23 (66), 21–104 (93), 92–36, 110–23, 82–46, 29–95 (58), 56–92, 128–0, 34–51
Day 5: 59–46, 56–33, 68–61, 92–3, 8–80 (56), 120–1, 71–56, 81–34, 107–15 (93), 46–83
Day 6: 66–52, 44–73, 66–55, 25–78, 24–101 (58), 27–61, 63–65 (Lindrum 53), 63–42, 72–41, 38–83, 87–27 (62)
"Dead" frames were played, Davis had won the match 31–28.

Qualifying[edit]

Withers and Fred Davis played at Thurston's Hall from 7–9 January. Joe Davis was playing Newman]] in a 71-frame handicap match on the same days which meant that the Withers/Fred Davis match was played earlier in the day than usual with two sessions at 11:30am and 5:15pm. Withers took a 16–13 lead on the final evening; the match ending with him 17–14 ahead.[26]

Round 1
31 frames
     
Wales Bill Withers 17
England Fred Davis 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 9 February 2011. 
  2. ^ "Davis wins snooker title". The Canberra Times. 22 March 1937. Retrieved 2 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "Snooker Championship". The Courier-Mail. 19 March 1937. Retrieved 2 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "Snooker Championship". The Courier-Mail. 20 March 1937. Retrieved 2 November 2012. 
  5. ^ "2004 Embassy World Championship Information". globalsnookercentre.co.uk. Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 8 December 2004. Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  6. ^ Kumar, Ashok (1999). Snooker and Billiards. Discovery Publishing House. p. 12. ISBN 81-7141-475-3. 
  7. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championships". The Times. 7 October 1936. p. 4. 
  8. ^ "Snooker Pool – Professional Championships". The Times. 25 November 1936. p. 6. 
  9. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 25 February 1937. p. 6. 
  10. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship – Smith beats Newman". The Times. 1 March 1937. p. 16. 
  11. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 4 March 1937. p. 6. 
  12. ^ "Snooker Pool – Remarkable play by Davis". The Times. 8 March 1937. p. 8. 
  13. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 11 March 1937. p. 6. 
  14. ^ "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 15 March 1937. p. 5. 
  15. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 16 March 1937. p. 7. 
  16. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 17 March 1937. p. 6. 
  17. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 18 March 1937. p. 6. 
  18. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 19 March 1937. p. 6. 
  19. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – The Professional Championship". The Times. 20 March 1937. p. 5. 
  20. ^ a b "Snooker Pool – Davis retains the Championship". The Times. 22 March 1937. p. 6. 
  21. ^ "World Championship 1937". Global Snooker. Archived from the original on 28 December 2010. Retrieved 9 February 2011. 
  22. ^ "Embassy World Championship". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2012. 
  23. ^ Hayton, Eric (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. p. 143. ISBN 0-9548549-0-X. 
  24. ^ "Level pegging in snooker final". Dundee Courier. 16 March 1937. Retrieved 13 December 2015 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  25. ^ "Lindrum increases his lead". Dundee Courier. 18 March 1937. Retrieved 13 December 2015 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)). 
  26. ^ "Snooker Pool – Professional Championships". The Times. 11 January 1937. p. 7.