1939 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1939 Michigan Wolverines football
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
AP #20
1939 record 6–2 (3–2 Big Ten)
Head coach Fritz Crisler (2nd year)
Offensive scheme Single-wing formation
MVP Tom Harmon
Captain Archie Kodros
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1938 1940 »
1939 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#15 Ohio State 5 1 0     6 2 0
#9 Iowa 4 1 1     6 1 1
#20 Michigan 3 2 0     6 2 0
Purdue 2 1 2     3 3 2
Northwestern 3 2 1     3 4 1
Illinois 3 3 0     3 4 1
Minnesota 2 3 1     3 4 1
Indiana 2 3 0     2 4 2
Wisconsin 0 5 1     1 6 1
Chicago 0 3 0     2 6 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1939 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1939 college football season. Under second-year head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a 6–2 record and outscored opponents 219 to 94. The team was ranked No. 2 in the AP Poll after winning its first four games by a combined score of 165 to 27, but lost its fifth and sixth games to Illinois and Minnesota. After winning its final two games, the Wolverines finished the season ranked No. 20 in the final AP Poll. In the post-season rankings by Frank Dickinson, the University of Illinois professor who developed the Dickinson System, Michigan ranked seventh in the country.

Michigan's junior halfback Tom Harmon was selected as the team's Most Valuable Player after leading the team with 102 points on 14 touchdowns, 15 kicks for point after touchdown (PAT) and one field goal. Harmon was also named a consensus All-American and a first-team All-Big Ten Conference player and finished second behind Nile Kinnick in the voting for both the Heisman Trophy and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy.

Junior quarterback Forest Evashevski was the team second leading scorer with 25 points and was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player. Senior center, Archie Kodros, was the team captain.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
October 7, 1939 Michigan State* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 26–13   68,975
October 14, 1939 Iowa Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 27–7   28,248
October 21, 1939 at Chicago #6 Stagg FieldChicago, IL W 85–0   5,135
October 28, 1939 Yale*dagger #3 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 27–7   54,480
November 4, 1939 at Illinois #2 Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL L 7–16   30,654
November 11, 1939 Minnesota #10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI L 7–20   66,572
November 18, 1939 at Penn* Franklin FieldPhiladelphia, PA W 19–17   39,510
November 25, 1939 #6 Ohio State Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 21–14   78,815
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

During the 1938 season, Michigan compiled a 6–1–1 (3–1–1 Big Ten) record and a #16 ranking in its first season under head coach Fritz Crisler.[1] Three players from the 1938 team, Ralph Heikkinen, Jack Brennan and Norm Purucker, were on rosters of National Football League teams when the 1939 season began, though Purucker was released before appearing in any regular season games.[2]

The 1939 team returned the core of its 1938 backfield, including quarterback Forest Evashevski and halfbacks Tom Harmon and Paul Kromer, who had become known in 1938 as the "Touchdown Twins". On the line, the Wolverines returned their starting center Archie Kodros, who had been selected as the 1939 team captain at the close of the 1938 season.[3] However, the Wolverines lost all four of their starting tackles and guards, including All-American guard Ralph Heikkinen. Before the season began, the Associated Press opined that Michigan, "apparently with plenty of backfield speed and power, will be hard to stop if Coach Fritz Crisler can mold a good line."[4]

One week before the season started, Irving Kane Pond, the man who in 1879 scored the first touchdown in Michigan football history and later became a renowned architect, died in Washington, D.C.[5]

Week 1: Michigan State[edit]

Week 1: Michigan State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 0 0 7 6 13
Michigan 7 19 0 0 26

On October 7, 1939, Michigan opened its season with a 26 to 13 victory over Charlie Bachman's Michigan State team. The game, the 34th played between the two programs,[6] was played at Michigan Stadium before 68,618 spectators that The New York Times called "a howling throng."[7]

Michigan took a 26 to 0 lead at halftime. The Wolverines' first points came on three-yard run around the right end by Paul Kromer, with blocking by Tom Harmon and Forest Evashevski, capping a 65-yard touchdown drive. On the opening play of the second quarter, Harmon scored on a two-yard run, capping a drive that started at Michigan State's 33-yard line. On the ensuing Michigan State drive, Archie Kodros intercepted a pass at the Spartans' 20-yard line, and after a 15-yard penalty was assessed, Michigan took over on the five-yard line. From there, Harmon threw a touchdown pass to Evashevski. Michigan's final score followed a second interception by Kodros, with Kodros catching the ball at the 45-yard line and returning it 17 yards to the 28-yard line. On fourth down from the four-yard line, Harmon threw his second touchdown pass to Evashevski. In the third quarter, Bill Batchelor of Michigan State intercepted a pass and returned it 25 yards for a touchdown. In the fourth quarter, the Spartans scored again on a 71-yard pass play from Bill Kennedy to Wyman Davis. Harmon and William Melzow each kicked one point after touchdown (PAT) in the game.[7][8]

Michigan's starting lineup against Michigan State was Ed Frutig (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Evashevski (quarterback), Kromer (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[8]

Week 2: Iowa[edit]

Week 2: Iowa at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 7 0 0 0 7
Michigan 7 13 7 0 27

On October 7, 1939, Michigan defeated Iowa by a 27 to 7 score. The game, the 10th played between the two programs, with Michigan having compiled a 6-2-1 record in the prior nine games.[9] The game was played before a crowd of 27,512.[10]

Iowa scored first on a touchdown pass from Nile Kinnick (1939 Heisman Trophy winner) to Floyd Dean that covered 70 yards. Tom Harmon scored all 27 points for Michigan on four touchdowns and three kicks for PAT. Michigan's first touchdown was set up by a fumbled punt recovered by Roland Savilla and a 27-yard pass from Harmon to Ed Frutig with Harmon then running the final two yards for touchdown. Harmon's second touchdown was set up by a 39-yard punt return by Fred Trosko. Harmon's third touchdown was set up by a blocked Iowa punt recovered on Iowa's 37-yard line. Harmon's final touchdown came on a 90-yard interception return in the third quarter.[10][11]

Michigan's starting lineup against Iowa was Ed Frutig (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), Joe Rogers (right end), Evashevski (quarterback), Fred Trosko (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[10][11]

Week 3: at Chicago[edit]

Week 3: Michigan at Chicago
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 21 34 6 24 85
Chicago 0 0 0 0 0

On October 21, 1939, Michigan defeated Chicago by an 85 to 0 score. The game was the 26th and final match in the Chicago–Michigan football rivalry. What had once become a fierce rivalry had become a one-sided affair after the departure of Chicago coach Amos Alonzo Stagg.[12]

Tom Harmon scored two touchdowns on runs of 57 and 41 yards, threw two touchdown passes (to Forest Evashevski and Bob Westfall), and kicked three PATs and one field goal. Westfall and Dave Strong each scored two touchdowns, and the remaining touchdowns were scored by Bob Zimmerman, Hercules Renda, Ed Czak, Fred Trosko, and David M. Nelson (on a 55-yard punt return). In addition to Harmon's three PATs, additional PATs were kicked by William Melzow (4), James Grissen, Evashevski and Trosko.[13][14]

Michigan's offense finished with 461 net yards and was so dominant that it registered more touchdowns (12) than first downs (11).[14] Despite Michigan's extensive use of reserves through most of the game, Michigan's 85 points was the highest total by a Michigan team since Fielding H. Yost's Point-a-Minute teams and the worst defeat in the history of the Chicago Maroons football program.[13] The Chicago Tribune found no fault with Michigan for running up the score, noting that the first string played only 20 minutes, and adding: "You can't expect a young man with a clear field before him to pause and tie his shoelaces or pass the time of day with a Maroon."[14]

Michigan's starting lineup against Chicago was Czak (left end), George Ostroot (left tackle), Fred Olds (left guard), Don Ingalls (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), Harlin Fraumann (right end), Harry Kohl (quarterback), Renda (left halfback), Norm Call (right halfback), and Zimmerman (fullback).[13][14]

Week 4: Yale[edit]

Week 4: Yale at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Yale 0 0 0 7 7
Michigan 7 14 6 0 27

On October 21, 1939, Michigan defeated Yale by a 27 to 7 score in the fourth and final played game, dating back to 1881, between the two programs. Michigan had compiled a 1-2 record in the prior three games.[15]

Tom Harmon scored three touchdowns and kicked three PATs for Michigan. Paul Kromer scored Michigan's other touchdown. Michigan had 353 rushing yards to 35 for Yale.[16][17] After scoring 21 points against Yale, Harmon was the leading scorer in the country with 73 points.[18]

Michigan's starting lineup against Yale was Ed Frutig (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Forest Evashevski (quarterback), Kromer (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[16][17]

Week 5: at Illinois[edit]

Week 5: Michigan at Illinois
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 7 0 0 7
Illinois 0 9 0 7 16

On November 4, 1939, Michigan played Illinois at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois. The game was the 25th meeting between the two programs with Michigan having won in 1937 and 1938.[19] Michigan came into the game ranked #2 in the AP Poll, but lost to Illinois, which was 0-4 to that point in the season, by a 16 to 7 score. The Chicago Tribune wrote of Illinois that "a football season that began dismally reached a hysterical climax."[20]

Michigan outgained Illinois 112 to 98 on the ground and 99 to 77 in the air. However, Michigan gave up eight turnovers on three interceptions and five fumbles, including three fumbles by Fred Trosko. Michigan's only points came on a 49-yard touchdown pass from Dave Strong to Tom Harmon with Strong running for the PAT after Harmon's kick was blocked.[21][20]

Michigan's starting lineup against Yale was Ed Frutig (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Archie Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Forest Evashevski (quarterback), Trosko (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[21]

Week 6: Minnesota[edit]

Week 6: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 7 0 6 7 20
Michigan 0 0 0 7 7

On November 11, 1939, Michigan lost its second consecutive game, falling by a 20 to 7 score to a Minnesota squad that came into the game with three losses and no victories against a Big Ten opponent. The game was the 30th between the programs, with Minnesota having won the previous five games under head coach Bernie Bierman.[22] T

Minnesota jumped to a 20 to 0 lead with touchdowns in the first, third and fourth quarters. Minnesota's touchdown in the third quarter came on a 59-yard run by halfback George Franck. In the fourth quarter, Michigan finally scored on touchdown pass from Tom Harmon to Paul Kromer. Harmon kicked for the PAT.[23][24]

Michigan's starting lineup against Minnesota was Joe Rogers (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Archie Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Ingalls (quarterback), Paul Kromer (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[23]

Week 7: at Penn[edit]

Week 7: Michigan at Penn
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 7 6 6 19
Penn 0 3 7 7 17

On November 18, 1939, Michigan defeated Penn by an 19 to 17 score at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. The game was the 16th meeting between the two programs.[25]

Tom Harmon scored two of Michigan's touchdowns, including a 63-yard touchdown run early in the third quarter, returned a punt for 40 yards, threw a 30-yard pass to Ed Czak for Michigan's third touchdown, and was successful on one of three kicks for PAT. Harmon gained 202 yards from scrimmage and an overall total of 294 yards, including passes and punt and kickoff returns. Frank Reagan of Penn totaled 356 yards, including 188 yards passing. Michigan center Archie Kodros played all 60 minutes for Michigan.[26]

Michigan's starting lineup against Penn was Joe Rogers (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Evashevski (quarterback), Trosko (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[26]

Week 8: Ohio State[edit]

Week 8: Ohio State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Ohio State 14 0 0 0 14
Michigan 0 7 7 7 21

On November 25, 1939, Michigan defeated Francis Schmidt's Ohio State Buckeyes by a 21 to 14 score. The game was the 36th meeting in the Michigan–Ohio State football rivalry. After Schmidt's teams had won four straight games from 1934 to 1937, the Wolverines had defeated the Buckeyes in 1938 in Michigan's first year under Fritz Crisler.[27] Despite the loss, Ohio State won its first Big Ten championship since 1920.[28]

Ohio State took a 14 to 0 lead in the first 11 minutes of the game on two touchdown passes thrown by Don Scott. Michigan rallied with touchdowns in each of the second, third and fourth quarters. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by Forest Evashevski, Tom Harmon and Fred Trosko. The first Michigan touchdown was set up by a 49-yard gain on a pass from Harmon to Joe Rogers and was capped by a touchdown pass from Harmon to Evashevski. The second touchdown was set up when Ralph Fritz recovered a Don Scott fumble at the Ohio State 35-yard line. The game-winning touchdown was scored with 50 seconds left in the game and followed an Ohio State fumble recovered by Bob Westfall at the Buckeyes' 38-yard line. After being stopped at the 24-yard line, Michigan lined up for a field goal attempt with Trosko holding and Harmon set to kick. Harmon faked the kick, and Trosko, who had thrown two interceptions and fumbled earlier in the game, picked up the ball and ran for a touchdown with Harmon blocking ahead of him. Harmon also kicked all three PATs for Michigan.[29][28]

Michigan's starting lineup against Ohio State was Joe Rogers (left end), Roland Savilla (left tackle), Ralph Fritz (left guard), Kodros (center), Milo Sukup (right guard), William Smith (right tackle), John Nicholson (right end), Evashevski (quarterback), Trosko (left halfback), Harmon (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[29]

Post-season[edit]

In the post-season rankings by Frank Dickinson, the University of Illinois professor who developed the Dickinson System for determining college football's national championship, USC ranked first with 25.73 points, and Michigan ranked seventh with 22.5 points.[30] In the final AP Poll, Texas A&M was ranked No. 1, and the Wolverines were ranked No. 20.[31]

With respect to individual honors, halfback Tom Harmon was Michigan's most decorated player in 1939. Harmon was selected as Michigan's Most Valuable Player,[32] a consensus first-team All-American,[33] and a first-team halfback on the All-Big Ten Conference team.[32][34] He placed second behind Iowa's Nile Kinnick in the voting for the Heisman Trophy, with Kinnick receiving 651 points to 405 for Harmon.[35] Harmon also placed second behind Kinnick in the voting for the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference.[36]

Quarterback Forest Evashevski was also honored as a first-team All-Big Ten player. Known as one of the country's best blocking backs, Evashevski was voted by his teammates at the end of the season to serve as captain of the 1940 Michigan team.[37]

In December 1939, Michigan's longtime rival, the University of Chicago, announced that it was dropping its football program.[38] Chicago's decision opened the way for a new university to join the Big Ten Conference, with the leading candidates being Pitt, Michigan State, Notre Dame and Nebraska.[39] In the end, the conference did not immediately add another university to replace Chicago. It was not until 1953 that the conference added Michigan State as its 10th team.

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

On November 28, 1939, head coach Fritz Crisler presented varsity "M" letters to 25 players for their participation on the 1939 Michigan football team.[40]With players who started at least half of Michigan's games during the 1939 season are listed in bold, the following list identifies the players who received varsity letters.

Reserve awards[edit]

Crisler also presented "reserve awards" to the following players.[40]

  • Arthur Bennett, Schenectady, NY
  • Jack Butler, Port Huron, MI - guard
  • Norman D. Call, Norwalk, Ohio - started 1 game at right halfback
  • Edward Christy, Gary, IN - fullback
  • Thomas G. Ford, East Grand Rapids, MI - center
  • Harlin E. Fraumann, Pontiac, MI[43] - started 1 game at right end
  • James Grissen, Holland, MI - fullback
  • Theodore Kennedy, Jr., Saginaw, MI - end
  • Walter I. Kitti, Calumet, MI - halfback
  • Harry E. Kohl, Dayton, OH - started 1 game at quarterback
  • William "Bullet Bill" Luther, Toledo, OH - halfback[44]
  • David M. Nelson, Detroit, MI - halfback
  • George Ostroot[45] - started 1 game at left tackle
  • Arthur Paddy, Benton Harbor, MI - guard
  • Larry D. Wickter, Toledo, OH - fullback
  • Ernest P. Zielinski, Bay City, MI - tackle

Awards and honors[edit]

Scoring leaders[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Total
Points
Tom Harmon 14 15 1 102
Forest Evashevski 4 1 0 25
Paul Kromer 3 0 0 18
Dave Strong 2 1 0 13
Fred Trosko 2 1 0 13
Bob Westfall 2 0 0 12
Ed Czak 2 0 0 12
David M. Nelson 1 0 0 6
Hercules Renda 1 0 0 6
Bob Zimmerman 1 0 0 6
William Melzow 0 5 0 5
James Grissen 0 1 0 1
Totals 32 24 1 219

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1938 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 20, 2015. 
  2. ^ "3 'M' Gridders Now Pro". The News-Palladium (Benton Harbor, Michigan). September 26, 1939. p. 9. 
  3. ^ "Kodros, Michigan Captain". The Decatur Daily Review. November 28, 1938. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Big Ten Practice Starts Tomorrow; Another Close Football Race Expected as Teams Await Start of Training Nebraska and Indiana Michigan Backs Powerful". The New York Times. September 10, 1939. 
  5. ^ "Irving K. Pond, 82, Architect, Dead: Ex-Head of American Institute Stricken Attending Group's Washington Convention; Designer of Hull House; Chicagoan Scored Michigan's First Touchdown--Also Was Speaker and Writer". The New York Times. September 30, 1939. p. 17. 
  6. ^ "Michigan vs. Michigan St.". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "68,618 See Michigan Gain 26-13 Victory: Wolverines Score All Their Points in First Half to Beat Michigan State". The New York Times. October 8, 1939. 
  8. ^ a b Arch Ward (October 8, 1939). "Michigan Rolls Over Michigan State, 26 to 13". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  9. ^ "Michigan vs. Iowa". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c "Michigan On Top As Harmon Stars: Brilliant Back Scores All of the Wolverines' Points to Rout Iowa, 27-7; Final Dash 90 Yards". The New York Times. October 15, 1939. 
  11. ^ a b Howard Barry (October 15, 1939). "Harmon Scores All Wolverine Points As Hawkeyes Fall, 27-7". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  12. ^ "Michigan vs. Chicago". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  13. ^ a b c "Michigan Crushes Chicago Team: Harmon Runs 57 and 41 Yards to Score, Adds 3 Points and Kicks Field Goal". The New York Times. October 22, 1939. 
  14. ^ a b c d Charles Bartlett (October 22, 1939). "Maroons Hold Michigan and Harmon, 85-0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  15. ^ "Michigan vs. Yale". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "Michigan Checks Yale Easily, 27-7; Harmon Scores 3 Touchdowns, One on a 58-Yard Gallop --54,000 at Ann Arbor". The New York Times. October 22, 1939. 
  17. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (October 22, 1939). "Michigan Rolls Over Yale, 27-7; Harmon Scores 21 Points". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  18. ^ "Harmon of Michigan Heads Scoring List: Paces the Nation's Point-Makers With a Total of 73". The New York Times. October 31, 1939. 
  19. ^ "Michigan vs. Illinois". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  20. ^ a b Edward Prell (November 5, 1939). "Illinois Beats Michigan, 16-7: Harmon Scores But So Do Three Illini Players; Wolverines Suffer First Defeat". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  21. ^ a b "Michigan Is Upset by Illinois, 16 to 7; Big Ten Favorites Fall From Unbeaten Ranks--Sleeper Play Brings Touchdown". The New York Times. November 5, 1939. 
  22. ^ "Michigan vs. Minnesota". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 23, 2015. 
  23. ^ a b "Minnesota Triumphs and Drops Michigan Out of Running for Big Ten Title: 64,945 See Gophers Spring Upset, 20-7". The New York Times. November 12, 1939. 
  24. ^ Wilfrid Smith (November 12, 1939). "Gophers Rout Michigan on Power, 20-7". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  25. ^ "Michigan vs. Pennsylvania". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  26. ^ a b Roscoe McGowen (November 19, 1939). "Michigan Checks Penn's Bid, 19-17: Harmon Goes Over Twice in Brilliant Exhibition to Pace Wolverines". The New York Times. 
  27. ^ "Michigan vs. Ohio State". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  28. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (November 26, 2015). "Michigan Beats Ohio: Buckeyes Take Title Despite 21 to 14 Defeat; Trosko Hero in Last Minute Triumph". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  29. ^ a b "Michigan Topples Ohio State, 21-14; 80,227 Cheer Fine Rally Led by Harmon--Bucks Win Big Ten Title Despite Loss". The New York Times. November 26, 1939. 
  30. ^ "Trojans Are Rated First by Dickinson: Southern California Followed by Texas A&M, Cornell Under Point System". The New York Times. December 12, 1939. 
  31. ^ "Texas Aggies Win in Final Balloting". The New York Times. December 13, 1939. 
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "1939 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 20, 2015. 
  33. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 5. Retrieved August 16, 2014. 
  34. ^ "Nile Kinnick Tops Annual Big Ten All-Star Team Selection". The Palm Beach Post (AP story). November 28, 1939. p. 10. 
  35. ^ "Heisman Trophy To Kinnick of Iowa: Star Back Named in National Poll to Receive Coveted Prize at Downtown A. C.; Tops Michigan's Harmon". The New York Times. November 29, 1939. 
  36. ^ "More Honors for Kinnick: Iowa Back Named 'Most Valuable' Player in Big Ten". The New York Times. December 17, 1939. 
  37. ^ "Evashevski Named 1940 Michigan Captain". Ludington Daily News. November 28, 1939. p. 8. 
  38. ^ "Big Ten Hit By Loss of Maroon Eleven; Chicago Hopes to Remain in Conference Despite Action in Dropping Football; Team Had Poor Season; Stagg Developed Game There --Trustees' Decision Shock to Coach Shaughnessy". The New York Times. December 22, 1939. 
  39. ^ "Speculation Rises Over New Member, With Big Ten Divided on Chicago Ouster; Status of Maroon to Be Decided Soon; Delegates Expected to Settle Chicago's Relations With Western Conference; Pitt Leading Candidate; Michigan State, Notre Dame and Nebraska in Line if Old Member Is Expelled". The New York Times. December 23, 1939. 
  40. ^ a b "Crisler Awards Letters to Team". The Ludington Daily News (AP story). November 28, 1939. p. 8. 
  41. ^ Edward W. Czak, born January 23, 1919, died June 11, 2008, last residence Flat Rock, Michigan
  42. ^ Roland Savilla, born May 13, 1916, died February 7, 2005, SSN issued Michigan, last residence Saint Albans, West Virginia
  43. ^ Harlin E. Fraumann, born March 3, 1919, died December 2, 2006, last residence Clinton, Michigan
  44. ^ "Luther Withdraws from Michigan U.". The Coshocton Tribune. November 28, 1939. p. 7. 
  45. ^ George Ostroot, born April 12, 1920, died February 26, 2007, SSN issued South Dakota, last residence Saint Louis, Missouri
  46. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 5. Retrieved August 16, 2014. 

External links[edit]