1941 German football championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1941 German championship final
Replica of the Viktoria trophy
Event German football championship
Date 22 June 1941
Venue Olympiastadion, Berlin
Referee Boullion
Attendance 95,000
1940
1942

The 1941 German football championship, the 34th edition of the competition, was won by SK Rapid Wien, the club's sole German championship. Rapid, which had previously won twelve Austrian football championship between 1911 and 1938 as well as the 1938 German Cup, won the competition by defeating FC Schalke 04 4–3 in the final.[1][2][3] The final was held on 22 June 1941, the same day Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa.[4]

Overview[edit]

The score board of the 1941 final

FC Schalke 04, having won five of the previous seven finals, being the defending champions and aiming for an unprecedented third consecutive German championship, were the favourites and led the final 3–0 after 57 minutes but Rapid scored four unanswered goals, the last three of them by Franz Binder, to win the championship.[5] It marked the second of three occasions of a club from Vienna (German: Wien) in the final, Rapid becoming the only one to win the competition while Admira Wien had made a losing appearance in the 1939 final and First Vienna FC would do the same in 1942.[1] Austrian clubs had played in the German league system from 1938, after the Anschluss, until the German surrender in 1945.[6]

Rapid's victory led to a number of conspiracy theories. On Schalke's side it was speculated that Rapid was allowed to win to award a national championship to a club from the Ostmark while, in Austria, the theory developed that Rapid players were punished after the final by being sent to the front line. Both theories were disproven when Rapid, in 2009, commissioned a study into the history of the club during the Nazi era and found no evidence for either.[7] Rapid continues to list both German titles, the 1941 championship and the 1938 cup win, in its honours.[8]

Schalke's Hermann Eppenhoff became the top scorer of the 1941 championship with 15 goals, the highest individual amount for any player in the history of the competition from 1903 to 1963.[9]

The twenty 1940–41 Gauliga champions, two more than in 1940 because of the addition of the Gauliga Elsaß and Gauliga Danzig-Westpreußen,[10] competed in a group stage with the four group winners advancing to the semi-finals. The two semi-final winners then contested the 1941 championship final. The groups were divided into two with four clubs and two with six clubs with the latter, in turn, subdivided into two groups of three teams each and a final of these group winners to determine the over all group champions.[11]

In the following season, the German championship was played with twenty five clubs. From there it gradually expanded further through a combination of territorial expansion of Nazi Germany and the sub-dividing of the Gauligas in later years, reaching a strength of thirty one in its last completed season, 1943–44.[10]

Qualified teams[edit]

The teams qualified through the 1940–41 Gauliga season:[11]

Club Qualified from
VfL Neckarau Gauliga Baden
TSV 1860 München Gauliga Bayern
Tennis Borussia Berlin Gauliga Berlin-Brandenburg
Preußen Danzig Gauliga Danzig-Westpreußen
FC Mühlhausen 93 Gauliga Elsaß
Borussia Fulda Gauliga Hessen
SV Jena Gauliga Mitte
VfL 99 Köln Gauliga Mittelrhein
TuS Helene Altenessen Gauliga Niederrhein
Hannover 96 Gauliga Niedersachsen
Hamburger SV Gauliga Nordmark
SK Rapid Wien Gauliga Ostmark
VfB Königsberg Gauliga Ostpreußen
LSV Stettin Gauliga Pommern
Dresdner SC Gauliga Sachsen
Germania Königshütte Gauliga Schlesien
NSTG Prag Gauliga Sudetenland
Kickers Offenbach Gauliga Südwest
FC Schalke 04 Gauliga Westfalen
Stuttgarter Kickers Gauliga Württemberg

Group 1[edit]

Group 1 A[edit]

Group 1 A was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Danzig-Westpreußen, Pommern and Schlesien:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Vorwärts-Rasensport Gleiwitz (Q) 4 2 1 1 9 5 +4 5 Qualified to group final
2 LSV Stettin 4 1 2 1 8 9 −1 4
3 Preußen Danzig 4 0 3 1 5 8 −3 3
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Group 1 B[edit]

Group 1 B was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Brandenburg, Sachsen and Sudetenland:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Dresdner SC (Q) 4 4 0 0 11 4 +7 8 Qualified to group final
2 Tennis Borussia Berlin 4 1 1 2 5 7 −2 3
3 NSTG Prag 4 0 1 3 3 8 −5 1
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Group 1 final[edit]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Dresdner SC 6–0 Vorwärts-Rasensport Gleiwitz 3–0 3–0

Group 2[edit]

Group 2 A[edit]

Group 2 A was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Mitte, Nordmark and Ostpreußen:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Hamburger SV (Q) 4 3 1 0 9 5 +4 7 Qualified to group final
2 SV Jena 4 1 1 2 9 8 +1 3
3 VfB Königsberg 4 1 0 3 6 11 −5 2
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Group 2 B[edit]

Group 2 B was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Hessen, Niedersachsen and Westfalen:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 FC Schalke 04 (Q) 4 4 0 0 16 2 +14 8 Qualified to group final
2 Hannover 96 4 1 0 3 10 15 −5 2
3 Borussia Fulda 4 1 0 3 6 15 −9 2
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Group 2 final[edit]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
FC Schalke 04 3–1 Hamburger SV 3–0 0–1

Group 3[edit]

Group 3 was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Elsaß, Mittelrhein, Niederrhein and Südwest:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 VfL Köln 99 (Q) 6 4 1 1 19 12 +7 9 Qualified to semi-finals
2 Kickers Offenbach 6 3 2 1 19 9 +10 8
3 TuS Helene Altenessen 6 2 2 2 15 13 +2 6
4 FC Mühlhausen 93 6 1 0 5 9 28 −19 2
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Group 4[edit]

Group 4 was contested by the champions of the Gauligas Bayern, Baden, Ostmark and Württemberg:[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 SK Rapid Wien (Q) 6 4 1 1 24 5 +19 9 Qualified to semi-finals
2 TSV 1860 München 6 3 1 2 14 11 +3 7
3 Stuttgarter Kickers 6 1 2 3 11 16 −5 4
4 VfL Neckarau 6 2 0 4 10 27 −17 4
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Semi-finals[edit]

Three of the four clubs in the 1941 semi-finals had reached the same stage in the previous season, Rapid Wien, Dresdner SC and FC Schalke 04, while VfL Köln 99 replaced SV Waldhof Mannheim in comparison to 1940:[12]

Team 1  Score  Team 2
8 June 1941[13]
SK Rapid Wien 2–1 Dresdner SC
FC Schalke 04 4–1 VfL Köln 99

Third Place[edit]

Team 1  Score  Team 2
22 June 1941[14]
Dresdner SC 4–1 VfL Köln 99

Final[edit]

June 22, 1941
SK Rapid Wien 4–3 FC Schalke 04
Schors Goal 60'
Binder Goal 62' Goal 65' (pen.) Goal 71'
Report Hinz Goal 5' Goal 58'
Eppenhoff Goal 8'
Olympia Stadium (Berlin)
Attendance: 95,000
Referee: Adolf Reinhardt (Stuttgart)
SPORTKLUB RAPID:
GK Germany Rudolf Raftl
DF Germany Stefan Wagner
DF Germany Heribert Sperner
MF Germany Franz Wagner
MF Germany Leopold Gernhardt
MF Germany Stefan Skoumal
FW Germany Willy Fitz
FW Germany Georg Schors
FW Germany Franz Binder
FW Germany Hermann Dvoracek
FW Germany Hans Pesser
Manager:
Germany Leopold Nitsch
FC GELSENKIRCHEN-SCHALKE 04:
GK Germany Hans Klodt
DF Germany Hans Bornemann
DF Germany Otto Schweisfurth
MF Germany Bernhard Füller
MF Germany Otto Tibulski
MF Germany Rudolf Gellesch
FW Germany Herbert Burdenski
FW Germany Fritz Szepan
FW Germany Hermann Eppenhoff
FW Germany Ernst Kuzorra
FW Germany Heinz Hinz
Manager:
Germany Otto Faist

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (West) Germany -List of champions rsssf.com, accessed: 26 December 2015
  2. ^ FC Schalke 04 » Steckbrief (German) Weltfussball.de – FC Schalke 04 honours, accessed: 26 December 2015
  3. ^ Rapid Wien » Steckbrief (German) Weltfussball.de – Rapid Wien honours, accessed: 26 December 2015
  4. ^ Der längste Tag – das Protokoll des Überfalls Die Welt, published: 22 June 2011, accessed: 26 December 2015
  5. ^ Deutsche Meisterschaft 1940/1941 » Finale » Rapid Wien – FC Schalke 04 4:3 (German) Weltfussball.de, Game report, accessed: 26 December 2015
  6. ^ Die deutsche Vergangenheit von Rapid Wien (German) sportal.de, The German history of Rapid Wien, accessed: 26 December 2015
  7. ^ Deutscher Meister: Rapid 1, Leverkusen 0 (German) Kurier, published: 25 December 2012, accessed: 26 December 2015
  8. ^ Erfolge (German) Rapid Wien website – honours, accessed: 27 December 2015
  9. ^ "Deutsche Meisterschaft » Torschützenkönige" [German championship: Top goal scorer]. Weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  10. ^ a b kicker Allmanach 1990, page: 243-245
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h German championship 1941 rsssf.com, accessed: 26 December 2015
  12. ^ German championship 1940 rsssf.com, accessed: 27 December 2015
  13. ^ German championship 1941 – Semifinals (German) Weltfussball.de, accessed: 26 December 2015
  14. ^ German championship 1941 – Third place game (German) Weltfussball.de, accessed: 26 December 2015

Sources[edit]

  • kicker Allmanach 1990, by kicker, page 164 & 177 – German championship

External links[edit]