1943 Anteros

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1943 Anteros
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. B. Gibson
Discovery site El Leoncito Complex
Discovery date 13 March 1973
Designations
MPC designation 1943 Anteros
Named after
Anteros
(Greek mythology)[2]
1973 EC
Amor, NEO
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 43.00 yr (15706 days)
Aphelion 1.7967 AU (268.78 Gm)
Perihelion 1.0643 AU (159.22 Gm)
1.4305 AU (214.00 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.25597
1.71 yr (624.93 d)
346.55°
0° 34m 33.816s / day
Inclination 8.7053°
246.34°
338.34°
Earth MOID 0.0615688 AU (9.21056 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.19277 AU (477.632 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 4.639
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.3 km
2.39 km[3]
2.38±0.72 km[4]
2.43 km[5]
2.01 km (derived)[6]
Mean radius
1.15 km
2.867 h (0.1195 d)[1][7]
3 h[8]
2.8695 h[9]
2.9±0.1 h[10]
2.735±0.003 h[11]
6.5209±0.0022 h[12]
0.17[1][13]
0.15[3]
0.138±0.107[4]
0.15[5]
0.18 (assumed)[6]
B–V = 0.841
U–B = 0.444
S (Tholen)
L (SMASS)
L[6]
15.75

1943 Anteros, provisional designation 1973 EC, is a reddish asteroid classified as near-Earth object. It measures about 2 kilometers in diameter and is a member of the Amor asteroids, a subgroup of near-Earth asteroids which approach the orbit of Earth from beyond but do not cross it. It was discovered by astronomer James B. Gibson at the Leoncito Astronomical Complex in Argentina on 13 March 1973.[14]

The body orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.1–1.8 AU once every 1.71 years (625 days). It has a rotation period of 2.867 hours and an albedo in the range of 0.14–0.18.[3][4][5][6][13] It is a stony, relatively rare L-type asteroid in the SMASS classification scheme, described as a reddish, but otherwise featureless S-type asteroid. Anteros has an eccentric orbit of 0.26, which is tilted by 8.7 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. Its Earth minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) is 0.0622 AU (9,300,000 km; 5,780,000 mi), which is only slightly larger than 0.05 AU, the limit set for classifying asteroids as potentially hazardous objects.[1]

The asteroid was named after the Greek god Anteros, avenger of unrequited love and punisher of those who scorn love and the advances of others. The asteroid's name may have been chosen because its orbit is similar to the asteroid 433 Eros, and in Greek mythology, Anteros was said to be the twin brother of Eros.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1943 Anteros (1973 EC)" (2014-12-23 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1943) Anteros. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 156. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; et al. (March 2011). "ExploreNEOs. II. The Accuracy of the Warm Spitzer Near-Earth Object Survey". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (3): 10. Bibcode:2011AJ....141...75H. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/3/75. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Mueller, Michael; Delbo', M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (April 2011). "ExploreNEOs. III. Physical Characterization of 65 Potential Spacecraft Target Asteroids". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (4): 9. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..109M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/4/109. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Trilling, D. E.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Harris, A. W.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (September 2010). "ExploreNEOs. I. Description and First Results from the Warm Spitzer Near-Earth Object Survey". The Astronomical Journal. 140 (3): 770–784. Bibcode:2010AJ....140..770T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/140/3/770. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1943) Anteros". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  7. ^ Warner, Brian D. (July 2014). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 January-March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (3): 157–168. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..157W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  8. ^ Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.; Levy, D. H. (August 1990). "Photometric geodesy of main-belt asteroids. III - Additional lightcurves". Icarus: 402–447. Bibcode:1990Icar...86..402W. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(90)90227-Z. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  9. ^ Pravec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Sarounová, Lenka (November 1998). "Lightcurves of 26 Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 136 (1): 124–153. Bibcode:1998Icar..136..124P. doi:10.1006/icar.1998.5993. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  10. ^ Koehn, Bruce W.; Bowell, Edward G.; Skiff, Brian A.; Sanborn, Jason J.; McLelland, Kyle P.; Pravec, Petr; Warner, Brian D. (October 2014). "Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Asteroid Photometric Survey (NEAPS) - 2009 January through 2009 June". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (4): 286–300. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..286K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  11. ^ Warner, Brian D. (January 2015). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 June-October". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (1): 41–53. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42...41W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  12. ^ Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041free to read. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  13. ^ a b Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; et al. (September 2011). "ExploreNEOs. V. Average Albedo by Taxonomic Complex in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population". The Astronomical Journal. 142 (3): 12. Bibcode:2011AJ....142...85T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  14. ^ "1943 Anteros (1973 EC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 

External links[edit]