1943 Philadelphia Phillies season

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1943 Philadelphia Phillies
Also known as the Philadelphia Blue Jays
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)William B. Cox
Manager(s)Bucky Harris, Freddie Fitzsimmons
Local radioWIBG
(By Saam, Roy Neal)
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Lumber baron William B. Cox purchased the team in 1943. On March 9, Cox announced that the team would officially be called the "Phillies" again after former-President Gerald Nugent had named them "Phils" prior to the 1942 season.[1]

In 1943, the team rose out of the standings cellar for the first time in five years. The fans responded with an increase in attendance. Eventually, it was revealed by Cox that he had been betting on the Phillies, and he was banned from baseball. The new owner, Bob Carpenter, Jr., tried to polish the team's image by unofficially changing the name to the "Blue Jays"; however, the new moniker did not take, and it was quietly dropped by 1949.[2]

Offseason[edit]

Spring training[edit]

The Phillies opened spring training on March 18 in Hershey, Pennsylvania. They used the baseball diamond at Hershey High School.[3]

Notable transactions[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Season standings[edit]

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
St. Louis Cardinals 105 49 0.682 58–21 47–28
Cincinnati Reds 87 67 0.565 18 48–29 39–38
Brooklyn Dodgers 81 72 0.529 23½ 46–31 35–41
Pittsburgh Pirates 80 74 0.519 25 47–30 33–44
Chicago Cubs 74 79 0.484 30½ 36–38 38–41
Boston Braves 68 85 0.444 36½ 38–39 30–46
Philadelphia Phillies 64 90 0.416 41 33–43 31–47
New York Giants 55 98 0.359 49½ 34–43 21–55

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1943 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 12–9 8–14 11–11 11–11 11–11 12–10 3–19
Brooklyn 9–12 10–12 13–9 14–8 17–5 11–11 7–15
Chicago 14–8 12–10 9–13 12–9–1 10–12 8–14 9–13
Cincinnati 11–11 9–13 13–9 16–6–1 19–3 9–13 10–12
New York 11–11 8–14 9–12–1 6–16–1 8–14–1 9–13 4–18
Philadelphia 11–11 5–17 12–10 3–19 14–8–1 10–12–1 9–13–1
Pittsburgh 10–12 11–11 14–8 13–9 13–9 12–10–1 7–15–2
St. Louis 19–3 15–7 13–9 12–10 18–4 13–9–1 15–7–2


Game log[edit]

Legend
  Phillies win
  Phillies loss
  Phillies tie
  Postponement
Bold Phillies team member
1943 Game Log[5]
Overall Record: 64–90–3
^[a] The June 5, 1943, game was protested by the Phillies in the middle of the eighth inning.[33][34] The protest was later upheld and the game was completed with new umpires[33] on June 29.[35][36]
^[b] The first game of a scheduled double-header on June 6, 1943, ended after five innings due to rain with the score tied 1–1,[22][37] and an additional game was played on July 30.
^[c] The second game of a scheduled double-header on June 13, 1943, ended with the score 6–3.[38] After a verbal protest in the ninth inning, the Giants' Mel Ott lodged a formal protest.[39] National League President Ford Frick ruled the hit batsman (Babe Dahlgren) out, and that the game be resumed on August 6.[40][41]
^[d] The June 30, 1943, game ended after eleven innings due to the Major League Baseball curfew with the score tied 3–3,[42][43] and an additional game was played on August 11.
^[e] The second game of a scheduled double-header on July 11, 1943, ended after eight innings due to the Pennsylvania Sunday curfew law[44] with the score 8–14.[45][46]
^[f] The original schedule indicated a single games on May 10 and July 17 with New York;[47] which became a double-header on July 17.
^[g] The September 14, 1943, game ended after ten innings due to the National League curfew with the score tied 4–4,[48][49][50] and an additional game was played on September 15.
^[h] The original schedule indicated a single games on October 2 and 3 at Pittsburgh;[47] which became a double-header on October 3.

Roster[edit]

1943 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
SS Glen Stewart 110 336 71 .211 2 24

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Chuck Klein 12 20 2 .100 0 3

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Schoolboy Rowe 27 199 14 8 2.94 52
Dick Barrett 23 169.1 10 9 2.39 65

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Charlie Fuchs 17 77.2 2 7 4.29 12
Bill Lee 13 60.2 1 5 4.60 17

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Manny Salvo 1 0 0 0 27.00 0

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
A Utica Braves Eastern League Wally Schang
B Trenton Packers Interstate League George Ferrell

[51]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Phils Become Phillies Again". The St. Petersburg Evening Independent. March 9, 1943. Retrieved September 10, 2009.
  2. ^ "History: Phillies Timeline (1940s)". Phillies. Archived from the original on June 13, 2008. Retrieved June 4, 2008.
  3. ^ "Litwhiler Hits Hard". The New York Times. March 19, 1943. Retrieved September 10, 2009.
  4. ^ Schoolboy Rowe page at Baseball Reference
  5. ^ "1943 Philadelphia Phillies Schedule, Box Scores and Splits". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. April 22, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  7. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. April 23, 1943. p. 16. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  8. ^ "Major-League Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. May 1, 1943. p. 3 (Section 3). Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  9. ^ "Major-League Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. May 3, 1943. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  10. ^ "Giants Win, 7-5— Maynard's Home Runs Beat Phils". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). May 9, 1943. p. 1 (Section 4). Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  11. ^ "Phils Capture Double Bill From Giants: 24,934 Watch Rowe, Kraus Win Games, 3-2 and 3-1". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). May 10, 1943. p. 18. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  12. ^ "Major-League Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. May 13, 1943. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  13. ^ "Major Leagues". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. May 15, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  14. ^ "Cards Trounce Phils, 6-3". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. May 16, 1943. p. 1 (Section 4). Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  15. ^ "30,823 See Phillies Split Doubleheader With Cardinals: Wasdell Scores Deciding Run in Nightcap After Clouting Three-Base Drive". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). May 17, 1943. p. 16. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  16. ^ "Phils Defeat Cubs, 5-4, Before 20,820: Three Run Fifth Sews Up Night Game For Surprising Quakers". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). May 19, 1943. p. 18. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  17. ^ "Major-League Baseball". The Windsor Daily Star. Windsor, ON. May 20, 1943. p. 3 (Section 2). Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  18. ^ Balinger, Edward F. (May 22, 1943). "Bucs, Phils Recard Game For Tonight: Klinger to Face Podgajny; DiMaggio May Play Shortstop In Pirate Shakeup". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. pp. 14–15. Retrieved February 12, 2019.
  19. ^ Balinger, Edward F. (May 24, 1943). "37,176 See Buccaneers Phillies Split: New Crowd Mark Set; Sewell Wins First, 4-1; Lose, 5-2: Failure to Hit In Pinch Costs Bucs Nightcap; Lineup Changed". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. pp. 16, 18. Retrieved February 12, 2019. ... 37,176 spectators, the largest home crowd in the history of the Phillies ...
  20. ^ "Reds Crush Phillies, 11-8: Vander Meer Wild, Retires Early in Game". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). May 29, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved February 12, 2019. ... 11 a. m. game for swing-shift war-workers.
  21. ^ "Cincinnati Reds 11, Philadelphia Phillies 8". retrosheet.org. May 28, 1943. Retrieved February 12, 2019. [G]ame started at 11:00 AM to accommodate war workers from swing shift[.]
  22. ^ a b "Stan Musial Stopped Phils Cards Tie, 1-1: Weather Halts Contest; Donora Boy's Streak Ends". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). June 7, 1943. p. 17. Retrieved February 16, 2019. The Phillies were blasting young Harry Brecheen's offerings all over the lot in the first half of the sixth when time was called. They had scored two runs, had men on second and third and none out. But as the affair was called off the count reverted back to the end of the fifth inning with the score tied, 1 to 1.
  23. ^ "The Majors". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 9, 1943. p. 24. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  24. ^ a b c d e "Phils to Play Morning Game". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press. April 20, 1943. p. 16. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  25. ^ "Johnson Hurls Phillies To Win Over Braves, 2-0: Allows Three Hits In Outpointing Jim Tobin". Meriden Record. Meriden, CT. Associated Press (AP). June 17, 1943. p. 4. Retrieved January 30, 2019. [A] test blackout interrupted the game for 45 minutes[.] ... The Shibe Park management, prepared for the blackout, a scheduled test alert, kept the more than 6,000 fans happy with a program of songs broadcast over the public address system. The vast majority of the spectators abided by blackout rules but here and there in the stands a match flared as a smoke-hungry fan 'lit up.'
  26. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. July 8, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  27. ^ "Cards Win, 13-5 After 2-1 Defeat: Phillies Triumph In Protested Game Unfinished on June 5". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). July 30, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  28. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. August 4, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved March 13, 2019.
  29. ^ a b Balinger, Edward F. (August 14, 1943). "Revised Pirate Lineup to Face Phils: Gustine Gets Leadoff Post In Shakeup: Rubeling to Play Second As Coscarart Rests Sore Toe; Van Robays Cleanup". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 10. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  30. ^ "Baseball Results and Standings". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. September 6, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  31. ^ "Lunch-Time Bill Split By Giants, Phils: Kraus 1-0 Victor Then Ottmen Reach Lee for 6-3 Win". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). September 16, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  32. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. September 18, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  33. ^ a b "Philadelphia Phillies 2, St. Louis Cardinals 1". retrosheet.org. June 5, 1943. Retrieved February 16, 2019. Game was called for rain, but Phillies protested that Cardinals did not properly cover field; Protest upheld, and game completed on July 29; only lineup change was that [Whitey] Kurowski replaced [Jimmy] Brown who was now in Army[.]
  34. ^ "Pass Dodgers In Race— Cards Shade Phils, 1-0, on Musial's Hit". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. June 6, 1943. p. 1 (Section 4). Retrieved February 16, 2019. Bucky Harris, Philly manager, said after the game he was going to protest the umpire's decision to call the contest, inasmuch as the Cardinals made no attempt to cover the field. Harris cited Rule 24 to back his protest.
  35. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals Box Score, June 5, 1943". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. June 5, 1943. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  36. ^ "Cards Win, 13-5, After 2-1 Defeat: Phillies Triumph In Protested Game Unfinished on June 5". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). July 30, 1943. p. 12. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  37. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals 1, Philadelphia Phillies 1". retrosheet.org. June 6, 1943. Retrieved February 12, 2019. Game began several minutes late due to wet grounds ... [In the bottom of the fourth inning,] [t]ime called for rain for 10 minutes[.] ... Game called for rain, second game of doubleheader canceled[.]
  38. ^ "New York Giants 4, Philadelphia Phillies 3 (2)". retrosheet.org. June 13, 1943. Retrieved February 16, 2019. [Babe] Dahlgren let himself HBP. That was disallowed; then Dahlgren hit a bases-clearing double & the phils 'won'; But [Mel] Ott protested that Dahlgren should have been out; that protest was upheld, game was resumed on August 6[.]
  39. ^ "Phillies Bump Giants; A's Beat Yanks Twice: Dodgers Split Twin Bill With Braves And Tigers Take Two From White Sox". Toledo Blade. Toledo, OH. Associated Press (AP). June 14, 1943. p. 17. Retrieved February 16, 2019. Before getting his two-bagger, [Babe] Dahlgren was hit by a pitch. The Giants argued he had stepped into the ball and should be out for leaving the batter's box, but Umpire Beans Reardon ruled he should bat again. This led to the game-winning double and caused Manager Mel Ott to say later he would protest the game.
  40. ^ "Why the Short Game". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. August 7, 1943. p. 9. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  41. ^ "Kimball's Wildness Costly, But Phils Take Second Tilt". St. Petersburg Times. St. Petersburg, FL. Associated Press (AP). August 7, 1943. p. 9. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  42. ^ Balinger, Edward F. (July 1, 1943). "Pirates, Phils Battle to Tie, 3 to 3: Curfew Law Calls Night Game After Eleven Innings: Quakers Rally for Three Runs In Seventh to Tie Score Off Butcher; 10,663 See War Relief Tilt". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. p. 12. Retrieved February 12, 2019. After 11 innings tonight, an exciting baseball battle was called in accordance with a major league curfew rule which prohibits playing later than the midnight hour.
  43. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 3, Pittsburgh Pirates 3". retrosheet.org. June 30, 1943. Retrieved February 12, 2019. [G]ame called for curfew[.]
  44. ^ "Major League Summaries". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. July 12, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  45. ^ "Phillies Drop Two: Lose Doubleheader to Cincinnati, 7-4, 14-2". The Gazette. Montreal, QC. Associated Press (AP). July 12, 1943. p. 16. Retrieved February 23, 2019. ... the second game, twice halted because of weather conditions, and finally called at the end of the eighth because of the Sunday curfew, ...
  46. ^ "Cincinnati Reds 14, Philadelphia Phillies 2 (2)". retrosheeto.org. July 11, 1943. Retrieved February 23, 2019. [G]ame called due to Sunday curfew[.]
  47. ^ a b "1943 Original Regular Season Schedules". retrosheet.org. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  48. ^ "Giants Phils In 4-4 Draw: Night Game Called At End of Tenth". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, PA. Associated Press (AP). September 15, 1943. p. 14. Retrieved February 23, 2019. The New York Giants and the Phillies wound up in a 4-to-4 tie in a ball game that started last night at 9 o'clock and ended after 1 a. m. (EWT) today. ... It finally was called at the end of the tenth under league regulations that prohibit starting a new inning after 12:50 a. m.
  49. ^ "It's Senators Day To Rest in Second". The Pittsburgh Press. Pittsburgh, PA. United Press (UP). September 15, 1943. p. 27. Retrieved February 23, 2019. Interrupted by weather for a total of 95 minutes, the game was called at the end of the 10th because of the league rule prohibiting the start of an inning after 12:50 a.m.
  50. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 4, New York Giants 4". retrosheet.org. September 14, 1943. Retrieved February 23, 2019. [G]ame called for curfew at 1:05 AM; tie to be replayed as part of doubleheader next day[.]
  51. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

External links[edit]