1944 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1944 Michigan Wolverines football
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
AP #8
1944 record 8–2 (5–2 Big Ten)
Head coach Fritz Crisler (7th year)
Offensive scheme Single-wing formation
MVP Don Lund
Captain Bob Wiese (until November 1)
Captain Don Lund (after November 1)
Captain Joseph Ponsetto (after November 1)
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1943 1945 »
1944 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#2 Ohio State $ 6 0 0     9 0 0
#8 Michigan 5 2 0     8 2 0
Purdue 4 2 0     5 5 0
Minnesota 3 2 1     5 3 1
Indiana 4 3 0     7 3 0
#15 Illinois 3 3 0     5 4 1
Wisconsin 2 4 0     3 6 0
Northwestern 0 5 1     1 7 1
Iowa 0 6 0     1 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1944 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1944 college football season. Under seventh-year head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a record of 8–2 (5–2 Big Nine Conference), outscored opponents 204 to 91, finished in second place in the Big Nine Conference, and was ranked #8 in the final AP Poll.[1] The team opened the season with a victory over an Iowa-Pre-Flight team that won all of its remaining games and ended the season ranked #6 in the final AP Poll. The Wolverines then shut out four opponents: Marquette (14-0); Northwestern (27-0); Illinois (14-0); and Wisconsin (14-0). The team's two losses came against Indiana and an undefeated Ohio State team that was ranked #2 in the final AP Poll.

Michigan's left tackle Milan Lazetich was selected by both the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) as a first-team player on the All-Big Ten Conference team and was also selected by multiple selectors as a second-team player on the 1944 College Football All-America Team. Two other players on the 1944 Michigan team were selected as first-team All-Big Ten players: quarterback Joe Ponsetto (AP) and fullback Bob Wiese (UP). Wiese also served as the team's captain, and fullback Don Lund received the team's Most Valuable Player award.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 16, 1944 Iowa Pre-Flight* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 12–7   20,243
September 23, 1944 at Marquette* Marquette StadiumMilwaukee, WI W 14–0   12,366
September 30, 1944 Indiana Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI L 0–20   18,477
October 7, 1944 at Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN W 28–13   37,256
October 14, 1944 Northwestern #12 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 27–0   30,861
October 28, 1944 Purdue #10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 40–14   44,276
November 4, 1944 at Penn* #10 Franklin FieldPhiladelphia, PA W 41–19   39,557
November 11, 1944 #10 Illinoisdagger #8 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 14–0   43,922
November 18, 1944 Wisconsin #5 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 14–0   20,885
November 25, 1944 at #3 Ohio State #6 Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH L 14–18   71,958
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

At the end of August 1944, Michigan opened its pre-season practice with 50 candidates in attendance. While Michigan's Big Nine co-championship team of 1943 had returned 24 veteran lettermen, only eight of the 50 candidates in 1944 were returning lettermen.[2][3] The vast majority of the candidates (32 of 50) were part of the university's military training programs (including the V-12 Navy College Training Program).[2]

On the line, Michigan lost All-American tackle Merv Pregulman to military service as well as All-Big Nine center Fred Negus. The team returned only three veteran linemen: Art Renner, a starter at right end in 1943; tackle Clem Bauman, a non-starter in 1943; and center Harold Watts, a non-starter in 1943. Michigan's line coach Biggie Munn's other candidates for the line in 1944 included: Milan Lazetich, a tackle from Montana; Quentin Sickels, a 17-year-old freshman guard from Benton Harbor, Michigan; George Burg, a guard from Illinois; Bruce Hilkene, an end from Indiana; George Lintol, a center from Detroit; and Dick Rifenburg, a freshman end from Saginaw, Michigan.

In the backfield, Michigan lost starters Elroy Hirsch, Bill Daley, and Paul White. The team returned five lettermen to the backfield, including fullback Bob Wiese, who started all nine games in 1943 and was chosen as captain of the 1944 team, fullback Don Lund, who started one game in 1943, and quarterback Joe Ponsetto, a non-starter in 1943. Michigan backfield coach Earl Martineau's other candidates for the back positions included: Gene Derricotte, a halfback from Ohio; and Bob Nussbaumer, a halfback from Illinois.[3][4]

After a problem-filled practice drill on September 13, 1944, three days before the opening game, head coach Fritz Crisler noted that he did not harbor any illusions about his 1944 squad and added: "I'm hoping for the best, fearing the worst and expecting almost anything."[3]

Week 1: Iowa Pre-Flight[edit]

Week 1: Iowa Pre-Flight at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Iowa-Pre-Flight 0 0 7 0 7
Michigan 0 6 0 6 12

On September 16, 1944, Michigan defeated Iowa-Pre-Flight by a 12 to 7 score.[1] The Iowa Pre-Flight team won all of its remaining games and ended the season ranked #6 in the final AP Poll.

Michigan scored two touchdowns, both coming on passes from Bill Culligan to freshman end, Dick Rifenburg, one gaining 48 yards and the other gaining 58 yards. The United Press described Rifenburg as a "gangling freshman end" who "twice outreached and outran desperate Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawk defenders.[5] Joe Ponsetto missed both kicks for points after touchdown. Fullback Bob Wiese was Michigan's leading rusher in the game with 24 carries for 86 yards. The Wolverines compiled 151 rushing yards and 135 passing yards in the game, exceeding the Seahawks' totals of 99 rushing yards and 22 passing yards. In a "surprise maneuver" that foreshadowed head coach Fritz Crisler's pioneering efforts at using certain players solely on defense or offense, Don Lund was substituted for Michigan's center when the team switched to defense; the Chicago Tribune praised Lund, who intercepted to passes, for his "defensive brilliance" in the game.[6][5]

Michigan's starting lineup against Iowa Pre-Flight was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Arthur Leroux (left tackle), Quentin Sickels (left guard), Harold Watts (center), George Burg (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Gene Derricotte (left halfback), Bob Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Wiese (fullback).[6]

Week 2: at Marquette[edit]

Week 2: Marquette at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 0 7 7 14
Marquette 0 0 0 0 0

On September 23, 1944, Michigan defeated Marquette by a 14 to 0 score at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The game was the first meeting between Michigan and Marquette since 1909 and the first night game played in the history of the Michigan football program.[8] Michigan scored two touchdowns, one on a six-yard run by halfback Gene Derricotte and the other on a pass from Bill Culligan to end Dick Rifenburg covering 30 yards. Joe Ponsetto kicked both points after touchdown for Michigan. The Wolverines fumbled eight times in the game and did not score in the first half, but they out-gained the Marquette Hilltoppers 230 rushing yards to 68.[7][8]

After making three touchdown passes in the first two games of the season, freshman Dick Rifenburg withdrew from the football team, having enlisted in the merchant marine.[9]

Michigan's starting lineup against Marquette was Art Renner (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), John Lintol (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Rifenburg (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Derricotte (left halfback), Bob Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Bob Wiese (fullback).[7]

Week 3: Indiana[edit]

Week 3: Indiana at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 6 7 7 20
Michigan 0 0 0 0 0

On September 30, 1944, Michigan lost to Indiana by a 20 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. The outcome was the first loss by Michigan to a conference opponent since the 1942 season and only the third victory by Indiana over Michigan since 1900. Indiana halfbacks Robert Hoernschemeyer and Abe Addams and quarterback John Cannady led an attack that accounted for 197 rushing yards and 168 passing yards.[10][11]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Joe Ponsetto (quarterback), Gene Derricotte (left halfback), Bob Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Bob Wiese (fullback).[10]

Week 4: at Minnesota[edit]

Week 4: Michigan at Minnesota
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 7 7 14 28
Minnesota 0 0 6 7 13

On October 7, 1944, Michigan defeated Minnesota by a 28 to 13 score at Memorial Stadium in Minneapolis. The outcome was the first victory by a Michigan team playing on the road against Minnesota since 1932. Michigan fullback Bob Wiese scored three touchdowns. Bill Culligan scored Michigan's first touchdown, and Joe Ponsetto kicked all four points after touchdown. In the first quarter, Michigan stopped two Minnesota drives inside the Michigan 10-yard line. Michigan gained all of its yards from scrimmage on the ground, attempting only one pass, and finishing the game with 265 net rushing yards. Minnesota gained 119 yards rushing and 81 passing yards.[12][13]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), John Lintol (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Gene Derricotte (left halfback), Bob Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Wiese (fullback).[12]

Week 5: Northwestern[edit]

Week 5: Northwestern at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Northwestern 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 13 7 0 7 27

On October 14, 1944, Michigan defeated Northwestern by a 27 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Halfback Bob Nussbaumer scored two touchdowns (26-yard run on a lateral from Gene Derricotte in the first quarter and a 25-yard end run in the third quarter), and Michigan's other touchdowns were scored by Bob Wiese (six-yard run) and Derricotte (15-yard run in the first quarter). Joe Ponsetto kicked three of four points after touchdown. Michigan out-gained Northwestern in rushing by 450 yards to 24.[14][11]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Derricotte (left halfback), Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Wiese (fullback).[14]

Week 6: Purdue[edit]

Week 6: Purdue at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 0 7 7 0 14
Michigan 6 14 6 14 40

On October 28, 1944, Michigan defeated Purdue by a 40 to 14 score at Michigan Stadium. Fullback Bob Wiese scored three touchdowns, halfback Bob Nussbaumer scored two, and halfback Gene Derricotte scored one. Joe Ponsetto kicked four points after touchdown. Michigan out-gained Purdue on the ground by 354 rushing yards to 139.[15][16]

After the Purdue game, Michigan lost its two leading scorers, Bob Wiese and Bob Nussbaumer, both of whom were military trainees, to wartime transfer orders. Both missed the remainder of Michigan's football season.[17][18] Wiese selected Don Lund and Joe Ponsetto to take over his responsibilities as team captain, though coach Crisler stated that Wiese would continue to be recognized as captain despite his absence.[17] Lund was also tasked with filling in for Wiese at the fullback position, while Ralph Chubb was tasked with filling in for Nussbaumer.[18]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), John Lintol (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Derricotte (left halfback), Nussbaumer (right halfback), and Wiese (fullback).[15]

Week 7: at Penn[edit]

Week 7: Michigan at Penn
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 27 0 7 41
Penn 0 0 6 13 19

On November 4, 1944, Michigan defeated Penn by 41 to 19 score at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. Michigan's seven touchdowns were scored by halfback Ralph Chubb (2), Gene Derricotte, Art Renner, Bruce Hilkene, and Jack Weisenburger. Joe Ponsetto kicked five points after touchdown. The Wolverines gained 376 rushing yards and 89 passing yards, while holding Penn to 161 rushing yards and 136 passing yards.[19][20]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Gene Derricotte (left halfback), Ralph Chubb (right halfback), and Don Lund (fullback).[19]

Week 8: Illinois[edit]

Week 8: Illinois at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Illinois 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 7 0 0 7 14

On November 11, 1944, Michigan defeated Illinois by a 14 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by Don Lund (four-yard run in the first quarter) and Jack Weisenburger (two-yard run in the fourth quarter after Harold Watts recovered a fumbled punt at the Illinois 31-yard line), and Joe Ponsetto kicked both points after touchdown. Michigan held Illinois' back Claude "Buddy" Young, the NCAA sprint champion, to 81 yards. Illiois threatened in the first quarter but fumbled at Michigan's one-yard line. Michigan gained 231 yards to 159 for Illinois, with Michigan's yardage divided among multiple backs, including Gene Derricotte (67 yards), Lund (56 yards), Ralph Chubb (53 yards), and Weisenburger (37 yards). Neither team completed a pass.[22][21]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Derricotte (left halfback), Chubb (right halfback), and Lund (fullback).[22]

Week 9: Wisconsin[edit]

Week 9: Wisconsin at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Wisconsin 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 7 0 0 7 14

On November 18, 1944, Michigan defeated Wisconsin by a 14 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by Bill Culligan (84-yard run on a lateral pass from Joe Ponsetto on the first play from scrimmage) and Don Lund (56-yard run on a "spinner play" in the fourth quarter), and points after touchdown were kicked by Ponsetto and Ralph Chubb. Despite the 14 to score, the ground game was close with Michigan gaining 188 rushing yards to 184 for Wisconsin.[23][21]

Michigan's starting lineup against Wisconsin was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Milan Lazetich (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Clem Bauman (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Bill Culligan (left halfback), Chubb (right halfback), and Lund (fullback).[23]

Week 10: Ohio State[edit]

Week 10: Michigan at Ohio State
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 7 0 7 14
Ohio State 6 0 6 6 18

On November 25, 1944, Michigan faced Ohio State at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Michigan came into the game ranked #6 in the AP Poll with undefeated Ohio State ranked #3, and with the Big Nine Conference championship at stake. Ohio State won the game, and with it the conference championship, by an 18 to 14 score. Both of Michigan's touchdowns were scored by Bill Culligan, with both points after touchdown kicked by Joe Ponsetto. Ohio State quarterback and 1944 Heisman Trophy winner Les Horvath scored two touchdowns for the Buckeyes. Michigan led 14-12 in the fourth quarter, but a short 12-yard kickoff by Ralph Chubb gave the ball to the Buckeyes at their 48-yard line. Ohio State drove 52 yards with Horvath running for the winning touchdown with three minutes and 16 seconds remaining. Michigan's performance in the second half was handicapped by the loss of halfback Gene Derricotte to injury and by "a stomach disorder" that struck several Wolverines the night before the game.[25][24]

Michigan's starting lineup against Ohio State was Bruce Hilkene (left end), Clem Bauman (left tackle), George Burg (left guard), Harold Watts (center), Quentin Sickels (right guard), Milan Lazetich (right tackle), Art Renner (right end), Ponsetto (quarterback), Gene Derricotte (left halfback), Ralph Chubb (right halfback), and Don Lund (fullback).[25]

Scoring summary[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Points
Bob Wiese 7 0 0 42
Gene Derricotte 4 0 0 24
Bob Nussbaumer 4 0 0 24
Bill Culligan 4 0 0 24
Joe Ponsetto 0 23 0 23
Dick Rifenburg 3 0 0 18
Ralph Chubb 2 1 0 13
Don Lund 2 0 0 12
Jack Weisenburger 2 0 0 12
Bruce Hilkene 1 0 0 6
Art Renner 1 0 0 6
Totals 30 24 0 204

Post-season[edit]

The final AP Poll was released by the Associated Press (AP) in early December 1944. The undefeated Army Cadets team was selected as the national champion with 1,165 points and having been selected as the #1 team on 95 of the 121 ballots cast. The undefeated 1944 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, which narrowly defeated Michigan, was ranked #2 with 941 points. Iowa Pre-Flight, the team Michigan defeated in the season opener, was ranked #6 with 451 points, and Michigan was ranked #8 with 368 points.[26]

No player on the 1944 Michigan team received first-team honors on the 1944 College Football All-America Team. However, Michigan tackle Milan Lazetich received second-team honors from the AP,[27] Football Writers Association of America (FWAA),[28] International News Service (INS),[29] and Central Press Association (CP).[30] Lazetich was also selected by both the AP and United Press (UP) as a first-team tackle on the 1944 All-Big Nine Conference football team.[31][32] Lazetich was selected with the 16th overall pick in the 1945 NFL Draft and went on to pay six years in the National Football League.[33]

Two other players from the 1944 Michigan team were selected as first-team All-Big Ten players: quarterback Joe Ponsetto (AP) and fullback Bob Wiese (UP).[31][32] Wiese was also the team's leading scorer with 42 points on seven touchdowns. Don Lund, who began the season as a defensive substitute and replaced Wiese at fullback in the final four games, was selected by his teammates as the team's Most Valuable Player.[34] In the same post-season voting, members of the 1944 Michigan team selected Bruce Hilkene to serve as captain of the 1945 Michigan Wolverines football team.[34]

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

The following 30 players received varsity letters for their participation on the 1944 Michigan football team.[35] For players who were starters, the list also includes the number of games started by position. Players who started at least half of the team's games are designated in bold.[1]

Non-varsity letter winners[edit]

The following 36 players appeared on the roster of the 1944 Michigan football team but did not receive varsity letters.[35]

Awards and honors[edit]

NFL and AAFC drafts[edit]

The following 12 players from the 1944 Michigan football team were drafted to play in either the National Football League (NFL) or the All-America Football Conference (AAFC):

Coaching staff[edit]

Backfield coach: Earl Martineau[1][2]
Line coach: Biggie Munn[1][2]
Ends coach: Bennie Oosterbaan[1][2]
Reserves coach: Arthur Valpey[1][2]
Other assistant coaches: William C. Barclay (former Michigan back, 1936-1938), Ray Fisher (head baseball coach and asst. football coach), and Wally Weber (head wrestling coach and asst. football coach)[1][55]
  • Trainer: Ray Roberts[1]
  • Managers: William Hart and Rawland Sylvester[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "1944 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved June 25, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "50 Wolverines Open Fall Grid Practice Today". The News-Palladium, Benton Harbor, Michigan. August 28, 1944. p. 5. 
  3. ^ a b c Leo Fischer (September 13, 1944). "Michigan's Football Coach Does Not Harbor Any Illusions". The Tipton (Ind.) Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  4. ^ "Backs To Need Versatility: Necessary to Make Lack In Michigan Backfield Reserves". Ironwood Daily Globe. September 1, 1944. p. 8. 
  5. ^ a b c "Michigan Topples Seahawks by 12-7: Rifenburg, Cub End, Takes 2 Passes for Victors' Scores in Opener at Ann Arbor". The New York Times (UP story). September 17, 1944. 
  6. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (September 17, 1944). "Two Michigan Passes Beat Seahawks, 12-7: Bill Culligan Pitches Twice to Rifenburg; Cadets Whipped in Ground Play, Too". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  7. ^ a b c Charles Bartlett (September 24, 1944). "Michigan Wins Over Marquette in 2d Half, 14-0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  8. ^ a b "Michigan Triumphs, 14-0; Defeats Marquette on Two Long Marches in Closing Half". The New York Times (UP story). September 24, 1944. 
  9. ^ "Rifenburg Called By Draft Board". The Pantagraph (Bloomington, Illinois). January 12, 1945. p. 12. 
  10. ^ a b c Maurice Shevlin (October 1, 1944). "Wolverines Are Outclassed by Hoosiers, 20-0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  11. ^ a b "Indiana Surpriss Michigan by 20-0; Sundheim and Jagade Rip the Wolverines' Line in Upset on Ann Arbor Gridiron". The New York Times (UP story). October 1, 1944. 
  12. ^ a b c Arch Ward (October 1, 1944). "Wolverines Gain First Triumph at Minnesota in 12 Years, 28-13". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  13. ^ "Michigan Defeats Minnesota, 28 to 13; Fullback Wiese Races Across Gophers' Goal Line Thrice on Minneapolis Gridiron; 40,052 See Stirring Game; Wolverines Twice Halt Rivals on 1-Yard Stripe -- Fumbles Costly to Both Teams". The New York Times (UP story). October 1, 1944. 
  14. ^ a b Arch Ward (October 14, 1944). "Michigan Matches Feat of '24; Batters Northwestern, 27 to 0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  15. ^ a b c Charles Bartlett (October 29, 1944). "Wolverines Crush Purdue's Hopes, 40 to 14, Before 50,189". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  16. ^ "Michigan Crushes Purdue, 40 TO 14; Wiese Tallies 3 Touchdowns, Nussbaumer 2 in Their Last Game Before 50,000 Fans". The New York Times (UP story). October 29, 1944. 
  17. ^ a b "Lund Will Fill Wiese's Shoes For Wolverines: Ralph Chubb May Take Over For Departed Nussbaumer". The News-Palladium. October 31, 1944. p. 6. 
  18. ^ a b "Rusty Wolverine Air Arm Polished for Penn Contest". The Escanaba (Mich.) Daily Press. November 1, 1944. p. 8. 
  19. ^ a b Edward Burns (November 5, 1944). "Michigan Rolls Up 41-19 Margin Margin Against Penn". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  20. ^ Louis Effrat (November 5, 1944). "Michigan Swamps Penn Eleven, 41-19; Leads by 34 to 0 at Half in Display of Power -- Minisi Goes 63 Yards". The New York Times. 
  21. ^ a b c "42,200 See Michigan Down Illinois, 14-0; Wolverines Win Fifth Straight as Lund and Weisenburger Score -- Young Stopped". The New York Times (AP story). November 12, 1944. 
  22. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (November 12, 1944). "Michigan Whips Illini, 14-0: Hits Quickly Then Ties Up Speedy Rivals". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  23. ^ a b Edward Burns (November 19, 1944). "Michigan Wins Over Wisconsin Eleven, 14 to 0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  24. ^ a b Allison Danzig (November 26, 1944). "OHIO STATE DOWNS MICHIGAN, 18 TO 14, FOR BIG TEN TITLE; Lead Changes Five Times in Thrill-Packed Game Before 77,958 Spectators 52-YARD MARCH DECIDES 14 Running Plays at End Save Contest -- Bowl Acceptance Is Not Likely CLEARING THE WAY FOR A BUCKEYE BACK TO REGISTER A FIRST DOWN Ohio State Defeats Michigan, 18-14, To Capture Big Ten Championship". The New York Times (AP story). 
  25. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (November 26, 1944). "Ohio Wins Title; Defeats Michigan, 18-14; Buckeyes End 9 Game Card Without a Loss; 74,000 See Horvath, Culligan Score". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  26. ^ Harold Claassen (December 5, 1944). "Pick Army as National Collegiate Grid Champion: Buckeyes Are in 2nd Place; Randolph Field Is Third, Michigan Is In Eighth Position". Ironwood Daily Globe (AP story). p. 8. 
  27. ^ Orlo Robertson (1944-12-08). "Army, Ohio State Land 2 Players On AP All-American '44 Grid Team". Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune. 
  28. ^ "FWAA All America" (PDF). Football Writers Association of America. 
  29. ^ "INS Selects All-American". Chester Times. 1944-12-02. 
  30. ^ Central Press, "Central Press, 1944 All-American," The Deseret News, p. 14 (December 7, 1944). Retrieved October 3, 2014.
  31. ^ a b "All-Western Conference Team". The Logan Daily News. November 27, 1944. p. 5. 
  32. ^ a b "Four Ohio State Stars Named on the All-Conference Team". The Milwaukee Journal (UP story). November 22, 1944. p. 6. 
  33. ^ "Mike Lazetich NFL Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 25, 2015. 
  34. ^ a b "Bruce Hilkene Chosen To Lead Michigan Squad". The Evening News, Harrisburg, Penn. November 29, 1944. p. 18. 
  35. ^ a b "University of Michigan Football Rosters: 1944". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. 
  36. ^ Clement Bauman, born January 19, 1925, died April 1968, SSN issued Ohio
  37. ^ Ralph L. Chubb, born March 24, 1924, died February 25, 2002, SSN issued Michigan, last address Green Valley, Arizona
  38. ^ William L. Culligan, born March 11, 1924, died September 25, 2008, SSN issued Michigan, last address Jackson, Michigan
  39. ^ Arthur N. Leroux, born September 7, 1924, died February 18, 2005, SSN issued Michigan, last address Muskegon, Michigan
  40. ^ John Lintol, born December 21, 1924, died September 1973, SSN issued Michigan
  41. ^ "1947 NFL Draft". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  42. ^ a b "1949 AAFC Draft". The Pro Football Archive. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  43. ^ "Cleveland Releases Gene Derricotte". Los Angeles Times. 1949-08-07. 
  44. ^ a b c "1948 NFL Draft". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  45. ^ "Milan Lazetch". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  46. ^ "1945 NFL Draft". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  47. ^ "Don Lund". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  48. ^ "Bob Nussbaumer". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  49. ^ "1947 NFL Draft". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  50. ^ "1946 NFL Draft". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  51. ^ "Dick Rifenburg". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  52. ^ "1948 AAFC Draft". The Pro Football Archive. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  53. ^ "1947 AAFC Draft". The Pro Football Archive. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  54. ^ "Bob Wiese". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  55. ^ "Wally Weber Now Wolves' Mat Mentor". The News-Palladium (AP story). October 20, 1944. p. 6. 

External links[edit]