1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team

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1948 Wisconsin Badgers football
Conference Big Nine Conference
1948 record 2–7 (1–5 Big Nine)
Head coach Harry Stuhldreher (13th year)
MVP Red Wilson
Home stadium Camp Randall Stadium
Seasons
← 1947
1949 →
1948 Big Nine football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Michigan $ 6 0 0     9 0 0
#7 Northwestern 5 1 0     8 2 0
#16 Minnesota 5 2 0     7 2 0
Ohio State 3 3 0     6 3 0
Iowa 2 4 0     4 5 0
Purdue 2 4 0     3 6 0
Indiana 2 4 0     2 7 0
Illinois 2 5 0     3 6 0
Wisconsin 1 5 0     2 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 2–7 record (1–5 against conference opponents) and finished in last place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 13th and final year as Wisconsin's head coach.[1][2] The team averaged 258.6 yards per game of total offense, 200.6 yards per game by rushing, and 58.0 yards by passing.[3]

The team's statistical leaders included Ben Bendrick with 327 rushing yards, Bob Petruska with 125 passing yards, Jim Embach with 92 receiving yards, and Wally Dreyer with 24 points scored.[4] Center Red Wilson received the team's most valuable player award for the second consecutive year.[5] Wilson also received second-team honors from the International News Service on the 1948 All-Big Nine Conference football team.[6] Wally Dreyer was the team captain.[7]

At the annual Minnesota–Wisconsin football rivalry game held on November 20, 1948, Paul Bunyan's Axe was introduced as a trophy to be awarded to the winner. Minnesota won the 1948 game, 16-0.[8]

On December 11, 1948, four days before a student referendum on whether he should keep his job, and in the face of "Goodbye Harry" signs, Harry Stuhldreher resigned as Wisconsin's head football coach, though he retained his job as athletic director.[9]

The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1948 season, the average attendance at home games was 44,167.[10]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 25 Indiana Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI L 7–35   40,000
October 2 Illinois Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI W 20–16   45,000
October 9 at No. 9 California* Memorial StadiumBerkeley, CA L 14–40   66,000
October 16 Yale* Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI L 7–17   45,000
October 23 at Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH L 32–34   76,677
October 30 at Iowa Iowa StadiumIowa City, IA L 13–19   38,000
November 6 No. 10 Northwesterndagger Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI L 7–16   45,000
November 13 Marquette* Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI W 26–0   45,000
November 20 No. 15 Minnesota Camp Randall Stadium • Madison, WI (Paul Bunyan's Axe) L 0–16   45,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

[1][2]

Game summaries[edit]

On September 25, 1948, Indiana defeated Wisconsin, 35–7, before a crowd of 40,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin. The game was the first for Clyde B. Smith as Indiana's head coach. Indiana halfback George Taliaferro scored three touchdowns and played 51 minutes.[11]

On October 2, 1948, Wisconsin defeated Illinois, 20–16, before a crowd of 45,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison. Wisconsin halfback Clarence Self scored two touchdowns, including the game-winning touchdown with less than three minutes left to play.[12]

On October 9, 1948, Wisconsin lost to California, 40–14, before a crowd of 66,000 at California Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, California.[13]

On October 16, 1948, Wisconsin lost to Yale, 17–7, before a crowd of 45,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison.[14]

On October 23, 1948, Ohio State defeated Wisconsin, 34-32, before a crowd of 77,205 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus. Ohio State rallied from behind twice, including deficits of 19-7 and 33-20, in a game that The Cincinnati Enquirer called "one of the most scintillating, hair-raising games ever staged in Buckeye Stadium". Each team scored five touchdowns, but Wisconsin was able to convert only two kicks for extra point. Wisconsin's line prevented Ohio State from advancing the ball on the ground, and the Buckeyes opened up a passing attack, led by Pandel Savic, that accounted for 211 yards and all five Ohio State touchdowns.[15]

On October 30, 1948, Wisconsin lost to Iowa. After Wisconsin took a 13-0 lead, Iowa staged a comeback and won, 19-13, in Iowa City.[16]

On November 6, 1948, Northwestern (ranked No. 10 in the AP Poll) defeated Wisconsin, 16-7, before a homecoming crowd of 45,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin. Northwestern led 2-0 at halftime, as the only points of the half came on a safety. Northwestern then added two touchdowns in the third quarter.[17]

On November 13, 1948, Wisconsin shut out Marquette, 26-0, before a crowd of 43,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisconsin. Wally Dreyer was the star for Wisconsin.[18]

On November 20, 1948, in the annual Minnesota–Wisconsin football rivalry game, Minnesota (ranked No. 15 in the AP Poll) defeated Wisconsin, 16–0, before a crowd of 45,000 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison. Minnesota exceeded Wisconsin in total yards by a tally of 425 to 88.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1948 Wisconsin Badgers Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. March 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book" (PDF). University of Wisconsin. 2016. pp. 212, 220. 
  3. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, p. 146.
  4. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, pp. 134-136.
  5. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, p. 181.
  6. ^ "INS Big Nine Honorees". Milwaukee Sentinel (INS story). November 21, 1948. p. B2. 
  7. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, p. 185.
  8. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, p. 267.
  9. ^ "Decision Is His Own, Says Stuhldreher: Wisconsin Grid Boss Quits Job". The Akron Beacon Journal. December 12, 1948. p. C1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ Wisconsin Football 2016 Fact Book, p. 258.
  11. ^ Bob Stranahan (September 26, 1948). "Heads-Up Play Gives Indiana 35–7 Upset Over Wisconsin". The Indianapolis Star. p. 3-1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ "Badgers Tally in Last 3 Minutes to Shade Illini: Self Climaxes Thriller With 2 Yard Plunge". The Pantagraph. October 3, 1948. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ Russ Newland (October 10, 1948). "Bears Bowl Over Badgers, 40 to 14". Los Angeles Times. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ Irving Vaughan (October 17, 1948). "Yale Beats Badgers, 17–7: 3d Quarter Rally Ends Badger Hope". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "Bucks Score Five Times Through Air To Win, 34-32: Badgers Bow in Real Thriller". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 24, 1948. p. 42 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ Bert McGrane (October 31, 1948). "Iowa Trails, 13-0 -- Wins, 19-13: Fryhauf Opens Late Attack On Wisconsin". The Des Moines Register. p. 1-S – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ "Northwestern Whips Wisconsin, 16 to 7: Fumbles By Wildcats and Badgers; N.U. Leads Only 2-0 at Half Time". Chicago Tribune. November 7, 1948. p. 2-1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ Irving Vaughan (November 14, 1948). "Badgers Defeat Marquette in State Feud, 26-0". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ Irving Vaughan (November 21, 1948). "Minnesota Wins, 16-0: Badgers No Match for Foes' Power". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read