1949 Army Cadets football team

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1949 Army Cadets football
Conference Independent
Ranking
AP No. 4
1949 record 9–0
Head coach Earl Blaik (9th season)
Offensive scheme T formation
Home stadium Michie Stadium
Seasons
← 1948
1950 →

The 1949 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1949 college football season. The Cadets scored 354 points, while the defense allowed only 68 points. Arnold Galiffa was the starting quarterback, ahead of Earl Blaik's son, Bob.[1] Johnny Trent was the team captain. The Cadets won the Lambert-Meadowlands Trophy as the best college team in the East.[2] At season’s end, Red Blaik confessed that he thoughts of retiring.

Offseason[edit]

Sid Gillman left Army to become the head coach for the University of Cincinnati. Head coach Red Blaik interviewed Vince Lombardi, but harboured doubts that Lombardi’s background as a high school coach would prepare him for the job.[3]

Coaching staff[edit]

Besides Lombardi, Murray Warmath of Tennessee was the other new face on the coaching staff. Lombardi would focus on offense, while Warmath worked on the defense. They were the only civilian coaches on the staff.[4] In November 1934, Lombardi (with Dartmouth) faced off against Warmath (playing for Tennessee) with Dartmouth winning the game 13-12.[5] The other members of the staff included Doug Kenna, Paul Amen, and John Sauer.

Regular season[edit]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 24 Davidson Michie StadiumWest Point, NY W 47–7  
October 1 Penn State Michie Stadium • West Point, NY W 47–7  
October 8 at No. 1 Michigan No. 7 Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 21–7  
October 15 at Harvard No. 2 Harvard StadiumBoston, MA W 54–14  
October 22 Columbia No. 2 Michie Stadium • West Point, NY W 63–6  
October 29 VMI No. 2 Michie Stadium • West Point, NY W 40–14  
November 5 Fordham No. 2 Michie Stadium • West Point, NY W 35–0  
November 12 at Penn No. 2 Franklin FieldPhiladelphia, PA W 14–13  
November 26 vs. Navy No. 4 Municipal Stadium • Philadelphia, PA (Army–Navy Game) W 38–0  
#Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

Accusations of dirty play[edit]

There were accusations that Army played dirty. Against the University of Michigan, Wolverine’s halfback Chuck Ortmann was knocked unconscious. The accusation was that Army player Gil Stephenson kicked him.[6] The matter was escalated when Michigan professor of Geology, WH Hobbs was interviewed by the Michigan Daily and commented on the play. The press continued to establish Army’s notoriety as bullies after convincing wins over Harvard 54-14, and Columbia 63-6. Army hosted Vince Lombardi’s former team, the Fordham Rams at Michie Stadium.[7] One of the members of the Rams was Vince’s brother, Joe Lombardi, who transferred to the school after Lombardi left. Tim Cohane, writer of Look Magazine was a Fordham alumnus, and a friend of Army coach Red Blaik. He pressured both teams to play each other. Cohane felt the game would help Fordham rise to national prominence.[8] Herb Seidell, the Fordham captain, lost a tooth in the game. Several fights ensued and the media named the match, the Donnybrook on the Hudson. There were multiple penalties for unnecessary roughness.

References[edit]

  1. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.105, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  2. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.109, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  3. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, pp.97-98, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  4. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.99, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  5. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.100, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  6. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.107, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  7. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.108, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3
  8. ^ When Pride Still Mattered, David Maraniss, p.108, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY, 1999, ISBN 978-0-684-84418-3