1963–64 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The 1963-64 Kangaroo tour was the eleventh Kangaroo tour, during which the Australian national rugby league team traveled to Europe and played thirty-six matches against British and French club and representative teams. It included three Test matches against Great Britain for The Ashes, and three Tests against the French. The tour followed the 1959-60 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France and was followed by the 1967-68 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain and France.

The squad's leadership[edit]

The Australian team was captain-coached by Western Suburbs Magpies Halfback Arthur Summons, though due to injury to Summons the test captaincy fell to St George Hooker Ian Walsh for Ashes series against Great Britain and the first test against France.

Touring squad[edit]

Player Club Position(s) Tests Games Tries Goals F/Goals Points
John Cleary Manly Sea Eagles colours.svg Townsville (Qld) Prop 0
Michael Cleary South Sydney colours.svg South Sydney Rabbitohs Wing 1
Ken Day Wests Panthers Colours.svg Brisbane Wests (Qld) Second-row 2
Peter Dimond Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs Magpies Wing 6
Peter Gallagher Brothers Colours.svg Past Brothers (Qld) Prop 3
Reg Gasnier St. George colours.svg St George Dragons Centre 6
John Gleeson Brothers Colours.svg Past Brothers (Qld) Five-eighth, Halfback 0
Brian Hambly Parramatta colours.svg Parramatta Eels Prop, Second-row 5
Earl Harrison Penrith Panthers square flag icon with 2017 colours.svg Gilgandra (NSW Country) Five-eighth 4
Ken Irvine North Sydney colours.svg North Sydney Bears Wing 5
Les Johns Canterbury colours.svg Canterbury-Bankstown Berries Fullback 0
Noel Kelly Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs Magpies Hooker, Prop 6
Graeme Langlands St. George colours.svg St George Dragons Fullback, Centre 5
Jim Lisle South Sydney colours.svg South Sydney Rabbitohs Five-eighth 0
Barry Muir Wests Panthers Colours.svg Brisbane Wests (Qld) Halfback 6
Paul Quinn France colours.svg Gerringong (NSW Country) Prop 3
Johnny Raper St. George colours.svg St George Dragons Lock 5
Barry Rushworth Melbourne colours.svg Lithgow (NSW Country) Centre 1
Kevin Ryan St. George colours.svg St George Dragons Second-row 0
Kevin Smyth Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs Magpies Second-row, Lock 2
Frank Stanton Manly Sea Eagles colours.svg Manly Warringah Sea Eagles Centre, Halfback 0
Arthur Summons (ca/co) Western Suburbs colours.svg Western Suburbs Magpies Halfback 2
Dick Thornett Parramatta colours.svg Parramatta Eels Prop 4
Ken Thornett Parramatta colours.svg Parramatta Eels Fullback 6
Ian Walsh (vc) St. George colours.svg St George Dragons Hooker 4
Billy Wilson North Sydney colours.svg North Sydney Bears Prop 1
Graham Wilson Newtown colours.svg Newtown Bluebags Prop, Second-row 1

Great Britain[edit]

The Ashes series against Great Britain saw an aggregate crowd of 65,286 attending the Test series. The largest attendance of the tour came during the Kangaroos 50-12 second test win over Great Britain at Station Road in Swinton with 30,843 in attendance. The largest non-test attendance of the tour was 21,284 when the Kangaroos defeated St. Helens at Knowsley Road.

Test venues[edit]

The three Ashes series tests took place at the following venues.

London Swinton Leeds
Wembley Stadium Station Road Headingley
Capacity: 100,000 Capacity: 40,000 Capacity: 30,000
Inside the old Wembley Stadium.jpg GB v AUS 09-11-1963 at Station Road 1.jpg South Stand, Headingley Stadium during the second day of the England-Sri Lanka test (21st April 2014) 001.JPG










The Ashes series[edit]

First Test[edit]

The first Ashes series test was played at the famous Wembley Stadium in London. Reg Gasnier ran in 3 of the Kangaroos 6 tries while his St George team mate and centre partner Graeme Langlands kicked 5 goals and crossed for his own try. In front of a small crowd of only 13,946 (in a stadium which at the time could hold up to 100,000 and earlier in the year had seen a crowd of 84,488 for the Challenge Cup Final), the Kangaroos kept the Lions scoreless with Neil Fox's lone goal the only score for the home side as Australia won 28-2.

Wednesday, 16 October
Great Britain  2 – 28  Australia
Tries:




Goals:
Neil Fox (1)
[11] Tries:
Reg Gasnier (3)
Ken Irvine
Graeme Langlands
Ken Thornett
Goals:
Graeme Langlands (5)
Wembley Stadium, London
Attendance: 13,946
Referee: Denis Davies England
Man of the Match: Reg Gasnier Australian colours.svg
Great Britain Position Australia
Ken Gowers FB Ken Thornett
Bill Burgess WG Ken Irvine
Eric Ashton (c) CE Reg Gasnier
Neil Fox CE Graeme Langlands
Norman Field WG Peter Dimond
Dave Bolton SO Earl Harrison
Alex Murphy SH Barry Muir
John Tembey PR Peter Gallagher
Bill Sayer HK Ian Walsh (c)
Brian Tyson PR Noel Kelly
Jim Measures SR Brian Hambly
Ken Bowman SR Dick Thornett
Vince Karalius LF Johnny Raper
Coach Arthur Summons






Second Test[edit]

The second test at Station Road in Swinton has gone down in rugby league folklore as the "Swinton Massacre". The Kangaroos ran riot, crossing for 12 tries to just 2 from the Lions. The 50-12 win was not only the Kangaroos highest ever score against Great Britain, it also saw Australia win The Ashes in England for the first time since 1911–12 and the first time an all-Australian team (the 1911–12 squad included New Zealand players) had won The Ashes in England. British fans got a taste of Ken Irvine's legendary speed when he crossed for three long range tries while Reg Gasnier, Peter Dimond and Graeme Langlands all crossed for doubles with Langlands also kicking 7 goals for a personal tally of 20 points. Though on this day there was none better than Kangaroos lock forward Johnny Raper who while not scoring himself, had a hand in 9 of his teams 12 tries.[1]

Saturday, 9 November
Great Britain  12 – 50  Australia
Tries:
John Stopford
Jim Measures




Goals:
Neil Fox (3)
[17] Tries:
Ken Irvine (3)
Reg Gasnier (2)
Peter Dimond (2)
Graeme Langlands (2)
Earl Harrison
Noel Kelly
Dick Thornett
Goals:
Graeme Langlands (7)
Station Road, Swinton
Attendance: 30,843
Referee: Denis Davies England
Man of the Match: Johnny Raper Australian colours.svg
Great Britain Position Australia
Ken Gowers FB Ken Thornett
Mick Sullivan WG Ken Irvine
Eric Ashton (c) CE Reg Gasnier
Neil Fox CE Graeme Langlands
John Stopford WG Peter Dimond
Frank Myler SO Earl Harrison
Alex Murphy SH Barry Muir
Bill Robinson PR Paul Quinn
Len McIntyre HK Ian Walsh (c)
Cliff Watson PR Noel Kelly
Jim Measures SR Ken Day
Ron Morgan SR Dick Thornett
Vince Karalius LF Johnny Raper
Coach Arthur Summons





Third Test[edit]

With pride on the line as no England or Great Britain team had ever lost a home series 3-0 to Australia, The Lions put in a much improved performance at Headingley in Leeds. The Rugby Football League had appointed "Sergeant Major" Eric Clay as the referee for the game. The two sides set about settling scores and the Australians felt Clay was biased. It is considered was one of the most brutal Tests ever played, with two Australians (Barry Muir and Brian Hambly) and one British player (Cliff Watson) being sent off. Muir who was sent off (for kicking) later told that he first told Clay "where to go" as he left the field, and later approached Clay after the game and said to him "You robbed us". According to Muir, Clay reportedly responded with "Barry, I've got to live here".[2]

Ken Irvine, who scored Australia's only try for the match, repeated his efforts from the 1962 Ashes series by scoring a try in each test of an Ashes series.

Saturday, 30 November
Great Britain  16 – 5  Australia
Tries:
Johnny Ward
John Stopford
Geoff Smith
Don Fox
Goals:
Don Fox (2)
[22] Tries:
Ken Irvine



Goals:
Graeme Langlands (1)
Headingley, Leeds
Attendance: 20,497
Referee: Eric Clay England
Great Britain Position Australia
Ken Gowers FB Ken Thornett
Geoff Smith WG Ken Irvine
Keith Holden CE Reg Gasnier
Alan Buckley CE Graeme Langlands
John Stopford WG Peter Dimond
Dave Bolton SO Earl Harrison
Tommy Smales (c) SH Barry Muir
Frank Collier PR Noel Kelly
Johnny Ward HK Ian Walsh (c)
Cliff Watson PR Paul Quinn
Dick Huddart SR Brian Hambly
Ken Roberts SR Dick Thornett
Don Fox LF Johnny Raper
Coach Arthur Summons

France[edit]

Date Opponent Score Ground Referee Crowd Report
5 December 1963 Celtic de Paris 2 – 30 Stade Pershing, Paris 200
8 December 1963 France 8 – 5 Stade Chaban-Delmas, Bordeaux A. Cassan (FRA) 4,261 [3]
12 December 1963 Basque / Bearnaise XIII 5 – 18 4,261
15 December 1963 South West France 11 – 41 Stade Jules Ribet, Saint-Gaudens 1,266
19 December 1963 Pyrenees 10 – 14 Stade Jules Ribet, Saint-Gaudens 2,059
22 December 1963 France 10 – 14 Stade des Minimes, Toulouse E. Martung (FRA) 6,932 [4]
25 December 1963 Rouergue XIII 2 – 13 Stade Municipal d'Albi, Albi 3,780
29 December 1963 Languedoc XIII 12 – 16 Stade Albert Domec, Carcassonne 6,143
4 January 1963 XIII Catalan 15 – 11 Stade Jean-Laffon, Perpignan 4,524
4 January 1964 South France 11 – 51 889
5 January 1964 Provence XIII 4 – 35 Parc des Sports, Avignon 2,009
12 January 1964 Roanne XIII 2 – 38 2,969
16 January 1964 Les Espoirs (Colts) 12 – 19 2,617
18 January 1964 France 8 – 16 Parc des Princes, Paris G. Jameau (FRA) 5,979 [5]

French Tests[edit]

First test[edit]

Although Ken Irvine was unavailable due to injury, The Kangaroos lost nothing with pace on the wing due to the selection of South Sydney flyer and dual-rugby international Michael Cleary who 12 months earlier had won the Bronze Medal in the 100 yards sprint at the 1962 Commonwealth Games. However it wasn't enough as the tourists were defeated 8-5 by a determined French.

8 December 1963
France  8 – 5  Australia
Tries:
Georges Ailleres
Bernard Fabre
Goals
Jean Villeneuve (1)
Tries:
Graeme Langlands

Goals
Graeme Langlands (1)
Stade Chaban-Delmas, Bordeaux
Attendance: 4,261
Referee: A. Cassan France
France Position Australia
Andre Carrere FB Ken Thornett
Jean Etcheberry WG Michael Cleary
Bernard Fabre CE Graeme Langlands
Claude Mantoulan CE Reg Gasnier
F. Roldos WG Peter Dimond
Jean Villeneuve SO Earl Harrison
Georges Fages (c) SH Barry Muir
L. Faletti PR Noel Kelly
Jean Graciet HK Ian Walsh (c)
Jean Pano PR Paul Quinn
Henry Marracq SR Brian Hambly
Georges Ailleres SR Dick Thornett
Andre Lacaze LF Johnny Raper
Jean-Pierre Capdouze Int. Ron Lynch
Coach Arthur Summons

Second Test[edit]

22 December 1963
France  9 – 21  Australia
Tries:
Jean Etcheberry



Goals
Jean Villeneuve (2)
Andre Lacaze (1)
Tries:
Ken Irvine (2)
Graeme Langlands
Arthur Summons
Ken Thornett
Goals
Graeme Langlands (3)
Stade des Minimes, Toulouse
Attendance: 6,932
Referee: Eddie Martung France
France Position Australia
Andre Carrere FB Ken Thornett
Jean Etcheberry WG Ken Irvine
Bernard Fabre CE Graeme Langlands
Claude Mantoulan CE Reg Gasnier
F. Roldos WG Peter Dimond
Jean Villeneuve SO Arthur Summons (c)
Georges Fages (c) SH Barry Muir
L. Faletti PR Billy Wilson
Jean Graciet HK Noel Kelly
Jean Pano PR Peter Gallagher
Henry Marracq SR Kevin Smyth
Georges Ailleres SR Dick Thornett
Andre Lacaze LF Johnny Raper
Coach Arthur Summons

Third Test[edit]

18 January 1964
France  8 – 16  Australia
Tries:
F. Roldos
Louis Verge

Goals
Jean Villeneuve (1)
Tries:
Barry Muir (2)
Ken Irvine
Barry Rushworth
Goals
Brian Hambly (1)
Parc des Princes, Paris
Attendance: 5,979
Referee: Georges Jameau France
France Position Australia
Andre Carrere FB Ken Thornett
F. Roldos WG Ken Irvine
Bernard Fabre CE Reg Gasnier
Gilbert Benausse CE Barry Rushworth
Daniel Pellerin WG Peter Dimond
Jean Villeneuve SO Arthur Summons (c)
Louis Verge SH Barry Muir
L. Faletti PR Brian Hambly
Jean Graciet HK Noel Kelly
Jean Pano PR Peter Gallagher
H. Larrue SR Graham Wilson
Henry Marracq SR Ken Day
Jean Barthe LF Kevin Smyth
Coach Arthur Summons

References[edit]

External links[edit]