1963 24 Hours of Le Mans

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1963 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners

The 1963 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 31st Grand Prix of Endurance in the 24 Hours of Le Mans series and took place on 15 and 16 June 1963. It was also the tenth round of the 1963 World Sportscar Championship season.

Despite good weather throughout the race, attrition was high leaving only twelve classified finishers. There were a number of major accidents, the most serious of which caused the death of Brazilian driver Christian Heins and bad injuries to Roy Salvadori and Jean-Pierre Manzon. This was the first win for a mid- or rear-engined car, and the first all-Italian victory – with F1 drivers Ludovico Scarfiotti and Lorenzo Bandini winning in their Ferrari 250 P. In fact Ferrari dominated the results list filling the first six places, and the winners’ margin of over 200 km (16 laps) was the biggest since 1927.

Le Mans in 1963

Regulations[edit]

This year the CSI (Commission Sportive Internationale - the FIA’s regulatory body) lifted the 4.0 litre engine restriction on its GT classes, as well as introducing a sliding scale for minimum weight versus engine size. It also revised the equivalence ratio for forced induction/turbo engines from 1.2 up to 1.4. The minimum height for cars was increased to 850mm (33.5 inches).[1]

The Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) renamed its ‘Experimental’ category as ‘Prototype’ and lifted the 4.0 litre engine restriction for those classes as well. The main change for the race was the starting positions on the grid were determined by the fastest times in practice rather than in order of engine size.[1][2] In a nod to driver safety, the wearing of safety-belts was now recommended.[3]

Entries[edit]

The ACO received 80 entries but after a number of withdrawals there were 55 cars to practice. The proposed entry list comprised:

Category Classes Prototype
Entries
GT
Entries
Total
Entries
Large-engines 3.0+, 3.0, 2.5L 14 13 27
Medium-engines 2.0, 1.6, 1.3L 2 10 12
Small-engines 1.15, 1.0, 0.85L 15 (+2 reserves) 0 15
Total Cars 31 (+2 reserves) 23 54 (+1 experimental)

Once again Ferraris easily dominated the entry list with eleven cars. SEFAC Ferrari brought three new prototypes. The 250P was an innovative mid-engined design of Mauro Forghieri that was a longer version of the Dino. The hefty 3-litre V12 generated 310 bhp.[4] The team’s regular Formula 1 drivers were assigned: John Surtees with Willy Mairesse, and Ludovico Scarfiotti with Lorenzo Bandini. The third car was driven by sports-car regulars Mike Parkes and Umberto Maglioli

There were also three new 330 LMB 4-litre front-engined prototypes run by privateer teams. While Ferrari stalwart Pierre Noblet ran a works-supported entry, the North American Racing Team (NART) ran another (for Dan Gurney and Jim Hall) as well as the 330 TRI/LM, for Pedro Rodriguez and Roger Penske, that had won the race the previous year.[5] There was also a new British team – Ronnie Hoare’s Maranello Concessionaires entered a 330LMB for Jack Sears and Mike Salmon.[6]

Four manufacturers lined up against the big Ferrari prototypes: Aston Martin, Maserati, Lister and Lola. John Wyer had convinced the ACO to accept the Aston Martin DP214 prototypes as GT-derivatives of the DB4 cars. The successor DP215 had a new 4.0-litre engine capable of 323 bhp. It was driven by Phil Hill and Lucien Bianchi.[7]

Maserati returned with an updated Tipo 151 coupé for their French agency. Lightened and now fitted with a fuel-injected 5-litre V8 engine, it was the biggest car in the field and produced an impressive 430 bhp capable of 290 kp/h (180 mph). It would be raced by French veteran André Simon and Lloyd ‘Lucky’ Casner (owner of the American Camoradi team racing Maserati cars).[8]

For their second foray into Le Mans, Lola rushed their revolutionary Mk6 GT prototype. The Eric Broadley / Tony Southgate design had a steel monocoque chassis with fibreglass body and intricate suspension design. Initially fitted with a mid-mounted Ford 4.2-litre Indycar engine generated 350 bhp, it was subsequently uprated to the 4.7 litre Ford engine. The car was so light that it needed ballast to reach its 875 kg minimum weight. However it was undergeared and could only reach a maximum 240 kp/h (150 mph).[9] The car would be raced by David Hobbs and debutante Richard Attwood

Porsche, now entered as Porsche System Engineering, a Swiss-registered entity for the works team, had the 2-litre class to itself. They arrived with a pair of developed 718-series cars that had won the Targa Florio when the Ferrari s had failed. One a coupé (for ‘Jo’ Bonnier/Tony Maggs), the other a spyder (for Edgar Barth/Herbert Linge), they used the new 2-litre Flat-8 Formula 1 engine.[10]

Once again the smaller-engined classes were strongly contested. Charles Deutsch (last year’s victor), after the withdrawal of Panhard’s engines, signed a deal with German manufacturer Auto Union-DKW. The 750cc three-cylinder, two-stroke engine could develop 80 bhp and with the streamlined body, could reach 225 kp/h (140 mph).[11] His erstwhile partner, Bonnet had four works entries. Their new streamlined version now named the “Aerodjet”.[3] Their French opposition however was from a new team: Jean Rédélé’s new Alpine marque (also running with 1-litre Renault engines). The new A110 came to Le Mans in its streamlined M63 longtail version.

Austin-Healey had a new body designed by Frank Costin for their Sebring Sprite. The 1100cc BMC engine developed 95 bhp.[12] Another British boutique sports-car manufacturer, Deep Sanderson, arrived with its new 301 prototype.

Since 1953 the ACO had offered a prize for a turbine-drive car to complete the 24-hour event. Yet it was only this year that a formal entry was received. Rover had worked on turbines for twenty years and the previous year their fourth prototype had done demonstration laps at Le Mans. Based on a BRM Formula 1 car, the twin turbines generated 150 bhp but only gave a maximum speed of 230 kp/h (145 mph). Unable to run on regulation fuel, (it ran on paraffin) the car was not on the official entry list, and given number “00”. And without a heat exchanger, the turbine’s fuel consumption was so great (7mpg) that it could not run with a regulation fuel-tank.[13] BRM, in turn, released their grand prix drivers, Richie Ginther and current World Champion Graham Hill.[14][3]

In the GT division there were four Ferrari 250 GTOs. The works car was driven by sports-car regulars Carlo Maria Abate and Fernand Tavano. The two Belgian teams, Ecurie Francorchamps and Equipe Nationale Belge, returned and NART ran a long-wheelbase version.

Aston Martin had got two of their DP214 cars homologated, running with the same 3.7-litre engine as the DB4. The works team had Grand Prix drivers Bruce McLaren and Innes Ireland in one and Bill Kimberly / Jo Schlesser in the second. Jean Kerguen also returned with his French Aston Martin for the third year.

Briggs Cunningham was back this year with three of the Jaguar E-type ‘Lightweight’ specials overseen by Lofty England. The fuel-injected 3.8-litre Straight-6 engine now developed 310 bhp. Cunningham drove with Bob Grossman with his other regular drivers Walt Hansgen and Roy Salvadori were paired with Augie Pabst and Paul Richards respectively.[15]

After his success in winning the 1959 race, Carroll Shelby had been working with Derek Hurlock, owner of AC Cars, to fit the new 260cu in (4.2-litre) small-block Ford V8 to the AC Ace chassis that was already race-proven at Le Mans. Put into production, it was the Mk 2 version with the bigger 289cu in (4.7-litre) Ford Windsor engine that was entered for the race. One from AC Cars for Ninian Sanderson and Peter Bolton, was managed by Stirling Moss and the other from Ed Hugus, who had run the car’s race development in America.[16]

In the smaller categories the Porsche works team had a pair 356B GS for their regular Dutch drivers Carel Godin de Beaufort and Ben Pon. The cars were now fitted with a new 2.0-litre flat-4 engine.[10] They would be up against a privateer MG MGB, the manufacturer’s latest model, driven by top British rally driver Paddy Hopkirk.[17] In the 1600cc class a pair of works Sunbeam Alpines were matched against three Alfa Romeos run by the teams Scuderia Sant Ambroeus and Scuderia Filipinetti. The two Team Elite Lotuses had the 1300cc to themselves when the Equipe Nationale Belge Elite entry was withdrawn.

Practice[edit]

Twenty-three cars availed themselves of the testing weekend over 6–7 April. It was the first appearance of the Ferrari 330 LMB and in it works driver Mike Parkes became the first driver to officially break 300 kp/h (186 mph).on the long Mulsanne Straight. But it was John Surtees who put in the best time over the weekend, with a blistering 3min 45.8.[6][2] Later, in official qualifying, Phil Hill was also calculated to have hit that magical 300kp/h barrier on the Mulsanne in his Aston Martin prototype.[7]

Rushing to have their Lola GTs ready in time, Eric Broadley drove the first car himself across from their Bromley factory. Although arriving after inspections had officially closed, the ACO, perhaps surprisingly, still allowed the car to enter. The second car, still unassembled, had to be scratched).[9][2]

Further late withdrawals and no-shows left only 49 cars to practice. The honour of the first Pole Position by qualification went to Pedro Rodriguez in the NART Ferrari with a lap-time of 3min 50.9 on Wednesday night.[2] The works Ferrari 250s were second and third (Bandini ahead of Parkes). In fact all eleven Ferraris qualified in the top sixteen places. Hill got his Aston Martin to 4th, with his teammates in 8th and 10th, while the big Maserati was 6th on the grid.

Jo Bonnier got his two-litre Porsche in a very credible 17thwith a 4min 07.9, well ahead of his nearest competition – his teammates in 23rd (4min 13.2) and the GT Porsche in 26th with a distant 4min 35.8. The fastest of the small cars was the Alpine of Richard/Frescobaldi with 4min 42.8 (29th). The Rover turbine did a 4min 22.0 that would have qualified it mid-field, but being outside the field it had to start 30 seconds after flagfall at the back of the field.[14][2]

Race[edit]

Start[edit]

It was a sunny start for the race at 4pm. Phil Hill got his Aston Martin off the line first, ahead of the Ferraris. But it was the Frenchman André Simon in his Maserati who delighted the local crowd. He blasted past them, nudging Surtees out the way at Mulsanne then overtaking Hill before Arnage to lead the first lap.[5] Pat Ferguson planted his Lotus Elite into the sandbank at Mulsanne on the first lap, although he eventually managed to extricate it (only to plant it back in exactly the same spot on his next lap!).[18][19] On the second lap André Guilhaudin, owner-driver of the CD-DKW, crashed it at Indianapolis, but his damage was terminal.[11] Then on only the fifth lap, as the leaders were lapping the tail-enders, Roger Masson’s Bonnet clipped the verge on the brow after the Dunlop bridge. It spectacularly somersaulted twice but Masson got out unharmed.[6] Both Phil Hill, now running fourth, and Peter Sargent’s Lister hit debris and damaged their gearboxes trying to slow but were able to keep on running. Simon continued to lead throughout his opening 2-hour stint before handing over to his co-driver ‘Lucky’ Casner. However, only an hour into his race, Casner brought the Maserati in with terminal gearbox problems.[8] Likewise the earlier stress on the Hill Aston Martin and Sargent Lister took its toll and they too retired early with broken transmissions.[7][20]

Ferraris now assumed the top five positions. At the 4-hour mark the works 250s of Surtees/Mairesse and Parkes/Maglioli were ahead of the NART 330TR then Scarfiotti/Bandini in the other 250P and Noblet’s privateer 330. Sixth place was Bruce McLaren in his Aston Martin, leading the GT category. However at 8.20pm, a piston shattered in the engine while he was at speed going into the Mulsanne kink.[21] McLaren managed to get the car safely to the roadside but the long oil slick from the holed sump started a catastrophic chain reaction of accidents: Jean Kerguen’s DB4 Aston Martin spun out into a ditch, wrecking its differential. Sanderson endured a series of spins in his Cobra but luckily hit nothing and carried on.[16] Then Salvadori’s Jaguar arrived and spun at 265 kp/h (165 mph) and crashed into the banking. Fortunately, Salvadori (who had been unable to do up his full harness) was thrown out the rear window as the car burst into flames, then helped by Kerguen.[21][15] This was then hit by Jean-Pierre Manzon’s little Bonnet which rebounded into the middle of the track. Manzon, son of the great French racer Robert Manzon, was seriously injured and thrown onto the track. Christian Heins, leading his class and the Index of Performance, managed to avoid Manzon and the wrecks but in doing so, his Alpine-Renault went out of control, rolled and hit a lamp-post then exploded into flames. ‘Bino’ Heins, whose Willys franchise built the Alpines in Brazil, was killed instantly.[22][7][21][23]

Night[edit]

As night fell, Ferrari’s fortunes began to change: the Noblet/Guichet car had to retire after a Ferrari mechanic forgot to replace the oil filler cap.[6] Then Parkes and Maglioli were delayed, losing ten laps, to change the distributor.[4][24] Carlo Abate, in the works-run GTO, was running third just about midnight when he got off-line going through the tricky Maison Blanche corner. He crashed at speed, wrecking the car, but was not injured.[25] Not so fortunate was Bob Olthoff who crashed his Sebring Sprite there soon afterward and was taken to hospital with a broken collarbone.[12]

Through the night Surtees and Mairesse continued to build their lead over their teammates. The NART Ferrari had charged back up to third after being delayed. However around 2am an oil-line burst and destroyed Penske’s engine. Jo Bonnier, whose Porsche was running 7th and leading the medium-sized classes, came through the huge plume of engine smoke unsighted and crashed heavily in the trees. Bonnier was lucky to get away uninjured.[22][10]

An hour later, the Gurney/Hall NART Ferrari, now running third, suddenly slowed at Maison Blanche. Hall coasted towards the pits then pushed it the final distance only to be told that the half-shaft had broken.[6] The Kimberly/Schlesser Aston Martin inherited the place but the curse of third struck again soon before 2am, when they were forced to retire with piston problems, ending Aston Martin’s challenge.[7][24]

By the halfway mark at 4am, there were only 21 cars left running. However, Ferrari had the numbers to outlast their opposition. Surtees/Mairesse had done 189 laps, with a lap’s lead over Scarfiotti/Bandini. The works cars already had a massive 10-lap lead over the remaining NART Ferrari of Gregory/Piper, the two Belgian GTOs. Sixth was the Barth/Linge Porsche 718 moving past the Maranello Ferrari and Cunningham’s Jaguar, with the Parkes’ Ferrari charging back up the field in 9th. The Rover was cruising quietly just outside the top-10[21]

Morning[edit]

As dawn broke among the rising mist, David Hobbs in the Lola had a big accident at Maison Blanche. After running as high as 8th, the team had been battling the gearbox most of the night, losing two hours in the pits. Hobbs had been trying to change down for the corner when the gearbox finally jammed.[9] A few hours later the leading Porsche of Barth/Linge, now up to 5th, lost a rear wheel coming up to the main straight. Edgar Barth pushed it the half kilometre to the pits where it was repaired and carried on.[10][21]

Briggs Cunningham and Bob Grossman had steadily moved their Lightweight Jaguar into the top-10 through the night. However, on Sunday morning the brake pedal snapped as Grossman came to the end of the Mulsanne straight. The car slammed through three rows of haybales, scattering spectators, but he was able to get the car back to the pits.[26] Stealing parts from their third car that had retired in the first hour, they lost two hours but got back into the race.[15][21]

After leading for fifteen hours, Surtees and Mairesse had built up a two-lap lead. However at 10.45 Surtees pitted for fuel and a driver change. Mairesse got no further than the Esses when the car burst into flames. Fuel had carelessly been spilt in the engine bay and an electrics spark applying the brake lights ignited it. Mairesse got out, overalls on fire, before the car came to a halt. The mild burns to his face and arms kept him out of racing for two months.[4]

Their teammates Scarfiotti and Bandini moved up to take the lead they wouldn’t cede.[22]

Finish and post-race[edit]

In the end they won easily – by 16 laps. In a record distance, it was the widest winning margin since Bentley’s epic 1927 win (350 km).[3] With Scarfiotti, Bandini and Ferrari it was the first all-Italian victory, as well as being the first win for a mid- or rear-engined car. In a dominant display Ferrari took the top six places. The Scuderia shared the top places with the two Belgian GT teams racing each other: Parkes and Maglioli chased hard and only failed to catch the Equipe Nationale Belge GTO, in second, by just over 100 metres.[22] Fourth was the Ecurie Francorchamps GTO barely a lap behind. The Belgian drivers all celebrated together by driving to Paris two days later, and going to a nightclub till 4am leaving their respective racing cars parked outside.[25]

The Maranello team’s Ferrari came in 5th after battling overheating issues for most of the race.[6][24] Sixth, and last surviving Ferrari, was the NART 250 LMB of Gregory and Piper. It had been out of alignment since 8am when Gregory had gone off at Arnage taking an hour to dig it out of the sand-trap.[25]

After a remarkably trouble-free run (needing no mechanical work or even a change of tyres), the Rover turbine easily exceeded its 3600 km minimum distance (an average of 150 km/h) and was awarded the ACO’s FF25000 prize. Although not classified, it covered sufficient distance that it would have finished 7thand beaten the 1958 winning car.[14][3][27] In fact, classified 7th was the Sanderson/Bolton AC Cobra

After their troubles, the Barth/Linge Porsche came in 8th and Cunningham’s Jaguar came in 9th. After the race-start antics the Lotus Elite of Ferguson and Wagstaff, finished tenth and class-winner.

Despite the good weather, attrition was high and the number of major accidents meant there were only fourteen cars running at the end of the 49 starters. The sole surviving Bonnet won the Index of Thermal Efficiency, driven by Claude Bobrowski and young debutante motorcyclist Jean-Pierre Beltoise

Official results[edit]

Finishers[edit]

Results taken from Quentin Spurring's book, officially licensed by the ACO[28] Class Winners are in Bold text.

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Laps
1 P
3.0
21 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC Italy Ludovico Scarfiotti
Italy Lorenzo Bandini
Ferrari 250P Ferrari 3.0L V12 339
2 GT
3.0
24 Belgium Equipe Nationale Belge Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Belgium Gérard Langlois van Ophem
Ferrari 250 GTO Ferrari 3.0L V12 323
3 P
3.0
22 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom Mike Parkes
Italy Umberto Maglioli
Ferrari 250P Ferrari 3.0L V12 323
4 GT
3.0
25 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps France Pierre Dumay
Belgium “Eldé” (Leon Dernier)
Ferrari 250 GTO Ferrari 3.0L V12 322
5 P
+3.0
12 United Kingdom Maranello Concessionaires Ltd. United Kingdom Mike Salmon
United Kingdom Jack Sears
Ferrari 330 LMB Ferrari 4.0L V12 314
6 GT
3.0
26 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
United Kingdom David Piper
Ferrari 250 GTO LMB Ferrari 3.0L V12 312
N/C * Exp 00 United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation United Kingdom Graham Hill
United States Richie Ginther
Rover-BRM Rover Turbine 310
7 GT
+3.0
3 United Kingdom AC Cars Ltd United Kingdom Ninian Sanderson
United Kingdom Peter Bolton
AC Cobra Hardtop Ford 4.7L V8 310
8 P
2.0
28 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Edgar Barth
Germany Herbert Linge
Porsche 718/8 W-RS Spyder Porsche 1962cc F8 300
9 GT
+3.0
15 United States Briggs Cunningham United States Briggs Cunningham
United States Bob Grossman
Jaguar E-Type Lightweight Jaguar 3.8L S6 283
10 GT
1.3
39 United Kingdom Team Elite United Kingdom Pat Ferguson
United Kingdom John Wagstaff
Lotus Elite Mk14 Coventry Climax 1216cc S4 270
11 P
1.15
53 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Claude Bobrowski
France Jean-Pierre Beltoise
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 Renault-Gordini 1108cc S4 269
12 GT
2.0
31 United States A. Hutcheson
(private entrant)
United States Alan Hutcheson
United Kingdom Paddy Hopkirk
MG MGB Hardtop BMC 1803cc S4 264
N/C** P
1.15
41 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Robert Bouharde
Italy Bruno Basini
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 Renault-Gordini 1108cc S4 211
  • Note *: Not Classified as car was in Experimental class.
  • Note **: Not Classified because Insufficient distance covered.

Did Not Finish[edit]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Laps Reason
DNF P
3.0
23 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom John Surtees
Belgium Willy Mairesse
Ferrari 250P Ferrari 3.0L V12 252 fuel spill / fire
(19hr)
DNF P
1.0
50 France Automobiles Alpine France Bernard Boyer
France Guy Verrier
Alpine A110 M63 Renault-Gordini 996cc S4 227 conrod
(23hr)
DNF GT
1.6
32 United Kingdom Sunbeam Talbot United Kingdom Keith Ballisat
United Kingdom Jack Lewis
Sunbeam Alpine Sunbeam 1592cc S4 200 engine
(19hr)
DNF GT
1.3
38 United Kingdom Team Elite Australia Frank Gardner
United Kingdom John Coundley
Lotus Elite Mk14 Coventry Climax 1216cc S4 167 engine
(16hr)
DNF GT
1.6
34 Italy Scuderia Sant Ambroeus Italy Giancarlo Sala
Italy Romolo Rossi
Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 155 gearbox
(16hr)
DNF P
+3.0
6 United Kingdom Lola Cars Ltd. United Kingdom David Hobbs
United Kingdom Richard Attwood
Lola Mk6 GT Ford 4.7L V8 151 accident
(15hr)
DNF P
+3.0
7 United Kingdom David Brown Racing Dept. United States William Kimberly
France Jo Schlesser
Aston Martin DP214 Aston Martin 3.7L S6 139 piston
(11hr)
DNF P
+3.0
11 United States North American Racing Team United States Dan Gurney
United States Jim Hall
Ferrari 330 LMB Ferrari 4.0L V12 126 gearbox
(10hr)
DSQ GT
+3.0
4 United States E. Hugus
(private entrant)
United States Ed Hugus
United Kingdom Peter Jopp
AC Cobra Coupé Ford 4.7L V8 117 premature oilchange
(10hr)
DNF GT
2.0
30 Germany Porsche System Engineering Netherlands Ben Pon
Switzerland Heinz Schiller
Porsche 356B GS Porsche 1967cc F4 115 engine
(10hr)
DNF P
+3.0
10 United States North American Racing Team Mexico Pedro Rodríguez
United States Roger Penske
Ferrari 330 TRI/LM Ferrari 4.0L V12 113 oil line
(9hr)
DSQ P
1.0
44 United Kingdom Lawrence Tune Engineering United Kingdom Chris Lawrence
United Kingdom Chris Spender
Deep Sanderson 301 BMC 997cc S4 110 insufficient distance
(15hr)
DNF P
3.0
27 Germany Porsche System Engineering Sweden Joakim ‘Jo’ Bonnier
South Africa Tony Maggs
Porsche 718/8 GTR Coupé Porsche 1981cc F8 109 accident
(9hr)
DNF GT
3.0
20 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC Italy Carlo Maria Abate
France Fernand Tavano
Ferrari 250 GTO Ferrari 3.0L V12 105 accident
(9hr)
DSQ P
1.0
58 France J-G. Branche
(private entrant)
France Jean-Georges Branche
Belgium Claude Dubois
Abarth 850 Fiat 847cc S4 96 premature refuel
(12hr)
DNF GT
2.0
29 Germany Porsche System Engineering Netherlands Carel Godin de Beaufort
Germany Gerhard Koch
Porsche 356B GS Porsche 1967cc F4 94 engine
(8hr)
DNF P
1.15
42 United Kingdom Donald Healey Motor Company South Africa Bob Olthoff
United Kingdom Sir John Whitmore
Austin-Healey Sebring Sprite BMC 1101cc S4 94 accident
(9hr)
DNF GT
1.6
33 United Kingdom Sunbeam Talbot United Kingdom Peter Harper
United Kingdom Peter Procter
Sunbeam Alpine Sunbeam 1592cc S4 93 head gasket
(13hr)
DNF P
+3.0
9 Belgium P. Noblet
(private entrant)
Belgium Pierre Noblet
France Jean Guichet
Ferrari 330 LMB Ferrari 4.0L V12 79 oil pipe
(8hr)
DSQ GT
1.6
35 Italy Scuderia Sant Ambroeus Italy Giampiero Biscaldi
Italy “Kim” (Sergio Pedretti)
Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 70 premature oilchange
(7hr)
DNF GT
+3.0
19 France J. Kerguen
(private entrant)
France Jean Kerguen
France “Franc” (Jacques Dewes)
Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato Aston Martin 3.7L S6 65 accident / rear axle
(7hr)
DNF P
1.0
49 France Automobiles Alpine France René Richard
Italy Piero Frescobaldi
Alpine A110 M63 Renault-Gordini 996cc S4 63 clutch
(8hr)
DNF GT
+3.0
8 United Kingdom David Brown Racing Dept. New Zealand Bruce McLaren
United Kingdom Innes Ireland
Aston Martin DP214 Aston Martin 3.7L S6 59 piston
(6hr)
DNF P
1.0
48 France Automobiles Alpine Brazil Christian ‘Bino’ Heins
France José Rosinski
Alpine A110 M63 Renault-Gordini 996cc S4 50 fatal accident
(6hr)
DNF P
1.0
52 France Urbain Fabre France Jean-Pierre Manzon
France Jean Rolland
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 Renault-Gordini 996cc S4 47 accident
(6hr)
DNF P
+3.0
2 France Maserati France France André Simon
United States Lloyd Casner
Maserati Tipo 151/3 Coupé Maserati 4.9L V8 40 gearbox
(4hr)
DNF GT
+3.0
16 United States Briggs Cunningham United Kingdom Roy Salvadori
United States Paul Richards
Jaguar E-Type Lightweight Jaguar 3.8L S6 40 accident
(6hr)
DNF P
+3.0
17 United Kingdom P.J. Sargent
(private entrant)
United Kingdom Peter Sargent
United Kingdom Peter Lumsden
Lister Costin Coupe Jaguar 3.8L S6 29 engine
(4hr)
DNF P
+3.0
18 United Kingdom David Brown Racing Dept. United States Phil Hill
Belgium Lucien Bianchi
Aston Martin DP215 Aston Martin 4.0L S6 29 gearbox
(4hr)
DNF P
1.0
54 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Gérard Laureau
France Jean Vinatier
Bonnet RB5 Renault 716cc S4 25 out of fuel
(3hr)
DNF GT
+3.0
14 United States Briggs Cunningham United States Walt Hansgen
United States Augie Pabst
Jaguar E-Type Lightweight Jaguar 3.8L S6 8 gearbox
(1hr)
DNF GT
1.6
36 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Karl Foitek
Switzerland Armand Schäfer
Alfa Romeo Giulietta GZ Alfa Romeo 1570cc S4 7 valve gear
(2hr)
DNF P
1.0
51 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Roger Masson
France Pierre Monneret
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 Renault-Gordini 996cc S4 4 accident
(1hr)
DNF P
1.0
55 France "Sarayac"
(private entrant)
France “Sarayac” (Guy Flayac)
France Lucien Barthe
Abarth 1000 SP Fiat 998cc S4 3 engine
(1hr)
DNF P
1.0
56 Germany Auto Union GmbH France André Guilhaudin
France Alain Bertaut
CD-DKW Coupé DKW 750cc S3
(2-Stroke)
1 accident
(1hr)

Did Not Practise[edit]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Engine Reason
DNP GT
+3.0
1 United States A.Green
(private entrant)
United States Jerry Grant
United States Don Campbell
Chevrolet Corvette (C2) Chevrolet 5.4L V8 did not arrive
DNP GT
+3.0
5 United Kingdom Lola Cars Ltd. South Africa Tony Maggs
Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland John Love
Lola Mk6 GT Ford 4.7L V8 did not arrive
in time
DNP GT
1.3
40 Belgium Equipe Nationale Belge Belgium Claude Dubois
Belgium Georges Harris
Lotus Elite Mk14 Coventry Climax 1216cc S4 did not arrive
DNP P
1.0
44 Switzerland Equipe Lausannoise Belgium Bernard Collomb Deep Sanderson 301 BMC 997cc S4 did not arrive
DNP P
1.15
43 Switzerland Scuderia Filipinetti Switzerland Herbert Müller
Switzerland Jean-Jacques Thuner
ASA 1000 GT ASA 1032cc S4 did not arrive
DNP P
1.0
46 Italy Scuderia AS Elmo d’Argento France Jean Vinatier
France Paul Condrillier
ASA 1000 GT ASA 996cc S4 did not arrive
DNP P
1.0
47 Italy Scuderia AS Elmo d’Argento Italy Carlo Facetti
Italy Giorgio Bassi
ASA 1000 GT ASA 996cc S4 did not arrive

Class Winners[edit]

Class Prototype Winners Class GT Winners
Prototype
>3000
#12 Ferrari 330 LMB Salmon / Sears Grand Touring
>3000
#3 AC Cobra Sanderson / Bolton
Prototype
3000
#21 Ferrari 250 P Scarfiotti / Bandini Grand Touring
3000
#24 Ferrari 250 GTO “Beurlys”/ van Ophem
Prototype
2500
no entrants Grand Touring
2500
no entrants
Prototype
2000
#28 Porsche 718/8 Spyder Barth / Linge Grand Touring
2000
#31 MGB Hutcheson / Hopkirk
Prototype
1600
no entrants Grand Touring
1600
no finishers
Prototype
1300
no entrants Grand Touring
1300
#39 Lotus Elite Ferguson / Wagstaff
Prototype
1150
#53 Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 Bobrowski / Beltoise Grand Touring
1150
no entrants
Prototype
1000
no finishers Grand Touring
1000
no entrants

Index of Thermal Efficiency[edit]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Score
1 P
1.15
53 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Claude Bobrowski
France Jean-Pierre Beltoise
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 1.25
2 P
3.0
21 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC Italy Ludovico Scarfiotti
Italy Lorenzo Bandini
Ferrari 250P 1.18
3 GT
1.3
39 United Kingdom Team Elite United Kingdom Pat Ferguson
United Kingdom John Wagstaff
Lotus Elite Mk14 1.17
4 P
3.0
22 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom Mike Parkes
Italy Umberto Maglioli
Ferrari 250P 0.95
5 GT
3.0
26 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
United Kingdom David Piper
Ferrari 250 GTO LMB 0.93
6 GT
3.0
24 Belgium Equipe Nationale Belge Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Belgium Gérard Langlois van Ophem
Ferrari 250 GTO 0.90
7 GT
3.0
25 Belgium Ecurie Francorchamps France Pierre Dumay
Belgium “Eldé” (Leon Dernier)
Ferrari 250 GTO 0.85
8 GT
2.0
31 United States A. Hutcheson
(private entrant)
United States Alan Hutcheson
United Kingdom Paddy Hopkirk
MG MGB Hardtop 0.85
9 P
+3.0
12 United Kingdom Maranello Concessionaires Ltd. United Kingdom Mike Salmon
United Kingdom Jack Sears
Ferrari 330 LMB 0.85
10 P
2.0
28 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Edgar Barth
Germany Herbert Linge
Porsche 718/8 W-RS Spyder 0.84
  • Note: Only the top ten positions are included in this set of standings.

Index of Performance[edit]

Taken from Moity’s book, at odds with Quentin Spurring's book.[29]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Score
1 P
3.0
21 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC Italy Ludovico Scarfiotti
Italy Lorenzo Bandini
Ferrari 250P 1.236
2= GT
3.0
24 Belgium Equipe Nationale Belge Belgium “Beurlys” (Jean Blaton)
Belgium Gérard Langlois van Ophem
Ferrari 250 GTO 1.178
2= P
3.0
22 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom Mike Parkes
Italy Umberto Maglioli
Ferrari 250P 1.178
4 P
3.0
22 Italy SpA Ferrari SEFAC United Kingdom Mike Parkes
Italy Umberto Maglioli
Ferrari 250P 1.174
5 P
2.0
28 Germany Porsche System Engineering Germany Edgar Barth
Germany Herbert Linge
Porsche 718/8 W-RS Spyder 1.141
6 GT
3.0
26 United States North American Racing Team United States Masten Gregory
United Kingdom David Piper
Ferrari 250 GTO LMB 1.138
7 P
1.15
53 France Automobiles René Bonnet France Claude Bobrowski
France Jean-Pierre Beltoise
Bonnet Aérodjet LM6 1.121
8 P
+3.0
12 United Kingdom Maranello Concessionaires Ltd. United Kingdom Mike Salmon
United Kingdom Jack Sears
Ferrari 330 LMB 1.120
9 GT
1.3
39 United Kingdom Team Elite United Kingdom Pat Ferguson
United Kingdom John Wagstaff
Lotus Elite Mk14 1.102
10 GT
+3.0
3 United Kingdom AC Cars Ltd United Kingdom Ninian Sanderson
United Kingdom Peter Bolton
AC Cobra Hardtop 1.097
  • Note: Only the top ten positions are included in this set of standings. A score of 1.00 means meeting the minimum distance for the car, and a higher score is exceeding the nominal target distance.

Statistics[edit]

Taken from Quentin Spurring's book, officially licensed by the ACO

  • Fastest Lap in practice – P.Rodriguez, #10 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM – 3m 50.9s; 209.87 km/h (130.41 mph)
  • Fastest Lap – J.Surtees, #23 Ferrari 250 P – 3:53.3secs; 207.71 km/h (129.07 mph)
  • Distance – 4,561.71 km (2,834.52 mi)
  • Winner’s Average Speed – 176.82 km/h (109.87 mph)
  • Attendance – 300 000 [6][30]

Challenge Mondial de Vitesse et Endurance Standings[edit]

Pos Manufacturer Points
1 Italy Ferrari 39
2 West Germany Porsche 35
3 Italy Jaguar 22
4 Italy Alfa Romeo 10
Citations
  1. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.108
  2. ^ a b c d e Clarke 2009, p.117: Motor Jun16 1963
  3. ^ a b c d e Moity 1974, p.95
  4. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.110
  5. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.107
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Spurring 2010, p.115
  7. ^ a b c d e Spurring 2010, p.119
  8. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.120
  9. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.116
  10. ^ a b c d Spurring 2010, p.117
  11. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.125
  12. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.131
  13. ^ Clausager 1982, p.126
  14. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.112-113
  15. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.121
  16. ^ a b Spurring 2010, p.128
  17. ^ Spurring 2010, p.130
  18. ^ Spurring 2010, p.127
  19. ^ Armstrong 1964, p.146
  20. ^ Clarke 2009, p.118: Motor Jun16 1963
  21. ^ a b c d e f Clarke 2009, p.114-5: Road & Track Sep 1963
  22. ^ a b c d Spurring 2010, p.109
  23. ^ Peralta, Pablo Robert. "Christian Heins". historicracing.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. 
  24. ^ a b c Clarke 2009, p.119-20: Motor Jun16 1963
  25. ^ a b c Spurring 2010, p.124
  26. ^ Armstrong 1964, p.152
  27. ^ Armstrong 1964, p.142
  28. ^ Spurring 2010, p.2
  29. ^ Moity 1974, p.170
  30. ^ Moity 1974, p.92

References[edit]

  • Armstrong, Douglas – English editor (1964) Automobile Year #11 1963-64 Lausanne: Edita S.A.
  • Clarke, R.M. - editor (2009) Le Mans 'The Ferrari Years 1958-1965' Cobham, Surrey: Brooklands Books ISBN 1-85520-372-3
  • Clausager, Anders (1982) Le Mans London: Arthur Barker Ltd ISBN 0-213-16846-4
  • Laban, Brian (2001) Le Mans 24 Hours London: Virgin Books ISBN 1-85227-971-0
  • Moity, Christian (1974) The Le Mans 24 Hour Race 1949-1973 Radnor, Pennsylvania: Chilton Book Co ISBN 0-8019-6290-0
  • Spurring, Quentin (2010) Le Mans 1960-69 Yeovil, Somerset: Haynes Publishing ISBN 978-1-84425-584-9

External links[edit]

  • Racing Sports Cars – Le Mans 24 Hours 1962 entries, results, technical detail. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • Le Mans History – Le Mans History, hour-by-hour (incl. pictures, YouTube links). Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • Sportscars.tv – race commentary. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • World Sports Racing Prototypes – results, reserve entries & chassis numbers. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • Team Dan – results & reserve entries, explaining driver listings. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • Unique Cars & Parts – results & reserve entries. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • Formula 2 – Le Mans 1963 results & reserve entries. Retrieved 15 December 2017
  • Motorsport Memorial – article about Christian Heins. Retrieved 24 January 2018
  • YouTube – remastered, short British Pathé clip in colour (8 min). Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • YouTube – 4x 10min silent, colour clips from British Pathé of out-takes for anorther film. Retrieved 14 December 2017
  • YouTube – personal camera footage,silent, in colour (5 mins). Retrieved 14 December 2017