1964 United States Senate elections

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1964 United States Senate elections

← 1962 November 3, 1964 1966 →

35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Michael Joseph Mansfield.jpg EverettDirksen.jpg
Leader Mike Mansfield Everett Dirksen
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 1961 January 3, 1959
Leader's seat Montana Illinois
Seats before 66 34
Seats after 68 32
Seat change Increase 2 Decrease 2
Popular vote 30,217,130 22,654,661
Percentage 56.3% 42.2%
Swing Increase 5.9% Decrease 6.8%
Seats up 26 9
Races won 28 7

Us 1964 senate election map.svg
Results of the elections:
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold
     No election

Majority Leader before election

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

The 1964 United States Senate elections coincided with the election of President Lyndon B. Johnson by an overwhelming majority, to a full term. His Democratic Party picked up a net two seats from the Republicans. As of 2020, this is the last time either party has had a two-thirds majority in the Senate, which would have hypothetically allowed the Senate Democrats to override a veto, convict and expel certain officials, or invoke cloture without any votes from Republicans. The Senate election coincided with Democratic gains in the House in the same year.

Notably, of the 35 seats up for election this year, 26 were held by Democrats, who managed to retain 25 of them. A party defending two-thirds of the seats up for election would not make net gains in the Senate again until 2012. Coincidentally, it would be the same Senate class, class 1.

Results summary[edit]

68 32
Democratic Republican
Parties Total
Democratic Republican Other
Last election (1962) 67 33 0 100
Before these elections 66 34 0 100
Not up 40 25 0 65
Up 26 9 35
Class 1 (1958→1964) 24 9 33
Special: Class 2 2 0 2
Incumbent retired 1 1 2
Held by same party 1 1 2
Replaced by other party 0 0 0
Result 1 1 0 2
Incumbent ran 25 8 33
Won re-election 23 5 28
Lost re-election Decrease3 Republicans replaced by Increase3 Democrats
Decrease1 Democrat replaced by Increase1 Republican
4
Lost renomination,
but held by same party
1 0 1
Result 27 6 0 33
Total elected 28 7 0 35
Net gain/loss Increase2 Decrease2 Steady 2
Nationwide vote 30,217,130 22,654,661 843,229 53,715,020
Share 56.25% 42.18% 1.57% 100%
Result 68 32 0 100

Source: Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives (1965). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 3, 1964" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 54.

Retirements[edit]

There were no net party changes from retirements.

Republicans replaced by Republicans[edit]

  1. Arizona: Barry Goldwater retired to run for President. He was replaced by Paul Fannin (R)

Democrats replaced by Democrats[edit]

  1. Tennessee (Class 2): Appointee Herbert S. Walters (D) was replaced by Ross Bass (D)

Incumbents who lost elections[edit]

Democrats had a two-seat net gain from beating incumbents.

Democrats lost to Republicans[edit]

  1. California: Appointee Pierre Salinger (D) lost to George Murphy (R).

Democrats lost to Democrats[edit]

  1. Oklahoma (Class 2): Appointee J. Howard Edmondson (D) lost nomination to Fred R. Harris (D), who won the general election.

Republicans lost to Democrats[edit]

  1. Maryland: James Glenn Beall (R) lost to Joseph D. Tydings (D).
  2. New Mexico: Edwin L. Mechem (R) lost to Joseph M. Montoya (D).
  3. New York: Kenneth B. Keating (R) lost to Robert F. Kennedy (D).

Other races[edit]

In a close race in Nevada, Democratic incumbent Howard Cannon won re-election over Republican Lieutenant Governor Paul Laxalt by fewer than 100 votes. Laxalt joined Cannon in the Senate when he won Nevada's other seat in 1974.

Subsequent gains[edit]

  1. Michigan: Patrick V. McNamara (D) died April 30, 1966, and was replaced May 11, 1966 by appointee Robert P. Griffin (R).

Change in composition[edit]

Before the elections[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Calif.
Ran
D42
Conn.
Ran
D43
Fla.
Ran
D44
Ind.
Ran
D45
Maine
Ran
D46
Mass.
Ran
D47
Mich.
Ran
D48
Minn.
Ran
D49
Miss.
Ran
D50
Mo.
Ran
Majority → D51
Mont.
Ran
D60
Texas
Ran
D59
Tenn. (sp)
Retired
D58
Tenn. (reg)
Ran
D57
R.I.
Ran
D56
Okla. (sp)
Ran
D55
Ohio
Ran
D54
N.D.
Ran
D53
N.J.
Ran
D52
Nev.
Ran
D61
Utah
Ran
D62
Va.
Ran
D63
Wash.
Ran
D64
W.Va.
Ran
D65
Wis.
Ran
D66
Wyo.
Ran
R34
Vt.
Ran
R33
Pa.
Ran
R32
N.Y.
Ran
R31
N.M. (sp)
N.M. (reg)
Ran
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26
Ariz.
Retired
R27
Del.
Ran
R28
Hawaii
Ran
R29
Md.
Ran
R30
Neb.
Ran
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

Elections results[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Conn.
Re-elected
D42
Fla.
Re-elected
D43
Ind.
Re-elected
D44
Maine
Re-elected
D45
Mass.
Re-elected
D46
Mich.
Re-elected
D47
Minn.
Re-elected
D48
Miss.
Re-elected
D49
Mo.
Re-elected
D50
Mont.
Re-elected
Majority → D51
Nev.
Re-elected
D60
Utah
Re-elected
D59
Texas
Re-elected
D58
Tenn. (sp)
Hold
D57
Tenn. (reg)
Re-elected
D56
R.I.
Re-elected
D55
Okla. (sp)
Hold
D54
Ohio
Re-elected
D53
N.D.
Re-elected
D52
N.J.
Re-elected
D61
Va.
Re-elected
D62
Wash.
Re-elected
D63
W.Va.
Re-elected
D64
Wis.
Re-elected
D65
Wyo.
Re-elected
D66
Md.
Gain
D67
N.M. (sp)
N.M. (reg)
Gain
D68
N.Y.
Gain
R32
Calif.
Gain
R31
Vt.
Re-elected
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26
Ariz.
Hold
R27
Del.
Re-elected
R28
Hawaii
Re-elected
R29
Neb.
Re-elected
R30
Pa.
Re-elected
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summary[edit]

Special elections during the 88th Congress[edit]

In these special elections, the winner was seated during 1964 or before January 3, 1965; ordered by election date, then state.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
New Mexico
(Class 1)
Edwin L. Mechem Republican 1962 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Winner also elected to the next term, see below.
Oklahoma
(Class 2)
J. Howard Edmondson Democratic 1963 (Appointed) Appointee lost nomination to finish term.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Tennessee
(Class 2)
Herbert S. Walters Democratic 1963 (Appointed) Appointee retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.

Elections leading to the next Congress[edit]

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1965; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 1 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Arizona Barry Goldwater Republican 1952
1958
Incumbent retired to run for President of the United States.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
California Pierre Salinger Democratic 1964 (Appointed) Appointee lost election to next term.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Connecticut Thomas J. Dodd Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Delaware John J. Williams Republican 1946
1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Florida Spessard Holland Democratic 1946 (Appointed)
1946
1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Hawaii Hiram Fong Republican 1959 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana Vance Hartke Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Maine Edmund Muskie Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Maryland James Glenn Beall Republican 1952
1958
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Massachusetts Ted Kennedy Democratic 1962 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan Philip Hart Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Philip Hart (Democratic) 64.4%
  • Elly M. Peterson (Republican) 35.3%
  • Ernest C. Smith (Freedom Now) 0.1%
  • Evelyn Sell (Socialist Workers) 0.09%
  • James Sim (Socialist Labor) 0.05%
Minnesota Eugene McCarthy Democratic-Farmer-Labor[1] 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi John C. Stennis Democratic 1947 (Special)
1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri Stuart Symington Democratic 1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Montana Mike Mansfield Democratic 1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska Roman Hruska Republican 1954 (Special)
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Roman Hruska (Republican) 61.4%
  • Raymond W. Arndt (Democratic) 38.6%
Nevada Howard Cannon Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey Harrison A. Williams Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
New Mexico Edwin L. Mechem Republican 1962 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Winner was also elected to finish the term, see above.
New York Kenneth Keating Republican 1958 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
North Dakota Quentin Burdick Democratic 1960 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio Stephen M. Young Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania Hugh Scott Republican 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Rhode Island John Pastore Democratic 1950 (Special)
1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Tennessee Albert Gore Sr. Democratic 1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Texas Ralph Yarborough Democratic 1957 (Special)
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Utah Frank Moss Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Vermont Winston L. Prouty Republican 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
Virginia Harry F. Byrd Democratic 1933 (Appointed)
1933 (Special)
1934
1940
1946
1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Washington Henry M. Jackson Democratic 1952
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
West Virginia Robert Byrd Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Robert Byrd (Democratic) 67.7%
  • Cooper P. Benedict (Republican) 32.3%
Wisconsin William Proxmire Democratic 1957 (Special)
1958
Incumbent re-elected.
Wyoming Gale W. McGee Democratic 1958 Incumbent re-elected.

Arizona[edit]

Arizona election

← 1958
1970 →
  Paul Fannin.jpg No image.png
Nominee Paul Fannin Roy Elson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 241,089 227,712
Percentage 51.43% 48.57%

1964 Arizona.png
Red: counties won by Fannin, Blue: counties won by Elson.

U.S. senator before election

Barry Goldwater
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Paul Fannin
Republican

Incumbent Barry Goldwater decided not to run for re-election to a third term, instead running for President of the United States as the Republican Party nominee against Lyndon B. Johnson.[2] Governor of Arizona Paul Fannin ran unopposed in the Republican primary, and defeated Democratic nominee Roy Elson, who was a staff member for U.S. senator Carl Hayden until Hayden's retirement in 1969. Despite a landslide loss throughout the country, and Goldwater only able to obtain 50.45% of the vote in his home state of Arizona, Fannin managed to prevail in the state's Senate election.

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Roy Elson 76,697 41.41
Democratic Renz L. Jennings 64,331 34.73
Democratic Howard V. Peterson 22,424 12.11
Democratic George Gavin 10,291 5.56
Democratic Raymond G. Neely 6,022 3.25
Democratic Robert P. Ketterer 5,460 2.95
Total votes 185,225 100.00
1964 United States Senate election in Arizona[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Fannin 241,089 51.43
Democratic Roy Elson 227,712 48.57
Majority 13,377 2.86
Turnout 468,801
Republican hold

California[edit]

California election

← 1958
1970 →
  GeorgeMurphy.jpg PierreSalinger.jpg
Nominee George Murphy Pierre Salinger
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 3,628,552 3,411,915
Percentage 51.54% 48.46%

1964 US Senate Election in California by county.svg
County Results

Murphy:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Salinger:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. senator before election

Pierre Salinger
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

George Murphy
Republican

1964 United States Senate election in California[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George Murphy 3,628,552 51.54
Democratic Pierre Salinger (Incumbent) 3,411,915 48.46
Majority 216,537 3.08
Turnout 7,040,467
Republican gain from Democratic

Connecticut[edit]

Connecticut election

← 1958
1970 →
  Thomasjdodd.jpg John Davis Lodge.jpg
Nominee Thomas J. Dodd John Davis Lodge
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 781,008 426,939
Percentage 64.66% 35.34%

U.S. senator before election

Thomas J. Dodd
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Thomas J. Dodd
Democratic

Democrat Thomas J. Dodd was re-elected and served a second term. John Davis Lodge, grandson of Henry Cabot Lodge was defeated by almost 30%.

1964 United States Senate election in Connecticut[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Thomas J. Dodd 781,008 64.66
Republican John Davis Lodge 426,939 35.34
Majority 354,069 29.32
Turnout 1,207,947
Democratic hold

Delaware[edit]

Delaware election

← 1958
1970 →
  JohnJWilliams.jpg Elbert N. Carvel 1962.jpg
Nominee John J. Williams Elbert Carvel
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 103,782 96,850
Percentage 51.71% 48.26%

Delaware Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County Results
Williams:      50-60%

U.S. senator before election

John J. Williams
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John J. Williams
Republican

1964 United States Senate election in Delaware[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Williams (Incumbent) 103,782 51.71
Democratic Elbert N. Carvel 96,850 48.26
Socialist Labor Joseph B. Hollon Sr. 71 0.04
Majority 6,932 3.45
Turnout 200,703
Republican hold

Florida[edit]

Florida election

← 1958
1970 →
  Spessard Holland.JPG Claude Kirk 1967.jpg
Nominee Spessard Holland Claude R. Kirk Jr.
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 997,585 562,212
Percentage 63.93% 36.03%

Florida Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County Results

Holland:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

Kirk:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Spessard Holland
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Spessard Holland
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in Florida[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Spessard L. Holland (Incumbent) 997,585 63.93
Republican Claude R. Kirk Jr. 562,212 36.03
None Scattering 540 0.03
Majority 435,373 27.90
Turnout 1,560,337
Democratic hold

Hawaii[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Hawaii[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hiram Fong (Incumbent) 110,747 53.04
Democratic Thomas P. Gill 96,789 46.35
Independent Lawrence Domine 1,278 0.61
Majority 3,958 6.69
Turnout 208,814
Republican hold

Indiana[edit]

Indiana election

← 1958
1970 →
  Vance Hartke.jpg Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Vance Hartke D. Russell Bontrager
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,128,505 941,519
Percentage 54.33% 45.33%

U.S. senator before election

Vance Hartke
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Vance Hartke
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in Indiana[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vance Hartke (Incumbent) 1,128,505 54.33
Republican D. Russell Bontrager 941,519 45.33
Prohibition J. Ralston Miller 5,708 0.27
Socialist Labor Casimer Kanczuzewski 1,231 0.06
Majority 187,986 9.00
Turnout 2,076,963
Democratic hold

Maine[edit]

Maine election

← 1958
1970 →
  Edmund Muskie.jpg Clifford G. McIntire (Maine Congressman).jpg
Nominee Edmund Muskie Clifford McIntire
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 253,511 127,040
Percentage 66.62% 33.38%

Maine Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results
Muskie:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
McIntire:      50–60%

U.S. senator before election

Edmund Muskie
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Edmund Muskie
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in Maine[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edmund S. Muskie (Incumbent) 253,511 66.62
Republican Clifford McIntire 127,040 33.38
Majority 126,471 33.24
Turnout 380,551
Democratic hold

Maryland[edit]

Maryland election

← 1958
1970 →
  Joseph d tydings.jpg Jamesglennbeall.jpg
Nominee Joseph D. Tydings James Glenn Beall
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 678,649 402,393
Percentage 62.78% 37.22%

Maryland Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results
Tydings:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Beall:      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

James Glenn Beall
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Joseph D. Tydings
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in Maryland[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph D. Tydings 678,649 62.78
Republican James Glenn Beall (Incumbent) 402,393 37.22
None Write-Ins 7 0.00
Majority 276,256 25.56
Turnout 1,081,049
Democratic gain from Republican

Incumbent Republican John Glenn Bell lost re-election 63%-37% to U.S. Attorney Joseph D. Tydings, a Democrat.

Massachusetts[edit]

Massachusetts election

← 1962
1970 →
  Ted Kennedy, 1967 (cropped).jpg No image.png
Nominee Ted Kennedy Howard J. Whitmore Jr.
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,716,907 587,663
Percentage 74.26% 25.42%

Massachusetts Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County Results

U.S. senator before election

Ted Kennedy
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Ted Kennedy
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Ted Kennedy defeated his challengers. Much of the campaign-appearance burden on behalf of Ted Kennedy fell on his wife, Joan, because of Ted's serious back injury in a plane crash.

Candidates:

General election[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edward M. Kennedy (Incumbent) 1,716,907 74.26 +21.3
Republican Howard J. Whitmore Jr. 587,663 25.42 -19.08
Socialist Labor Lawrence Gilfedder 4,745 0.21 -0.03
Prohibition Grace F. Luder 2,700 0.12 +0.05
Majority 1,129,244 50.84
Turnout 2,312,028
Democratic hold Swing

Michigan[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Michigan[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Philip A. Hart (Incumbent) 1,996,912 64.38
Republican Elly M. Peterson 1,096,272 35.34
Freedom Now Ernest C. Smith 4,125 0.13
Socialist Workers Evelyn Sell 2,754 0.09
Socialist Labor James Sim 1,598 0.05
None Scattering 6 0.00
Majority 90,640 29.04
Turnout 3,101,667
Democratic hold

Minnesota[edit]

Minnesota election

← 1958
1970 →
  EugeneMcCarthy.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Eugene J. McCarthy Wheelock Whitney Jr.
Party Democratic (DFL) Republican
Popular vote 931,363 605,933
Percentage 60.34% 39.26%

U.S. senator before election

Eugene J. McCarthy
Democratic (DFL)

Elected U.S. senator

Eugene J. McCarthy
Democratic (DFL)

Incumbent Democrat Eugene McCarthy defeated Republican challenger Wheelock Whitney Jr., to win a second term.

Democratic primary election results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (DFL) Eugene J. McCarthy (Incumbent) 245,068 90.47
Democratic (DFL) R. H. Underdahl 14,562 5.38
Democratic (DFL) Joseph Nowak 11,267 4.16
Republican primary election results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wheelock Whitney Jr. 161,363 100.00
General election results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (DFL) Eugene J. McCarthy (Incumbent) 931,363 60.34
Republican Wheelock Whitney Jr. 605,933 39.26
Industrial Government William Braatz 3,947 0.26
Socialist Workers Everett E. Luoma 2,357 0.15
Majority 325,420 21.09
Turnout 1,543,590
Democratic (DFL) hold

Mississippi[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Mississippi[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John C. Stennis (Incumbent) 343,364 100.00
Democratic hold

Missouri[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Missouri[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stuart Symington (Incumbent) 1,186,666 66.55
Republican Jean Paul Bradshaw 596,377 33.45
Majority 590,289 33.10
Turnout 1,783,043
Democratic hold

Montana[edit]

Montana election

← 1958
1970 →
  Michael Joseph Mansfield.jpg No image.png
Nominee Mike Mansfield Alex Blewett
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 180,643 99,367
Percentage 64.51% 35.49%

U.S. senator before election

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Mike Mansfield, who was first elected to the Senate in 1952 and was re-elected in 1958, ran for re-election. Mansfield won the Democratic primary in a landslide, and advanced to the general election, where he faced Alex Blewett, the Majority Leader of the Montana House of Representatives and the Republican nominee. Though Mansfield's margin was significantly reduced from 1958, he still overwhelmingly defeated Blewett and won his third term in the Senate.

Democratic Party primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Mansfield (Incumbent) 109,904 85.51
Democratic Joseph P. Monaghan 18,630 14.49
Total votes 128,534 100.00
Republican Primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alex Blewett 31,934 59.37
Republican Lyman Brewster 12,375 23.01
Republican Antoinette F. Rosell 9,480 17.62
Total votes 53,789 100.00
1964 United States Senate election in Montana[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mike Mansfield (Incumbent) 180,643 64.51 -11.71%
Republican Alex Blewett 99,367 35.49 +11.71%
Majority 81,276 29.03 -23.41%
Turnout 280,010
Democratic hold Swing

Nebraska[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Nebraska[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roman L. Hruska (Incumbent) 345,772 61.37
Democratic Raymond W. Arndt 217,605 38.62
None Scattering 24 0.00
Majority 128,167 22.75
Turnout 563,401
Republican hold

Nevada[edit]

Nevada election

← 1958
1970 →
  Howard Cannon.jpg Governor Laxalt (cropped).jpg
Nominee Howard Cannon Paul Laxalt
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 67,336 67,288
Percentage 50.02% 49.98%

U.S. senator before election

Howard Cannon
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Howard Cannon
Democratic

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Howard Cannon won re-election to a second term by a slim margin of only 48 votes.

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Howard Cannon
(Incumbent)
67,336 50.02 -7.66
Republican Paul Laxalt,
(Lieutenant Governor of Nevada and former Ormsby County District Attorney)
67,288 49.98 +7.66
Majority 48 0.04 -15.32
Turnout 134,624
Democratic hold Swing

New Jersey[edit]

New Jersey election

← 1958
1970 →
  Harrison Williams(D-NJ).jpg Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Harrison A. Williams Bernard M. Shanley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,677,515 1,011,280
Percentage 61.91% 37.32%

New Jersey Senate Election, 1964.svg
County results
Williams:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Shanley:      50-60%

U.S. senator before election

Harrison A. Williams
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Harrison A. Williams
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in New Jersey[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Harrison A. Williams (Incumbent) 1,677,515 61.91
Republican Bernard M. Shanley 1,011,280 37.32
Conservative Harold P. Poeschel 7,582 0.28
Socialist Workers Lawrence Stewart 6,147 0.23
America First John Valgene Mahalchik 4,926 0.18
Socialist Labor Albert Ronis 2,125 0.08
Majority 666,235 23.58
Turnout 2,709,575
Democratic hold

New Mexico[edit]

New Mexico (regular)[edit]

New Mexico election

← 1958
1970 →
  Joseph M Montoya.jpg Edwin Mechem.jpg
Nominee Joseph Montoya Edwin L. Mechem
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 178,209 147,562
Percentage 54.7% 45.3%

U.S. senator before election

Edwin L. Mechem
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Joseph Montoya
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Edwin L. Mechem sought re-election to a full term, but was defeated by Democrat Joseph Montoya.

Montoya was Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico (1947–1951 and 1955–1957) and a four-term member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1957–1964).

General election results[15][5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Montoya 178,209 54.70
Republican Edwin L. Mechem (Incumbent) 147,562 45.30
Majority 30,647 9.41
Total votes 325,771 100.00
Democratic gain from Republican

New Mexico (special)[edit]

Montoya was also elected to finish the term ending January 3, 1965.

New York[edit]

New York election

← 1958
1970 →
  Robert F. Kennedy 1964.jpeg Senator Kenneth Keating.jpg
Nominee Robert F. Kennedy Kenneth Keating
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 3,823,749 3,104,056
Percentage 53.5% 43.4%

NewYorkSenatorial1964.svg
County Results

U.S. senator before election

Kenneth Keating
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Robert F. Kennedy
Democratic

Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Kenneth Keating ran for re-election to a second term, but was defeated by Robert F. Kennedy.

The Socialist Labor state convention met on March 29 and nominated John Emanuel.[16] The Republican state convention met on August 31, and re-nominated the incumbent U.S. Senator Kenneth B. Keating.[17] The Conservative state convention met on August 31 at Saratoga Springs, New York, and nominated Prof. Henry Paolucci.[18] The Democratic state convention met on September 1, and nominated U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on the first ballot with 968 votes against 153 for Congressman Samuel S. Stratton.[19] The Liberal Party met on September 1, and endorsed the Democratic nominee, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.[20] The Socialist Workers Party filed a petition to nominate candidates on September 7. Richard Garza was nominated.[21]

John English, a Nassau County leader who helped John F. Kennedy during the 1960 presidential election, encouraged Robert Kennedy to oppose Keating. At the time, Samuel S. Stratton, a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York's 35th congressional district, was considered the most likely Democratic candidate. At first, Kennedy resisted. After President Kennedy's assassination, Robert Kennedy remained as Attorney General for Lyndon B. Johnson. However, Johnson and Kennedy feuded. Kennedy decided to run for the Senate in New York in August, and resigned from the Cabinet on September 3, 1964. While many reform Democrats resisted Kennedy, support from Robert F. Wagner Jr., and party bosses like Charles A. Buckley, of The Bronx, and Peter J. Crotty,[22] of Buffalo, helped Kennedy win the nomination at the party convention.[23]

During the campaign, Kennedy was frequently met by large crowds. Keating accused Kennedy of being a carpetbagger from Massachusetts. Kennedy responded to these charges in a televised town meeting by saying, "If the senator of the state of New York is going be selected on who's lived here the longest, then I think people are going vote for my opponent. If it's going be selected on who's got the best New York accent, then I think I'm probably out too. But I think if it's going be selected on the basis of who can make the best United States senator, I think I'm still in the contest."[24]

The Democratic/Liberal candidate was elected. Campaign help from President Lyndon B. Johnson, as well as the Democratic landslide after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, helped carry Kennedy into office, as Kennedy polled about 1.1 million votes less in New York than Johnson did. The incumbent Keating was defeated.

1964 state election result
Ticket U.S. Senator
Democratic Green tickY Robert F. Kennedy 3,539,746
Liberal Green tickY Robert F. Kennedy 284,646
Republican Kenneth B. Keating 3,104,056
Conservative Henry Paolucci[25] 212,216
Socialist Labor John Emanuel[26] 7,358
Socialist Workers Richard Garza[27] 4,202
For Total Votes, the Democratic and Liberal votes for Kennedy are combined.

North Dakota[edit]

North Dakota election

← 1960
1970 →
  Quentin Burdick.jpg Thomas Kleppe.jpg
Nominee Quentin Burdick Thomas Kleppe
Party Democratic-NPL Republican
Popular vote 149,264 109,681
Percentage 57.64% 42.36%

North Dakota Senate Election Results by County, 1964.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Blue denotes counties won by Burdick.
Red denotes those won by Kleppe.

U.S. senator before election

Quentin Burdick
Democratic-NPL

Elected U.S. senator

Quentin Burdick
Democratic-NPL

Incumbent Democratic-NPL Senator Quentin Burdick sought and received re-election to his second term, defeating Republican candidate Thomas S. Kleppe, who later became the United States Secretary of the Interior.[5]

Only Burdick filed as a Democratic-NPLer, and the endorsed Republican candidate was Thomas S. Kleppe, who would go on to serve two terms as a Representative for North Dakota's second congressional district from 1967 to 1971. Burdick and Kleppe won the primary elections for their respective parties.

1964 United States Senate election in North Dakota
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic-NPL Quentin Burdick (Incumbent) 149,264 57.64
Republican Thomas S. Kleppe 109,681 42.36
Turnout 219,560

Ohio[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Ohio[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stephen M. Young (Incumbent) 1,923,608 50.22
Republican Robert Taft Jr. 1,906,781 49.78
Majority 16,827 0.44
Turnout 3,830,389
Democratic hold

Oklahoma (Special)[edit]

1964 United States Senate special election in Oklahoma[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred R. Harris (Incumbent) 466,782 51.17
Republican Bud Wilkinson 445,392 48.83
Majority 21,390 3.34
Turnout 912,174
Democratic hold

Pennsylvania[edit]

Pennsylvania election

← 1958
1970 →
  SenHughScott.jpg No image.png
Nominee Hugh Scott Genevieve Blatt
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,429,858 2,359,223
Percentage 50.6% 49.1%

Pennsylvania Senatorial Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results

U.S. senator before election

Hugh Scott
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Hugh Scott
Republican

Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Hugh Scott successfully sought re-election to another term, defeating Democratic nominee Genevieve Blatt.

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Hugh Scott (Incumbent) 2,429,858 50.59 -0.62%
Democratic Genevieve Blatt,
Pennsylvania Secretary of Internal Affairs
2,359,223 49.12 +0.74%
Socialist Workers Morris Chertov 7,317 0.15 +0.01%
Socialist Labor George S. Taylor 6,881 0.14 -0.12%
N/A Other 473 0.00 N/A
Majority 70,635 1.47
Turnout 4,803,752
Republican hold Swing

Rhode Island[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Rhode Island[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Pastore (Incumbent) 319,607 82.73
Republican Ronald Legueux 66,715 17.27
Majority 252,892 65.45
Turnout 386,322
Democratic hold

Tennessee[edit]

Tennessee (regular)[edit]

Tennessee regular election

← 1958
1970 →
  Albert Gore Sr..jpg Dan Kuykendall.jpg
Nominee Albert Gore Sr. Dan Kuykendall
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 570,542 493,475
Percentage 53.62% 46.38%

Tennessee Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results
Gore:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Kuykendall:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. senator before election

Albert Gore Sr.
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Albert Gore Sr.
Democratic

Democrat Albert Gore Sr. was re-elected.

General election results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Albert Gore Sr. 570,542 53.62
Republican Dan Kuykendall 493,475 46.38
Majority 77,067 7.24
Turnout 1,064,017
Democratic hold

Tennessee (special)[edit]

Tennessee special election

← 1960 November 3, 1964 1966 →
  Ross Bass (1918-1993).jpg Howard Baker photo.jpg
Nominee Ross Bass Howard Baker
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 568,905 517,330
Percentage 52.14% 47.41%

Tennessee Senate Special Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results
Bass:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Baker:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

U.S. senator before election

Herbert S. Walters
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Ross Bass
Democratic

Democrat Ross Bass won the election, he defeated Republican Howard Baker.

General election results[29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ross Bass 568,905 52.14
Republican Howard Baker 517,330 47.41
Independent Melvin Babcock Morgan 4,853 0.44
Majority 51,575 4.73
Turnout 1,091,088
Democratic hold

Texas[edit]

Texas election

← 1958
1970 →
  RalphYarborough.jpg George HW Bush 90th congress.jpg
Nominee Ralph Yarborough George H. W. Bush
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,463,958 1,134,337
Percentage 56.2% 43.6%

U.S. senator before election

Ralph Yarborough
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Ralph Yarborough
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Ralph Yarborough defeated future President of the United States George H. W. Bush.

Although Yarborough won this election, he would lose the Democratic Primary six years later, in 1970, to Lloyd Bentsen. Bush later went on to win an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966; he was elected vice president of the United States in 1980 and was elected president in 1988.

1964 United States Senate election in Texas[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ralph W. Yarborough (Incumbent) 1,463,958 56.22
Republican George H. W. Bush 1,134,337 43.56
Constitution Jack Carswell 5,542 0.21
Majority 329,621 12.66
Turnout 2,603,837
Democratic hold

Utah[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Utah[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Moss (Incumbent) 227,822 57.33
Republican Ernest L. Wilkinson 169,562 42.67
Majority 58,260 14.66
Turnout 397,384
Democratic hold

Vermont[edit]

Vermont election

← 1958
1970 →
  WinstonProuty.jpg No image.png
Nominee Winston L. Prouty Frederick J. Fayette
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 87,879 76,457
Percentage 53.4% 46.5%

U.S. senator before election

Winston L. Prouty
Republican

Elected U.S. senator

Winston L. Prouty
Republican

Incumbent Republican Winston L. Prouty successfully ran for re-election, defeating Democratic candidate Frederick J. Fayette.

Republican primary results[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Winston L. Prouty (Incumbent) 43,648 99.9
Republican Other 63 0.1
Total votes '43,711' '100'
Democratic primary results[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Frederick J. Fayette 12,388 71.1
Democratic William H. Meyer 4,913 28.2
Democratic Other 134 0.7
Total votes '17,435' '100'
1964 United States Senate election in Vermont[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Winston L. Prouty 83,302 50.7
Independent Winston L. Prouty 4,516 2.7
N/A Winston L. Prouty 61 0.0
Total Winston L. Prouty (Incumbent) 87,879 53.4
Democratic Frederick J. Fayette 76,457 46.5
N/A Other 14 0.0
Majority 11,422 6.95
Total votes '164,350' '100.00%'
Republican hold Swing

Virginia[edit]

Virginia election

  Harry F. Byrd.jpg No image.svg No image.png
Nominee Harry F. Byrd Richard A. May James W. Respess
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Popular vote 592,270 176,624 95,526
Percentage 63.8% 19.0% 10.3%

U.S. senator before election

Harry F. Byrd
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Harry F. Byrd
Democratic

Incumbent Harry F. Byrd was re-elected to a sixth term, defeating Republican Richard A. May and independent James W. Respess.

1964 United States Senate election in Virginia[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Harry F. Byrd (Incumbent) 592,270 63.80 -5.52%
Republican Richard A. May 176,624 19.03 +19.03%
Independent James W. Respess 95,526 10.29
Independent J.B. Brayman 30,594 3.30
Independent Milton L. Green 12,110 1.30
Independent Robert E. Poole Jr. 10,774 1.16
Independent Willie T. Wright 10,424 1.12
Write-ins 51 0.01
Majority 415,646 44.77 +1.72%
Turnout 928,373
Democratic hold

Washington[edit]

Washington election

← 1958
1970 →
  HenryJackson.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Henry M. Jackson Lloyd J. Andrews
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 875,950 337,138
Percentage 71.21% 27.79%

U.S. senator before election

Henry M. Jackson
Democratic

Elected U.S. senator

Henry M. Jackson
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in Washington[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry M. Jackson (Incumbent) 875,950 72.21
Republican Lloyd J. Andrews 337,138 27.79
Majority 538,812 44.42
Turnout 1,213,088
Democratic hold

West Virginia[edit]

West Virginia election

← 1958
1970 →
  Robert C. Byrd – 1967.jpg Blank2x3.svg
Nominee Robert Byrd Cooper P. Benedict
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 515,015 246,072
Percentage 67.67% 32.33%

West Virginia Senate Election Results by County, 1964.svg
County results
Byrd:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Benedict:      50-60%      60-70%

U.S. senator before election

Robert Byrd
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Robert Byrd
Democratic

1964 United States Senate election in West Virginia[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Byrd (Incumbent) 515,015 67.67
Republican Cooper P. Benedict 246,072 32.33
Majority 268,943 34.33
Turnout 761,087
Democratic hold

Wisconsin[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Wisconsin[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Proxmire (Incumbent) 892,013 53.29
Republican Wilbur N. Renk 780,116 46.61
Independent Kenneth F. Klinkerk 1,062 0.06
Independent Wayne Leverenz 479 0.03
None Scattering 106 0.01
Majority 111,897 6.68
Turnout 1,673,776
Democratic hold

Wyoming[edit]

1964 United States Senate election in Wyoming[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gale McGee (Incumbent) 76,485 53.99
Republican John S. Wold 65,185 46.01
Majority 11,300 6.98
Turnout 141,670
Democratic hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party is affiliated nationally with the Democratic Party (United States).
  2. ^ Dean, John W. and Goldwater, Barry M. Jr. (2008). Pure Goldwater (1st ed.). New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan. p. 72. ISBN 978-0230611337. 1952 mcfarland goldwater.
  3. ^ "Our Campaigns - AZ US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 08, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  4. ^ "Our Campaigns - AZ US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1964" (PDF). Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  6. ^ "Our Campaigns - CT US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  7. ^ Howard J. Whitmore Jr. at ourcampaigns.com
  8. ^ Lawrence Gilfedder at ourcampaigns.com
  9. ^ Grace F. Luder at ourcampaigns.com
  10. ^ Race details at ourcampaigns.com
  11. ^ "Our Campaigns - MN US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 08, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  12. ^ https://www.leg.state.mn.us/archive/sessions/electionresults/1964-09-08-p-man.pdf
  13. ^ "Our Campaigns - MN US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1964". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  14. ^ a b "Report of the Official Canvass of the Vote Cast at the Primary Election Held in the State of Montana, June 2, 1964". Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved July 2, 2014.
  15. ^ "NM US Senate". OurCampaigns. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  16. ^ Senate Candidate Chosen in NYT on March 30, 1964 (subscription required)
  17. ^ KEATING CHOSEN BY REPUBLICANS IN SHOW OF UNITY; Fino and Other Dissidents Yield to Party Chiefs at State Convention Here in NYT on September 1, 1964 (subscription required)
  18. ^ PAOLUCCI NAMED BY CONSERVATIVES in NYT on September 1, 1964 (subscription required)
  19. ^ KENNEDY SWAMPS STRATTON TO WIN STATE NOMINATION; Democrats Name Attorney General, 968 to 153, at a Noisy Convention Here; NOMINEE ANSWERS FOES; He Says New York's First Senator Was an Able Man From Massachusetts; Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, a sudden new power in New York politics, won the Democratic nomination for Senator yesterday at one of the most boisterous state conventions ever held here. in NYT on September 2, 1964 (subscription required)
  20. ^ KENNEDY NAMED BY LIBERAL PARTY; Opposition to Candidacy Is Angry but Scattered; The Liberal party's state convention listened to some angry but scattered opposition last night and then enthusiastically nominated Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy for United States Senator. in NYT on September 2, 1964 (subscription required)
  21. ^ Socialist Workers' Petitions Names Negro for President in NYT on September 8, 1964 (subscription required)
  22. ^ Peter J. Crotty (ca. 1910-1992), lawyer, of Buffalo, President of the Buffalo City Council 1948-51, Peter J. Crotty, Democratic Force In Western New York, Dies at 82 in NYT on March 4, 1992
  23. ^ The Carpetbagger, 1964 in NYT on February 23, 1999
  24. ^ "Lessons for Mrs. Clinton from 1964 - June 15, 1999". www.cnn.com. Retrieved March 19, 2018.
  25. ^ Dr. Henry Paolucci (1921-1999), Professor of Comparative Literature and Ancient Greek and Roman History at Iona College, later Professor of Government and Politics at St. John's University, Henry Paolucci, 77, Scholar and a Leader in Conservative Party Obit in NYT on January 6, 1999
  26. ^ John Emanuel (b. ca. 1908 in Greece), "fur worker," ran also for Comptroller in 1954; and for Lieutenant Governor in 1958 and 1962
  27. ^ Richard Garza (b. ca. 1928 The Bronx), "restaurant worker and seaman," ran also for Mayor of New York in 1961; and for Governor in 1962
  28. ^ Cook, Rhodes (October 26, 2017). America Votes 32: 2015-2016, Election Returns by State. CQ Press. ISBN 9781506368993 – via Google Books.
  29. ^ Cook, Rhodes (October 26, 2017). America Votes 32: 2015-2016, Election Returns by State. CQ Press. ISBN 9781506368993. Retrieved February 14, 2019 – via Google Books.
  30. ^ a b "Primary Election Results" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015.
  31. ^ "General Election Results - U.S. Senator - 1914-2014" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015.

External links[edit]