1969 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

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1969 Alabama Crimson Tide football
Liberty Bowl, L 33–47 vs. Colorado
Conference Southeastern Conference
1969 record 6–5 (2–4 SEC)
Head coach Bear Bryant (12th year)
Captain Danny Ford
Captain Alvin Samples
Home stadium Denny Stadium
Legion Field
Seasons
← 1968
1970 →
1969 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#15 Tennessee $ 5 1 0     9 2 0
#10 LSU 4 1 0     9 1 0
#20 Auburn 5 2 0     8 3 0
#14 Florida 3 1 1     9 1 1
#8 Ole Miss 4 2 0     8 3 0
Georgia 2 3 1     5 5 1
Vanderbilt 2 3 0     4 6 0
Alabama 2 4 0     6 5 0
Kentucky 1 6 0     2 8 0
Mississippi State 0 5 0     3 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1969 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1969 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 75th overall and 36th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 12th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished season with six wins and five losses (6–5 overall, 2–4 in the SEC) and with a loss against Colorado in the Liberty Bowl.

Alabama opened the season ranked No. 13 and defeated VPI at Blacksburg and Southern Miss in the first regular season game played at Denny Stadium on AstroTurf. In their third game, the Crimson Tide defeated an Archie Manning led Ole Miss squad 33–32 in a record-breaking game before a nationally televised audience. Alabama then lost consecutive game for the first time during Bryant's tenure as head coach against Vanderbilt and Tennessee.

After their loss to Tennessee, Alabama rebounded with victories at Clemson and at Mississippi State before they lost their third game of the season at LSU. They rebounded the next week with a homecoming victory over Miami but then lost to Auburn in the Iron Bowl. In the December that followed, Alabama lost 47–33 to Colorado in the Liberty Bowl.

The 1969 season marked the 100th anniversary of the start of college football, and as such Alabama commemorated the event by altering their helmet design. Instead of the player number, the helmet for the 1969 season featured the number "100" inside a football to commemorate the anniversary of the first college football game.[1]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 20 at VPI* No. 13 Lane StadiumBlacksburg, VA W 17–13   42,000
September 27 Southern Miss* No. 15 Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL W 63–14   50,035
October 4 No. 20 Ole Miss No. 15 Legion FieldBirmingham, AL (Rivalry) ABC W 33–32   62,858
October 11 at Vanderbilt No. 13 Dudley FieldNashville, TN L 10–14   34,000
October 18 No. 7 Tennessee No. 20 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Third Saturday in October) L 14–41   72,443
October 25 at Clemson* Memorial StadiumClemson, SC W 38–13   43,000
November 2 at Mississippi State Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, MS (Rivalry) W 23–19   36,517
November 8 at No. 12 LSU Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, LA (Rivalry) L 15–20   67,590
November 15 Miami*dagger Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL W 42–6   57,596
November 29 vs. No. 12 Auburn Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Iron Bowl) L 26–49   72,303
December 13 vs. Colorado* Memphis Memorial StadiumMemphis, TN (Liberty Bowl) ABC L 33–47   50,042
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1969 Alabama football schedule[2]

Game summaries[edit]

VPI[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#13 Alabama 3 7 7 0 17
VPI 3 7 0 3 13
  • Date: September 20
  • Location: Lane Stadium
    Blacksburg, VA
  • Game attendance: 42,000

To open the 1968 season, Alabama defeated the Virginia Tech (also then known as VPI) Gobblers 17–13 at Lane Stadium in a back-and-forth game between the teams.[3][4][5] After VPI took an early 3–0 lead on a 19-yard Jack Simcsak field goal, Alabama responded later in the first with a 40-yard Richard Ciemny field goal that tied the game 3–3.[3][4] Alabama then took a 10–3 lead on a one-yard Johnny Musso touchdown run in the second quarter. The Hokies were then able to tie the game 10–10 at halftime with a five-yard Al Kincaid touchdown run.[3][4]

In the third quarter, George Ranager scored what was the game-winning touchdown on a 10-yard run and a 45-yard Simcsak field goal in the fourth provided for the final margin in the 17–13 Crimson Tide victory.[3][4] The 42,000 in attendance was the largest crowd to date to witness a football game in the state of Virginia and required the addition of 7,000 temporary seats to accommodate demand.[4] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Virginia Tech to 5–0.[6]

Southern Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Southern Miss 0 7 7 0 14
#15 Alabama 9 26 14 14 63
  • Date: September 27
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 50,035

After their close victory over Virginia Tech, Alabama dropped into the No. 15 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against Southern Miss.[9] In their home opener, Alabama defeated the Golden Eagles 63–14 behind a ten-point rally in the fourth quarter.[5][7][8] Alabama took a 9–0 first quarter lead on a five-yard Scott Hunter touchdown pass to Pete Jilleba and a 25-yard Richard Ciemny field goal.[7][8] After Frank Johnston cut the Crimson Tide lead to 9–7 with his one-yard touchdown run, Alabama scored 26 second quarter points that extended their lead to 35–7 at halftime.[7][8] The four second-quarter touchdowns were scored on runs of 11-yards by George Ranager, one-yard by Hunter, six-yards by Johnny Musso and nine-yards by Bubba Sawyer.[7][8]

Alabama opened the third quarter with a two-yard Musso touchdown run, and then Southern scored their other touchdown on a six-yard Danny Palmer pass to Billy Mikel that made the score 42–14.[7][8] The Crimson Tide then closed the game with a pair of Neb Hayden touchdown runs from one and four-yards and by Benny Rippetoe on a four-yard run that made the final score 63–14.[7][8] The game was the first played on an AstroTurf surface between Denny Field opponents as it was installed during the previous spring.[10] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Southern Miss to 11–2–1.[11]

Ole Miss[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#20 Ole Miss 7 0 13 12 32
#15 Alabama 7 7 7 12 33
  • Date: October 4
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 62,858
  • TV announcers (ABC): Chris Schenkel (play-by-play), Bud Wilkinson (color)

After their blowout victory over Southern Miss, Alabama retained their No. 15 position in the AP Poll prior to their game at Ole Miss.[14] Before a nationally televised, prime time audience, Alabama defeated the Rebels 33–32 in an offensive shootout that saw the offenses combined to set one NCAA and nine SEC records.[5][12][13] After the teams traded first-quarter touchdown runs of one-yard by Johnny Musso and two-yards by Archie Manning, Alabama took a 14–7 halftime lead on a 17-yard Bubba Sawyer touchdown run.[12][13]

At the end of the third quarter, Alabama retained a 21–20 lead after the teams again traded touchdowns. The Rebels scored first on an 11-yard Manning pass to Floyd Franks, followed by a one-yard Musso run and a 17-yard Manning run.[12][13] Both teams then traded fourth-quarter touchdowns with the Crimson Tide coming out on top 33–32. Ole Miss touchdowns were scored on a two-yard Manning pass to Riley Myers and a one-yard Manning run, and Alabama touchdowns were scored on a one-yard Scott Hunter run and 14-yard Hunter pass to George Ranager.[12][13]

Records set in this game included a new national record for passes completed between both teams with 55.[15] Conference records set in the game by Rebels quarterback Archie Manning included most passing yards, attempts and completions in a single game by going 33 of 52 for 436 yards in addition to most total offense by a single player with 540 yards.[15] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Ole Miss to 21–4–2.[16]

Vanderbilt[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
#13 Alabama 3 0 7 0 10
Vanderbilt 0 7 0 7 14
  • Date: October 11
  • Location: Dudley Field
    Nashville, TN
  • Game attendance: 34,000

After their victory over the Rebels, Alabama moved into the No. 13 position of the AP Poll prior to their game against Vanderbilt.[19] At Nashville the Commodores upset Alabama 14–10 and ended a nine-game losing streak against the Crimson Tide.[5][17][18] After Alabama took a 3–0 first quarter lead on a 19-yard Mike Dean field goal, Vanderbilt responded in the second quarter with a six-yard William Mathews touchdown pass to David Strong that gave them the halftime lead 7–3.[17][18] The Crimson Tide retook the lead with a 19-yard George Ranager touchdown run, but the Commodores then scored the game-winning touchdown on a 10-yard Lester Brown pass to James Cunningham that made the final score 14–10.[17][18] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Vanderbilt to 26–17–4.[20]

Tennessee[edit]

Third Saturday in October
1 2 3 4 Total
#7 Tennessee 21 3 3 14 41
#20 Alabama 0 0 0 14 14
  • Date: October 18
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 72,443

After their loss at Vanderbilt, Alabama dropped from the No. 13 to No. 20 position of the AP Poll prior to their game against Tennessee.[23] Against Tennessee, the Volunteers took a 34–0 lead into the fourth quarter en route to a 41–14 victory at Legion Field.[5][21][22] Tennessee took a commanding 21–0 first quarter lead with three touchdowns. The first was scored on a five-yard Bobby Scott pass to Gary Kreis, the second on a 71-yard Bobby Majors punt return and the third on a 27-yard Jackie Walker fumble return.[21][22] George Hunt made the halftime score 24–0 with his 22-yard field goal in the second and extended it to 27–0 with his 31-yard field goal in the third.[21][22]

After Scott brought the Volunteers' lead to 34–0 with his two-yard touchdown run in the fourth, Alabama scored their first points on a one-yard Johnny Musso run.[21][22] The game then closed with a six-yard Richard Callaway run for Tennessee and a six-yard Musso run for a touchdown that made the final score 41–14.[21][22] The loss was the first time Coach Bryant lost three consecutive games to the same opponent as Alabama's head coach.[22] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Tennessee to 23–22–7.[24]

Clemson[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 14 14 0 10 38
Clemson 0 7 0 6 13
  • Date: October 25
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Clemson, SC
  • Game attendance: 43,000

After their blowout loss at home against Tennessee, Alabama dropped from the No. 20 position out of the AP Poll altogether prior to their game at Clemson.[27] At Memorial Stadium, the Crimson Tide ended their two-game losing steak with this 38–13 win over the Tigers of the Atlantic Coast Conference.[5][25][26] Alabama managed to take a 28–0 lead late into the second quarter before Clemson scored their first points of the game. The Crimson Tide scored first-quarter touchdowns on runs of 36-yards by George Ranager and nine-yards by Johnny Musso, and they scored second-quarter touchdowns on receptions of 40-yards by Ranager from Neb Hayden and 20-yards by Bubba Sawyer from Scott Hunter.[25][26] Clemson then made the halftime score 28–7 after John McMakin caught a five-yard touchdown pass from Tommy Kendrick.[25][26]

After a scoreless third quarter, the Crimson Tide extended their lead to 38–7 on a one-yard Musso touchdown run and a 39-yard Oran Buck field goal.[25][26] The Tigers then closed the game with a two-yard Ray Yauger touchdown run that made the final score 38–13.[25][26] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Clemson to 10–3.[28]

Mississippi State[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 10 0 0 13 23
Mississippi State 7 0 0 12 19
  • Date: November 2
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Jackson, MS
  • Game attendance: 36,517

At Jackson, Alabama defeated the Mississippi State Bulldogs 23–19 in Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium.[5][29][30] After Richard Ciemny gave the Crimson Tide an early 3–0 lead with his 30-yard field goal, Don Dudley gave State a 7–3 lead with his 16-yard touchdown run.[30] Pete Jilleba then scored for Alabama on a three-yard run that made the score 10–7 in favor of the Crimson Tide that held through the fourth after scoreless second and third quarters.[29][30]

In the fourth, both teams traded a pair of touchdowns with Alabama eventually winning the game 23–19. Crimson Tide touchdowns were scored on Johnny Musso runs of four and 25-yards and State touchdowns were scored on a six-yard Tommy Pharr run and a two-yard Pharr pass to Bob Young.[29][30] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Mississippi State to 41–10–3.[31]

LSU[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 3 0 12 15
#12 LSU 0 3 10 7 20
  • Date: November 8
  • Location: Tiger Stadium
    Baton Rouge, LA
  • Game attendance: 67,590

Playing at night before a sold-out Tiger Stadium, Alabama was defeated by the LSU Tigers 20–15.[5][32][33] After a scoreless first quarter, field goals of 30-yards by Mark Lumpkin for LSU and 26-yards by Oran Buck for Alabama made the halftime score 3–3.[32][33] LSU then took a 13–3 lead in the third quarter after a one-yard Allen Shorey touchdown run and a 25-yard Lumpkin field goal.[32][33]

In the fourth, the teams traded touchdowns with the Tigers' ultimately winning 20–15. Fourth-quarter touchdowns were scored by LSU on a second one-yard Shorey run and by Alabama on Scott Hunter passes of 37-yards to Hunter Husband and 34-yards to David Bailey.[32][33] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 20–9–4.[34]

Miami[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
Miami 0 0 6 0 6
Alabama 7 21 7 7 42
  • Date: November 15
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 57,596

On homecoming in Tuscaloosa, Alabama defeated the Miami Hurricanes 42–6 and with their sixth victory of the season became bowl eligible.[5][35][36] The Crimson Tide took a 7–0 lead in the first on a two-yard Scott Hunter touchdown run before they scored three in the second quarter.[35][36] Alabama led 28–0 at halftime after a one-yard Johnny Musso touchdown run and Neb Hayden touchdown passes of 21-yards to Musso and 16-yards to George Ranager.[35][36]

After Miami scored their only points of the game early in the third on an eight-yard Kelly Cochrane touchdown pass to Joe Schmidt that made the score 28–6.[35][36] Alabama then closed the game with a three-yard Phil Chaffin touchdown run in the third and on an 18-yard Stephen Doran touchdown reception from Benny Rippetoe in the fourth that made the final score 42–6.[35][36] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Miami to 7–2.[37]

Auburn[edit]

Iron Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
#12 Auburn 0 14 14 21 49
Alabama 3 7 7 9 26
  • Date: November 29
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 72,303

In their final regular season game, Alabama was defeated by the Auburn Tigers in the annual Iron Bowl game 49–26 at Legion Field.[5][38][39] After Alabama took a 3–0 lead on a 32-yard Oran Buck field goal in the first quarter, Auburn went on to outscore the Crimson Tide 49 to 23 over the final three quarters of the game.[38][39] In the second, Wallace Clark scored a pair of touchdowns on runs of one and three-yards for the Tigers and Hunter Husband scored for Alabama on a four-yard run that made the halftime score 14–10.[38][39]

In the third quarter, Auburn extended their lead to 28–10 on touchdown runs of four-yards by Pat Sullivan and one-yard by Mickey Zofko before George Ranager had a 100-yard kickoff return that made the score 28–17 as they entered the fourth quarter.[38][39] After Buck connected on a 27-yard field goal early in the fourth for Alabama, Auburn scored three consecutive touchdowns that extended their lead to 49–20. These were scored by Zofko on a nine-yard run, by Clark on a three-yard run and by Connie Frederick on an 84-yard run.[38][39] The Crimson Tide closed the game with a seven-yard Scott Hunter touchdown pass to David Bailey that made the final score 49–26.[38][39] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Auburn to 18–15–1.[40]

Colorado[edit]

Liberty Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 19 14 0 33
Colorado 10 21 0 16 47
  • Date: December 13
  • Location: Memphis Memorial Stadium
    Memphis, TN
  • Game attendance: 50,144

On November 17, Alabama accepted an invitation to play in the Liberty Bowl against an unnamed opponent at the time of its announcement.[43] The next week, Colorado of the Big Eight Conference defeated Kansas State in their regular season finale and accepted an invitation to play the Crimson Tide at the Liberty Bowl.[44] Against the Buffaloes, Alabama lost 47–33 and completed the first five loss season during Bryant's tenure as head coach in the first all-time meeting between the schools.[41][42][45]

The Buffaloes took a 10–0 first quarter lead on a 13-yard Ward Walsh touchdown run and 30-yard Dave Haney field goal.[41][42] After they extended their lead further to 17–0 on a three-yard Bobby Anderson touchdown run early in the second, Alabama responded with a pair of touchdown runs that cut the Colorado lead to 17–13. The first was on a 31-yard Scott Hunter run and the second on a six-yard George Ranager run.[41][42] The teams then traded two more touchdowns on runs of 15-yards by Walsh for Colorado and two-yards by Johnny Musso before Steve Engel had 91-yard kickoff return that made the halftime score 31–19.[41][42]

The Crimson Tide then rallied and took a 33–31 lead in the third quarter on a pair of Neb Hayden touchdown throws. The first was to Griff Langston from 51-yards and the second to Musso from ten-yards.[41][42] Colorado then responded with a pair of unanswered touchdowns and a safety in the fourth quarter and won the game 47–33. Touchdowns were scored on Anderson runs of two and three-yards with a combined quarterback sack of Hayden for a safety by Bill Brundige and Herb Orvis providing the final margin.[41][42]

NFL Draft[edit]

Several players that were varsity lettermen from the 1969 squad were drafted into the National Football League (NFL) in the 1971 and 1972 drafts. These players included the following:

Year Round Overall Player name Position NFL team
1971 NFL Draft
[46]
6 140 Hunter, ScottScott Hunter Quarterback Green Bay Packers
1972 NFL Draft
[46]
3 62 Musso, JohnnyJohnny Musso Running back Chicago Bears
11 266 Bailey, DavidDavid Bailey Wide receiver Green Bay Packers
15 386 Parkhouse, RobinRobin Parkhouse Linebacker Baltimore Colts
16 411 Higginbottom, SteveSteve Higginbottom Defensive back Washington Redskins

Freshman squad[edit]

Prior to the 1972 college football season, NCAA rules prohibited freshmen from participating on the varsity team, and as such many schools fielded freshmen teams.[47][48] The Alabama freshmen squad was led by coach Clem Gryska for the 1969 season and finished with a record of three wins and two losses (3–2).[49] The Baby Tide opened their season with a 13–7 loss against Mississippi State at Scott Field.[50] After Alabama took a 7–0 lead on a one-yard Steve Wade run in the second, Billy Baker threw for both of the State touchdowns. The first was from 39-yards to Emil Petro in the third and the second was from 56-yards to Lewis Grubbs in the fourth for the 13–7 victory.[50] In their second game, the Alabama freshmen defeated Vanderbilt 12–8 at Denny Stadium.[51] After a scoreless first, Butch Hobson gave Alabama a 7–0 halftime lead with his short touchdown run, and a pair of Randy Moore field goals in the second half accounted for the 12 Crimson points.[51] The Commodores scored their only touchdown in the fourth quarter on a 44-yard Pete Power touchdown pass to Cliff Flemore.[51]

In their third game, the Alabama freshmen defeated Ole Miss 13–6 at Denny Stadium.[52] After a 30-yard Randy Moore field goal gave Alabama a 3–0 first quarter lead, Johnny Sharpless scored on an eight-yard touchdown run in the second for a 10–0 halftime lead.[52] Moore connected on a 33-yard field goal in the third and then Ole Miss scored their only points in the final minute of the game on a one-yard Norris Weese touchdown run.[52] After a 35–0 victory at Tennessee, the Baby Tide closed the season with a 17–9 loss to Auburn at Cliff Hare Stadium[49]

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "Crimson Tide uniforms changing through the years". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "1969 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Fumble held key to Alabama's win". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. Google News Archives. Associated Press. September 21, 1969. p. B5. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Land, Charles (September 21, 1969). "Hunter passes Tide over VPI, 17–13". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 11. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j 1969 Season Recap
  6. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Virginia Tech". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Mayne, Bob (September 28, 1969). "Big bad Alabama chews up hapless Southern, 63–14". The Gadsden Times. Google News Archives. p. 25. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Land, Charles (September 28, 1969). "Tiders breeze to win, 63–14". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  9. ^ Moran, Sheila (September 23, 1969). "Gators up, Cougars out in grid poll". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. Associated Press. p. 6. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ Land, Charles (July 14, 1968). "The age of AstroTurf". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 11. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  11. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Southern Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (October 5, 1969). "Tide's Hunter has last say". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 13. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d e Maisel, Ivan (October 14, 2011). "Ole Miss–Alabama game still legendary". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Top seven keep positions". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. Associated Press. September 30, 1968. p. 10. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Tide–Reb battle one for records". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. October 6, 1969. p. 9. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  16. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (October 12, 1969). "Tide falls to Vandy". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b c d "Brown tosses winning TD against lifeless Alabama". The Gadsden Times. Google News Archives. Associated Press. October 12, 1969. p. 25. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  19. ^ Olan, Ben (October 7, 1969). "Longhorns climb to second place". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. Associated Press. p. 10. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  20. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Vanderbilt". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f Land, Charles (October 19, 1969). "Tennessee tramples Bama, 41–14". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g "Tennessee scores couple of firsts in thrashing Alabama 41–14". The Middlesboro Daily News. Google News Archives. October 20, 1969. p. 2. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  23. ^ Olan, Ben (October 14, 1969). "LSU, Florida reach top 10". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. Associated Press. p. 8. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  24. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Tennessee". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f Land, Charles (October 26, 1969). "Tide rebounds in 38–13 win". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f Timms, Leslie (October 26, 1969). "Alabama downs Clemson". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. Google News Archives. p. B1. Retrieved October 26, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Tennessee vaults into third place". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. Associated Press. October 21, 1969. p. 6. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  28. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Clemson". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  29. ^ a b c d Land, Charles (November 2, 1969). "Crimson Tide tops State State, 23–19". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  30. ^ a b c d e "Bama nips State 23–19". The Florence Times. Google News Archives. Associated Press. November 2, 1969. p. 8. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  31. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  32. ^ a b c d e Land, Charles (November 9, 1969). "LSU Tigers edge Tide". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  33. ^ a b c d e Shearer, Ed (November 9, 1969). "LSU nips Tide". The Florence Times. Google News Archives. Associated Press. p. 9. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  34. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Louisiana State". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on October 14, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  35. ^ a b c d e f Land, Charles (November 16, 1969). "Tide routs Miami, clinches bowl bid". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 13. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  36. ^ a b c d e f "Alabama stampedes Miami". Ocala Star-Banner. Google News Archives. Associated Press. November 16, 1969. p. 2D. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  37. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Miami (FL)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b c d e f g Land, Charles (November 30, 1969). "Auburn beats Bama 49–26". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  39. ^ a b c d e f g "Auburn trounces Alabama by 49–26". The News and Courier. Google News Archives. Associated Press. November 30, 1969. p. 4B. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  40. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Auburn". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on June 22, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  41. ^ a b c d e f g Land, Charles (December 14, 1969). "Buffaloes rumble past Tide, 47–33". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  42. ^ a b c d e f g "Anderson, Colorado bomb Bama". Palm Beach Post-Times. Associated Press. December 14, 1969. p. D1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  43. ^ Land, Charles (November 17, 1969). "Crimson Tide, Auburn to play in bowl games". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 1. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Colorado to face Tide in Liberty". The Florence Times. UPI. November 23, 1969. p. 13. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  45. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Colorado". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  46. ^ a b "Draft History by School–Alabama". National Football League. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  47. ^ Kersey, Jason (August 27, 2012). "NCAA's decision to allow freshman eligibility changed football landscape". The Oklahoman. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  48. ^ Reed, Delbert (January 21, 1972). "Unanimous vote makes SEC frosh eligible". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 6. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  49. ^ a b Stewart, Mike (November 23, 1969). "Tiger frosh hand Bama 17–9 defeat". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 13. Retrieved October 13, 2013. 
  50. ^ a b Land, Charles (October 4, 1969). "State touchdown passes put Baby Tide down, 13–7". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 5. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  51. ^ a b c Land, Charles (October 18, 1969). "No high scores for frosh, but record is even now". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 4. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  52. ^ a b c Land, Charles (October 25, 1969). "Sharpless, Moore spark Baby Tide win". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 4. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  53. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 187–201
  54. ^ 2012 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book, pp. 202–203