1969 Big Ten Conference football season

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1969 Big Ten Conference football season
Sport American football
Number of teams 10
Top draft pick Mike Phipps
Co-champions Michigan
Ohio State
Runners-up Purdue
Season MVP Mike Phipps
Seasons
← 1968
1970 →
1969 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#4 Ohio State + 6 1 0     8 1 0
#9 Michigan + 6 1 0     8 3 0
#18 Purdue 5 2 0     8 2 0
Minnesota 4 3 0     4 5 1
Iowa 3 4 0     5 5 0
Indiana 3 4 0     4 6 0
Northwestern 3 4 0     3 7 0
Wisconsin 3 4 0     3 7 0
Michigan State 2 5 0     4 6 0
Illinois 0 7 0     0 10 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1969 Big Ten Conference football season was the 74th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1969 college football season.

The 1969 Michigan Wolverines football team, in the program's first year under head coach Bo Schembechler, was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. The 1969 Michigan vs. Ohio State football game was considered one of the biggest upsets in college football history, as Ohio State came into the game with an 8–0 record, a 22-game winning streak and the No. 1 ranking in the polls. Michigan defeated Ohio State, 24–12, to win the Big Ten's berth in the 1970 Rose Bowl, where they lost to USC. Michigan tight end Jim Mandich and defensive back Tom Curtis were consensus first-team All-Americans. Mandich was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1969 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, was ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll every week until losing to Michigan in the final game of the regular season. After the loss to Michigan, the Buckeyes dropped to No. 4 in the final AP Poll. Defensive back Jack Tatum, running back Jim Otis, and middle guard Jim Stillwagon were consensus first-team All-Americans. Otis was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1969 Purdue Boilermakers football team, in its final season under head coach Jack Mollenkopf, compiled an 8–2 record and was ranked No. 18 in the final polls. Quarterback Mike Phipps totaled 2,527 passing yards, won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the conference's most valuable player, was selected as the consensus first-team All-American quarterback, received the Sammy Baugh Trophy as the nation's top collegiate passer, and finished second in the voting for the 1969 Heisman Trophy.

Season overview[edit]

Results and team statistics[edit]

Conf. Rank Team Head coach AP final AP high Overall record Conf. record PPG PAG MVP
1 (tie) Ohio State Woody Hayes #4 #1 8–1 6–1 42.6 10.3 Jim Otis
1 (tie) Michigan Bo Schembechler #9 #7 8–3 6–1 32.0 13.5 Jim Mandich
3 Purdue Jack Mollenkopf #18 #8 8–2 5–2 35.4 26.4 Mike Phipps
4 Minnesota Murray Warmath NR #19 4–5–1 4–3 21.0 26.0 Ray Parson
5 (tie) Iowa Ray Nagel NR NR 5–5 3–4 25.5 27.5 Larry Ely
5 (tie) Indiana John Pont NR #10 4–6 3–4 25.2 24.2 John Isenbarger
5 (tie) Northwestern Alex Agase NR NR 3-7 3-4 13.7 30.6 Don Ross
5 (tie) Wisconsin John Coatta NR NR 3–7 3–4 19.6 34.9 Stu Voigt
9 Michigan State Duffy Daugherty NR #12 4–6 2–5 20.2 23.1 Ron Saul
10 Illinois Jim Valek NR NR 0–10 0–7 10.6 39.7 Doug Dieken

Key
AP final = Team's rank in the final AP Poll of the 1969 season
AP high = Team's highest rank in the AP Poll throughout the 1969 season
PPG = Average of points scored per game; conference leader's average displayed in bold
PAG = Average of points allowed per game; conference leader's average displayed in bold
MVP = Most valuable player as voted by players on each team as part of the voting process to determine the winner of the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy; trophy winner in bold[1]

Preseason[edit]

On December 24, 1968, the University of Michigan announced that head football coach Bump Elliott would assume a new job as associate athletic director and that a new football coach was being sought.[2] Two days later, the university announced that Bo Schembechler had been hired as Elliott's replacement.[3]

Regular season[edit]

September 20[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 20 #19 Minnesota Arizona State Sun Devil StadiumTempe, AZ L 26–48  
September 20 #14 Indiana Kentucky Commonwealth StadiumLexington, KY W 58–30  
September 20 Vanderbilt Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 42–14  
September 20 Washington #12 Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI W 27–11  
September 20 Northwestern #11 Notre Dame Notre Dame StadiumSouth Bend, IN (Northwestern–Notre Dame football rivalry) L 10–35  
September 20 #6 Oklahoma Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI L 21–48  
September 20 Oregon State Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA L 14–42  
September 20 #18 Purdue TCU Amon G. Carter StadiumFort Worth, TX W 42–35  
September 20 Washington State Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL L 18–19  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

September 27[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
September 27 California #10 Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN L 14–17  
September 27 Washington State Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA W 61–35  
September 27 Washington #20 Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 45–7  
September 27 SMU #13 Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI W 23–15  
September 27 Illinois #11 Missouri St. Louis, MO (Illinois-Missouri football rivalry) L 6–37  
September 27 Minnesota Ohio Athens, OH T 35–35  
September 27 TCU #1 Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH W 62–0  
September 27 #9 Notre Dame #16 Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN (Shillelagh Trophy) W 28–14  
September 27 Northwestern #5 USC Los Angeles Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA L 6–48  
September 27 #14 UCLA Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI L 23–34  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

October 4[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 4 Colorado Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN L 7–30  
October 4 Arizona Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA W 31–19  
October 4 Iowa State Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL L 20–48  
October 4 #9 Missouri #13 Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI L 17–40  
October 4 Nebraska Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN L 14–42  
October 4 #14 Michigan State Notre Dame Notre Dame StadiumSouth Bend, IN (Megaphone Trophy) L 28–42  
October 4 #1 Ohio State Washington Husky StadiumSeattle, WA W 41–14  
October 4 #17 Stanford #8 Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN W 36–35  
October 4 Syracuse Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI L 7–43  
October 4 #11 UCLA Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL L 0–36  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

October 11[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 11 Minnesota Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN  IND 17–7  
October 11 #9 Purdue Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI  MICH 31–20  
October 11 Northwestern Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL (Sweet Sioux Tomahawk)  NW 10–6  
October 11 #19 Michigan State #1 Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH  OHST 54–21  
October 11 Iowa Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI (Iowa–Wisconsin football rivalry)  WIS 23–17  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

October 18[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 18 Illinois Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN  IND 41–20  
October 18 #13 Michigan Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI (Paul Bunyan Trophy)  MSU 23–12  
October 18 Wisconsin Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL  NW 27–7  
October 18 #1 Ohio State Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN  OHST 34–7  
October 18 Iowa #17 Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN  PUR 35–31  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

October 25[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
October 25 Michigan State Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA  IOWA 19–18  
October 25 Michigan Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN (Little Brown Jug)  MICH 35–9  
October 25 Illinois #1 Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH (Illibuck)  OHST 41–0  
October 25 Northwestern #15 Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN  PUR 45–20  
October 25 Indiana Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI  WIS 36–34  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

November 1[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 1 Indiana Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI (Old Brass Spittoon)  IND 16–0  
November 1 Wisconsin #20 Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI  MICH 35–7  
November 1 Minnesota Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA (Floyd of Rosedale)  MINN 35–8  
November 1 #1 Ohio State Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL  OHST 35–6  
November 1 #13 Purdue Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL (Purdue Cannon)  PUR 49–22  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

November 7[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 7 Iowa Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN  IOWA 28–17  
November 7 #18 Michigan Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL  MICH 57–0  
November 7 Northwestern Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN  MINN 28–21  
November 7 Wisconsin #1 Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH  OHST 62–7  
November 7 Michigan State #10 Purdue Ross-Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN  PUR 41–13  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

November 15[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 15 #14 Michigan Iowa Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA  MICH 51–6  
November 15 Minnesota Michigan State Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI  MINN 14–10  
November 15 Indiana Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL  NW 30–27  
November 15 #10 Purdue #1 Ohio State Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH  OHST 42–14  
November 15 Illinois Wisconsin Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI  WIS 55–14  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

November 22[edit]

Date Time Visiting team Home team Site TV Result Attendance
November 22 Iowa Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL  IOWA 40–0  
November 22 #1 Ohio State #12 Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI (The Game) ABC  MICH 24–12  
November 22 Michigan State Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL  MSU 39–7  
November 22 Wisconsin Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN (Paul Bunyan's Axe)  MINN 35–10  
November 22 #17 Purdue Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN (Old Oaken Bucket)  PUR 44–21  
#Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Standard Time.

[4]

Bowl games[edit]

On January 1, 1970, Michigan lost to USC, 10–3, at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The score was tied, 3–3, at halftime. With three minutes to play in the third quarter, USC quarterback Jimmy Jones threw a 33-yard touchdown pass to Bob Chandler to give the Trojans the 10–3 victory. Michigan head coach Bo Schembechler suffered a heart attack the night before the game and was in the hospital during the game. Defensive coordinator Jim Young assumed the coaching responsibilities for the game.

Statistical leaders[edit]

The Big Ten's individual statistical leaders include the following:

Passing yards[edit]

1. Mike Phipps, Purdue (2,527)
2. Larry Lawrence, Iowa (1,680)
3. Harry Gonso, Indiana (1,336)
4. Maurie Daigneau, Northwestern (1,276)
5. Phil Hagen, Minnesota (1,266)

Rushing yards[edit]

1. John Isenbarger, Indiana (1,217)
2. Jim Otis, Ohio State (1,027)
3. Don Highsmith, Michigan State (937)
4. Alan Thompson, Wisconsin (907)
5. Billy Taylor, Michigan (864)

Receiving yards[edit]

1. Kerry Reardon, Iowa (738)
2. Stan Brown, Purdue (725)
3. Ashley Bell, Purdue (669)
4. Jim Mandich, Michigan (662)
5. Jade Butcher, Indiana (552)

Total yards[edit]

1. Mike Phipps, Purdue (2,745)
2. Larry Lawrence, Iowa (2,086)
3. Don Moorhead, Michigan (1,886)
4. Rex Kern, Ohio State (1,585)
5. Harry Gonso, Indiana (1,573)

Point scored[edit]

1. Jim Otis, Ohio State (96)
1. Stan Brown, Purdue (96)
3. Garvie Craw, Michigan (78)
4. Ashley Bell, Purdue (66)
5. Jade Butcher, Indiana (60)

Awards and honors[edit]

All-Big Ten honors[edit]

The following players were picked by the Associated Press (AP) and/or the United Press International (UPI) as first-team players on the 1969 All-Big Ten Conference football team.[5][6]

Offense

Position Name Team Selectors
Quarterback Mike Phipps Purdue AP, UPI
Running back John Isenbarger Indiana AP, UPI
Running back Jim Otis Ohio State AP, UPI
Running back Mike Adamle Northwestern AP
Running back Billy Taylor Michigan UPI
End Jim Mandich Michigan AP, UPI
End Ray Parson Minnesota AP
End Jade Butcher Indiana UPI
Tackle Dan Dierdorf Michigan AP, UPI
Tackle Paul DeNuccio Purdue AP
Tackle Charles Hutchison Ohio State UPI
Guard Ron Saul Michigan State AP, UPI
Guard Don DeSalle Indiana AP
Guard Jon Meskimen Iowa UPI
Center Brian Donovan Ohio State AP
Center Guy Murdock Michigan UPI

Defense

Position Name Team Selectors
Defensive end Dave Whitfield Ohio State AP, UPI
Defensive end Mark Debeve Ohio State AP
Defensive end Rich Saul Michigan State UPI
Defensive tackle Paul Schmidlin Ohio State AP, UPI
Defensive tackle Ron Curl Michigan State AP
Defensive tackle Bill Yanchar Purdue UPI
Middle guard Jim Stillwagon Ohio State AP, UPI
Linebacker Veno Paraskevas Purdue AP, UPI
Linebacker Jack Tatum Ohio State AP, UPI [def. back]
Linebacker Marty Huff Michigan AP
Linebacker Doug Adams Ohio State UPI
Defensive back Tom Curtis Michigan AP, UPI
Defensive back Ted Provost Ohio State AP, UPI
Defensive back Mike Sensibaugh Ohio State AP, UPI

All-American honors[edit]

At the end of the 1969 season, Big Ten players secured six of the consensus first-team picks for the 1969 College Football All-America Team.[7] The Big Ten's consensus All-American was:

Position Name Team Selectors
Defensive back Jack Tatum Ohio State AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA [cornerback], UPI, FN, TSN, WCFF
Tight end Jim Mandich Michigan AFCA [end], AP, CP [end], FWAA, NEA, UPI [end], FN, Time, WCFF
Quarterback Mike Phipps Purdue AFCA, AP, CP, FWAA, NEA, UPI, FN, Time, TSN, WCFF
Running back Jim Otis Ohio State AP [fullback], CP [fullback], FWAA, UPI, FN, WCFF
Middle guard Jim Stillwagon Ohio State AFCA, AP, CP, NEA, UPI, FN, WCFF
Defensive back Tom Curtis Michigan AP, CP, UPI, FN, WCFF

Other Big Ten players who were named first-team All-Americans by at least one selector were:

Position Name Team Selectors
Offensive guard Ron Saul Michigan State CP, NEA, Time, TSN
Offensive guard Chuck Hutchison Ohio State Time
Running back Rex Kern Ohio State CP, FN
Running back John Isenbarger Indiana FN
Defensive back Ted Provost Ohio State Time, TSN
Defensive back Tim Foley Purdue Time

Other awards[edit]

Purdue quarterback Mike Phipps received the Sammy Baugh Trophy as the nation's top collegiate passer. He also finished second in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Phipps Named Big Ten's Most Valuable: Purdue's Quarterback Wins Silver Football". Chicago Tribune. December 25, 1969. p. 3-1, 3-4. 
  2. ^ Curt Sylvester (December 25, 1968). "U-M Shopping as Bump Moves Up". Detroit Free Press. p. 1D. 
  3. ^ George Cantor (December 27, 1968). "U-M Picks Miami of Ohio Grid Coach". Detroit Free Press. p. 1D. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "1969 College Football Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 31, 2017. 
  5. ^ "No Hawks Named All-Big Ten" (PDF). The Daily Iowan. November 26, 1969. p. 6. 
  6. ^ "Bucks Head All-Big Ten". Oshkosh Daily Northwestern. November 28, 1969. p. 16. 
  7. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. pp. 5–6. Retrieved January 31, 2017. 
  8. ^ "1969 Heisman Trophy Voting". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 31, 2017.