1969 UCLA Bruins football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1969 UCLA Bruins football
Conference Pacific-8
Ranking
Coaches No. 10
AP No. 13
1969 record 8–1–1 (5–1–1 Pac-8)
Head coach Tommy Prothro
Home stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Seasons
« 1968 1970 »
1969 Pacific-8 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#3 USC $ 6 0 0     10 0 1
#13 UCLA 5 1 1     8 1 1
#19 Stanford 5 1 1     7 2 1
Oregon State 4 3 0     6 4 0
Oregon 2 3 0     5 5 1
California 2 4 0     5 5 0
Washington 1 6 0     1 9 0
Washington State 0 7 0     1 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1969 UCLA Bruins football team represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1969 college football season.

Regular season[edit]

This was the year Prothro had geared his recruiting efforts towards as he believed this was his best team and was capable of contending for the national championship. The Bruins, quarterbacked by a sensational Jr. College transfer Dennis Dummit discovered by Prothro, were undefeated until they faced #10 Stanford in Palo Alto. Once again, Prothro was let down by now senior kicker Zenon Andrusyshyn as he missed a short field goal late in the game with the score tied 20–20. Suddenly, two long Jim Plunkett passes had Stanford in field goal range in the final seconds, but UCLA blocked Steve Horowitz's attempt to preserve the tie.

Once again, the UCLA-USC game would decide the Pac-8 title and the 1970 Rose Bowl berth. UCLA was ranked 6th with a 5–0–1 record in conference and 8–0–1 overall USC was #5 and was 6–0 in conference and 8–0–1 overall (tied Notre Dame in South Bend, 14–14); UCLA and USC were both unbeaten coming into their rivalry game for the first time since 1952. UCLA scored midway through the fourth quarter to take a 12–7 lead (knowing he need a win and not a tie to advance to the Rose Bowl, Prothro had the Bruins go for two after each touchdown and each attempt failed). USC then drove to the winning touchdown with 1:38 to play to win 14–12. The Trojans were aided by two controversial calls; the first was a dubious pass interference call on UCLA's Danny Graham on a 4th-and-10 incompletion. Secondly, on the winning touchdown pass reception, USC receiver Sam Dickerson appeared to be either out of bounds, out of the back of the end zone, or both. This loss supposedly was harder for Prothro to take than the 1967 loss and the freak officiating calls resembled the debacle at Tennessee in 1965.

Players and coaches[edit]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
September 13 Oregon State No. 17 Los Angeles Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA W 37–0  
September 20 Pittsburgh* No. 17 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 42–8  
September 27 at Wisconsin* No. 14 Camp Randall StadiumMadison, WI W 34–23  
October 4 at Northwestern* No. 11 Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL W 36–0  
October 11 at Washington State No. 11 Joe Albi StadiumSpokane, WA W 46–14  
October 18 California No. 8 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 32–0  
October 25 at No. 19 Stanford No. 6 Stanford StadiumStanford, CA T 20–20  
November 1 Washington No. 9 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 57–14  
November 15 at Oregon No. 7 Autzen StadiumEugene, OR W 13–10  
November 22 at No. 5 USC No. 6 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA (Victory Bell) L 14–12  
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

[1]

Game notes[edit]

USC[edit]

1 2 3 4 Total
UCLA 6 0 0 6 12
USC 0 7 0 7 14

[2]


References[edit]

  1. ^ College Football @ Sports-Reference.com
  2. ^ "Trojans Topple UCLA". The Palm Beach Post. November 23, 1969.