1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

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1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
UCLA after 1971 NCAA championship.png
UCLA after winning the national championship
National Champions
Pacific-8 Champions
NCAA Tournament, National Final, W 68–62 vs. Villanova
Conference Pacific-8 Conference
Ranking
Coaches No. 1
AP No. 1
1970–71 record 29–1 (14–0 Pac-8)
Head coach John Wooden
Assistant coach Denny Crum
Assistant coach Gary Cunningham
Home arena Pauley Pavilion
Seasons
1970–71 Pacific-8 Conference men's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
#1 UCLA 14 0   1.000     29 1   .967
USC 12 2   .857     24 2   .923
Oregon 8 6   .571     17 9   .654
California 8 6   .571     16 9   .640
Washington 6 8   .429     15 13   .536
Oregon State 4 10   .286     12 14   .462
Washington State 2 12   .143     12 14   .462
Stanford 2 12   .143     6 20   .231
As of 1971[1]; Rankings from AP Poll

The 1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won the National Collegiate Champion again on March 13, 1971, in the Astrodome Houston, Texas. It became the seventh championship in eight years under head coach John Wooden. UCLA defeated Villanova, 68-62. Villanova's second place was vacated later by NCAA.[2]

Smith Barrier, Executive Sports Editor, The Greensboro Daily News and Record wrote: "Mister John Wooden has a watch factory out in Los Angeles. It's a bit different from most Swiss works. They don't make watches, they win 'em."[2]

The victory against UC Santa Barbara on January 30, 1971, was the beginning of UCLA's record 88-game winning streak that stretched into the 1973–74 season.

UCLA averaged 83.5 points per game, while allowed 71.1 points per game to the opponents. Seniors Sidney Wicks and Curtis Rowe were selected to the consensus All-America team.[3]

The Bruins won in the NCAA West Regional in Salt Lake City, UT, over BYU (91–73) and Long Beach State (57–55) to advance to the Final Four, where they defeated Kansas (68–60) in the semi-final game.

Roster[edit]

1970–71 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Height Weight Year Previous school Hometown
G Betchley, RickRick Betchley 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Sr
G Bibby, HenryHenry Bibby 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Jr
G Booker, KennyKenny Booker 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Sr
Chapman, JonJon Chapman
Curtis, TommyTommy Curtis Current redshirt
F Ecker, JohnJohn Ecker 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Sr
F Farmer, LarryLarry Farmer 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
So
G Hill, AndyAndy Hill 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Jr
Hollyfield, LarryLarry Hollyfield
C Patterson, SteveSteve Patterson 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Sr
F Rowe, CurtisCurtis Rowe 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Sr
G Schofield, TerryTerry Schofield 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Sr
F Wicks, SidneySidney Wicks 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Sr
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • (W) Walk-on

Roster
Last update: 2016-Mar-20

Schedule[edit]

Sidney Wicks was a consensus All-American
Kenny Booker against Kansas in the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament
Date
Time, TV
Rank# Opponent# Result Record High points High rebounds High assists Site (Attendance)
City, State
December 4, 1970*
No. 1 Baylor W 108–77 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 5, 1970*
No. 1 Rice W 124–78 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 11, 1970*
No. 1 Pacific W 100–88 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 12, 1970*
No. 1 Tulsa W 95–75 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 22, 1970*
No. 1 Missouri W 94–75 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 23, 1970*
No. 1 Saint Louis W 79–65 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
December 29, 1970*
No. 1 vs. William & Mary
Steel Bowl
W 90–71 
                   
Pittsburgh, PA
December 30, 1970*
No. 1 at Pittsburgh
Steel Bowl
W 77–65 
                   
Pittsburgh, PA
January 2, 1971*
No. 1 Dayton W 106–82 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
January 8, 1971
No. 1 Washington W 78–69 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
January 9, 1971
No. 1 Washington State W 95–71 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
January 15, 1971
No. 1 at Stanford W 58–53 
                   
Stanford, CA
January 16, 1971
No. 1 at California W 94–76 
                   
Berkeley, CA
January 22, 1971*
No. 1 at Loyola (IL) W 87–62 
                   
 
January 23, 1971*
No. 1 at No. 9 Notre Dame L 82–89 
                   
South Bend, IN
January 30, 1971*
No. 2 UC Santa Barbara W 74–61 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
February 6, 1971
No. 3 at No. 2 USC W 64–60 
                   
Los Angeles, CA
February 12, 1971
No. 1 at Oregon W 69–68 
                  McArthur Court 
Eugene, OR
February 13, 1971
No. 1 at Oregon State W 67–65 
                   
Corvallis, OR
February 19, 1971
No. 1 Oregon State W 94–64 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
February 20, 1971
No. 1 Oregon W 74–67 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
February 27, 1971
No. 1 at Washington State W 57–53 
                   
Pullman, WA
March 1, 1971
No. 1 at Washington W 71–69 
                   
Seattle, WA
March 5, 1971
No. 1 California W 103–69 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
March 6, 1971
No. 1 Stanford W 107–72 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
March 13, 1971
No. 1 No. 3 USC W 73–62 
                  Pauley Pavilion 
Los Angeles, CA
March 18, 1971*
No. 1 vs. No. 20 BYU
NCAA Tournament • Regional Semifinals
W 91–73 
                   
 
March 20, 1971*
No. 1 vs. No. 16 Long Beach State
NCAA Tournament • Regional Final
W 57–55 
                   
 
March 25, 1971*
No. 1 vs. No. 4 Kansas
NCAA Tournament • National Semifinals
W 68–60 
                   
 
March 27, 1971*
No. 1 vs. No. 19 Villanova
NCAA Tournament • National Final
W 68–62 
                   
 
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll. (#) Tournament seedings in parentheses.

[4]

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1972 Official Collegiate Basketball Guide, College Athletics Publishing Service, 1971
  2. ^ a b Official Collegiate Basketball Guide 1972, College Athletic Publishing Service, 1972
  3. ^ Jerry Crowe, "In time of great change, Sidney Wicks helped UCLA stay the same", Los Angeles Times, March 2, 2009
  4. ^ 2015-16 UCLA media guide. Retrieved 2016-Mar-20.

External links[edit]