1970 Baltimore Colts season

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1970 Baltimore Colts season
Head coachDon McCafferty
OwnerCarroll Rosenbloom
Home fieldMemorial Stadium
Results
Record11–2–1
Division place1st AFC East
Playoff finishWon Divisional Playoffs (Bengals) 17–0
Won Conference Championship (Raiders) 27–17
Won Super Bowl V (Cowboys) 16–13
The Colts playing against the Cowboys in Super Bowl V

The 1970 Baltimore Colts season was the 18th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1970 season with a record of 11 wins, 2 losses and 1 tie. They won the first AFC East title. The Colts finished their season in Miami with a Super Bowl victory over the Cowboys, their first Super Bowl title and 3rd world championship overall (1958, 1959, and 1970.)

NFL Draft[edit]

Round Pick Player Position School/Club Team
1 18 Norm Bulaich Running Back TCU
2 44 Jim Bailey Defensive tackle Kansas
3 70 Jim O'Brien Wide Receiver Cincinnati
3 74 Ara Person Tight End Morgan State
4 95 Steve Smear Linebacker Penn State
5 122 Billy Newsome Defensive End Grambling State
6 148 Ron Gardin Defensive Back Arizona
7 174 Gordon Slade Quarterback Davidson
8 199 Bob Bouley Tackle Boston College
9 226 Barney Harris Defensive Back Texas A&M

Personnel[edit]

Staff/Coaches[edit]

1970 Baltimore Colts staff
Front Office

Coaching Staff

Offensive Coaches

Defensive Coaches

Final roster[edit]

1970 Baltimore Colts roster
Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists

{{{reserve_lists}}}


Rookies in italics

Regular season[edit]

Schedule[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result Record Game Site Attendance
1 September 20, 1970 at San Diego Chargers W 16–14 1–0 San Diego Stadium
47,782
2 September 28, 1970 Kansas City Chiefs L 24–44 1–1 Memorial Stadium
53,911
3 October 4, 1970 at Boston Patriots W 14–6 2–1 Harvard Stadium
38,235
4 October 11, 1970 at Houston Oilers W 24–20 3–1 Astrodome
48,050
5 October 18, 1970 at New York Jets W 29–22 4–1 Shea Stadium
63,301
6 October 25, 1970 Boston Patriots W 27–3 5–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240
7 November 1, 1970 Miami Dolphins W 35–0 6–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240
8 November 9, 1970 at Green Bay Packers W 13–10 7–1 Milwaukee County Stadium
48,063
9 November 15, 1970 Buffalo Bills T 17–17 7–1–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240
10 November 22, 1970 at Miami Dolphins L 17–34 7–2–1 Miami Orange Bowl
67,699
11 November 29, 1970 Chicago Bears W 21–20 8–2–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240
12 December 6, 1970 Philadelphia Eagles W 29–10 9–2–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240
13 December 13, 1970 at Buffalo Bills W 20–14 10–2–1 War Memorial Stadium
34,346
14 December 19, 1970 New York Jets W 35–20 11–2–1 Memorial Stadium
60,240

Game summaries[edit]

Week 1[edit]

1 234Total
Colts 0 376 16
Chargers 0 077 14

[1]

Week 2[edit]

1 234Total
• Chiefs 10 21310 44
Colts 0 7314 24

[2]

Week 3[edit]

1 234Total
• Colts 0 707 14
Patriots 0 303 6

[3]

Week 4[edit]

1 234Total
• Colts 7 1007 24
Oilers 0 776 20

[4]

Week 5[edit]

1 234Total
• Colts 17 363 29
Jets 3 2143 22

[5]

Week 6[edit]

1 234Total
Patriots 0 300 3
• Colts 3 1437 27

[6]

Week 7[edit]

1 234Total
Dolphins 0 000 0
• Colts 7 7147 35

[7]

Week 8[edit]

1 234Total
• Colts 0 760 13
Packers 3 007 10

[8]

Week 9[edit]

Week 10[edit]

Week 11[edit]

1 234Total
Bears 17 003 20
• Colts 0 1407 21

[9]

Week 12[edit]

1 234Total
Eagles 0 370 10
• Colts 13 1033 29

[10]

Week 13[edit]

1 234Total
Colts 10 073 20
Bills 7 700 14

[11]

The Colts clinched the division title with the win.

Week 14[edit]

1 234Total
Jets 7 733 20
• Colts 0 14714 35

[12]

Standings[edit]

AFC East
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
Baltimore Colts 11 2 1 .846 6–1–1 8–2–1 321 234 W4
Miami Dolphins 10 4 0 .714 6–2 8–3 297 228 W6
New York Jets 4 10 0 .286 2–6 2–9 255 286 L3
Buffalo Bills 3 10 1 .231 3–4–1 3–7–1 204 337 L5
Boston Patriots 2 12 0 .143 2–6 2–9 149 361 L3

Note: Tie games were not officially counted in the standings until 1972.

Postseason[edit]

The team made it to the playoffs with the best record in the AFC. The Colts hosted both AFC playoff games that they played in. (It wasn't until the 1975 season that playoff teams were seeded by record; the fact that the Colts hosted both playoff games was just due to the rotation set up with the AFL–NFL merger.) The team won both AFC playoff games as well as Super Bowl V.

Playoff Round Date Opponent Result Record Game Site Attendance
Divisional December 26, 1970 Cincinnati Bengals W 17–0 1–0 Memorial Stadium
51,127
Conference Championship January 2, 1971 Oakland Raiders W 27–17 2–0 Memorial Stadium
56,368
Super Bowl January 17, 1971 Dallas Cowboys W 16–13 3–0 Miami Orange Bowl
80,055

Divisional[edit]

1 234Total
Bengals 0 000 0
• Colts 7 307 17

The Colts hosted the Cincinnati Bengals in the divisional round. The Colts relied on their defense, which had carried them all season, to best the Bengals 17–0, holding Cincinnati to only 139 total yards.[13]

Conference Championship[edit]

1 234Total
Raiders 0 377 17
• Colts 3 7107 27

The Colts next hosted the Oakland Raiders for the AFC Championship Game. The Colts jumped out to an early lead over the Raiders, 10–3 at halftime. Oakland came back to tie it up early in the 3rd quarter. The Colts would respond with a Jim O'Brien field goal and a second Bulaich touchdown. Johnny Unitas extended the lead with a 68-yard touchdown pass to Ray Perkins that made the score 27–17. The Colts would seal the win with an interception in the end zone.[14]

Super Bowl[edit]

1 234Total
Cowboys 3 1000 13
• Colts 0 6010 16

The Colts made it to the Super Bowl for the second time in franchise history and played the Dallas Cowboys for the NFL championship. In the 2nd quarter, Johnny Unitas threw a pass that was tipped twice before John Mackey caught it for a 75-yard score. Later in the quarter Unitas was injured and Earl Morrall completed a sloppy and turnover-filled game: the Colts committed a total of 7 turnovers, the Cowboys 4. Following an interception by Mike Curtis, Jim O'Brien kicked the game-winning 32-yard field goal, giving Baltimore a 16–13 lead with 5 seconds left in the game, and the victory.[15]

References[edit]

See also[edit]