1971 World Snooker Championship

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World Snooker Championship
Tournament information
Dates 28 September–7 November 1970
Final venue Chevron Hotel
Final city Sydney
Country Australia
Organisation(s) WPBSA
Format Ranking event
Winner's share £2,333
Highest break Australia Eddie Charlton (129)
Final
Champion England John Spencer
Runner-up Australia Warren Simpson
Score 37–29
1970
1972
1971 World Snooker Championship is located in New South Wales
Sydney
Sydney
Brisbane
Brisbane
Newcastle
Newcastle
Kurri Kurri
Kurri Kurri
Lithgow
Lithgow
Wingham
Wingham
Wagga Wagga
Wagga Wagga
Dubbo
Dubbo
Port Macquarie
Port Macquarie
Nambucca Heads
Nambucca Heads
Griffith
Griffith
Lismore
Lismore
Forbes
Forbes
Venues in New South Wales

The 1971 World Snooker Championship was a professional snooker tournament that took place between 28 September and 7 November 1970 in Australia.[1][2] Matches were held at various locations in New South Wales with one match played in Brisbane.

John Spencer won his second World Championship title by defeating Warren Simpson 37–29 in the final. Eddie Charlton made the highest break of the tournament with a break of 129 in the final session of his match against Gary Owen.[3][4]

Tournament summary[edit]

This was the first time the championship was held outside the United Kingdom. It would be hosted in Australia again in 1975.[2]

The initial stage was a round robin in which each competitor played a 3-day, 37-frame match against four of the other eight competitors.[1][5] It is the only time a round robin format has been used in the world championship.

The first match between Paddy Morgan and Warren Simpson was from 28 to 30 September[6] and was won by Morgan by a score of 21–16.[7] Eddie Charlton and Norman Squire met in the second match, during which Charlton made a break of 106, the first century of the championship.[8] The British players did not start their matches until 6 October when John Spencer, John Pulman and Gary Owen started their first matches.[9]

Ray Reardon started his first match on 9 October,[10] beating Perrie Mans.[8] Spencer made a break of 105 in his second win, over Norman Squire.[8] Reardon and Spencer played again from 12 to 14 October. Reardon beat Charlton while Spencer beat Pulman.[11] Charlton made a break of 116 while Pulman made one of 113 while Spencer a 102 break.[12][13] Simpson met Owen from 13 to 15 October. Owen led 17–14 and 18–17 but Simpson won the last two frames to win 18–17.[14]

Owen scored his first century in his match against Squire, a break of 102.[15] Owen and Charlton won their second matches and met over the following three daysl.[16] Reardon met Morgan in Brisbane and led 20–10 after the final afternoon session. The third win guaranteed his place in the semi-final where he would meet John Spencer.[17]

Charlton beat Owen to give him his third win and a place in the semi-final. Charlton made breaks of 129 and 124 on the final day.[3] Simpson then beat Perrie Mans 19–18 to gain the last semi-final place.

The first semi-final between Charlton and Simpson was played from 25 to 28 October at Forbes Golf Club. Simpson led 7–5 after the first day and maintained a 13–11 lead after the second day.[18] Simpson won the last 5 frames on the third day to lead 21–15.[19] Simpson clinched the match of the final day when he won the third frame of the evening session to lead 25–20. Dead frames were played with the final score being 27–22. the best break of the match was a 95 by Simpson.[20]

The second semi-final between Spencer and Reardon was played from 27 to 30 October at Parramatta Leagues Club, Sydney.[17] Spencer took a 9–3 lead on the first day.[19] Reardon made a 108 break during the evening session.[21] Spencer extended his lead to 19–5 after two days[20] and won the match 25–7 on the third evening. Spencer made a break of 106 on the third afternoon and Reardon made one of 109 in a dead frame on the third evening.[22] The match ended with Spencer leading 34–15. Reardon's defeat meant he held the record as the player with the shortest reign as world champion.[23]

The final was held from 2 to 7 November at the Chevron Hotel in Sydney.[22][24] Spencer won his second world title and earned £2,333.[25] Spencer led 8–4 after the first day[26] and 17–7 after the second day. He made a break of 105 on the second afternoon and then made breaks of 126 and 107 in the second and third frames of the evening session.[27] At the half-way stage Simpson had reduced Spencer's lead to 20–16[28] but Spencer led 29–19 after four days[29] and eventually won 37–29 on the final day.[30] Simpson reached the final at his first attempt.[2]

Round-robin stage[edit]

Match Winner Score Runner up Date Venue Ref.
1 Australia Paddy Morgan 21–16 Australia Warren Simpson 28–30 September Kings Cross RSL Club, Sydney [31][32]
2 Australia Eddie Charlton 27–10 Australia Norman Squire 2–4 October Kurri Kurri RSL Club [33]
3 England John Spencer 20–17 South Africa Perrie Mans 6–8 October Canterbury-Bankstown Leagues Club, Sydney [34][35][36]
4 Australia Warren Simpson 22–15 England John Pulman 6–8 October South Newcastle Leagues Club, Newcastle [34][35][36]
5 Wales Gary Owen 26–11 Australia Paddy Morgan 6–8 October Wentworthville RSL Club, Sydney [34][35][36]
6 England John Spencer 27–10 Australia Norman Squire 9–11 October Lithgow Workers' Club [37][38]
7 Wales Ray Reardon 21–16 South Africa Perrie Mans 9–11 October Wingham RSL Club [37][38]
8 England John Spencer 23–14 England John Pulman 12–14 October Wagga Wagga RSL Club [12][13]
9 Wales Ray Reardon 21–16 Australia Eddie Charlton 12–14 October Wallsend RSL Club, Newcastle [39][12][13]
10 Australia Warren Simpson 19–18 Wales Gary Owen 13–15 October Dubbo Ex-Servicemen's Club [12][13][40]
11 England John Pulman 25–12 Australia Paddy Morgan 15–17 October Coogee-Randwick RSL Club, Sydney [40][41][42]
12 Wales Gary Owen 19–18 Australia Norman Squire 17–19 October Port Macquarie RSL Club [41][42]
13 Australia Eddie Charlton 26–11 South Africa Perrie Mans 17–19 October Nambucca Heads RSL Club [41][42][43]
14 Wales Ray Reardon 27–10 Australia Paddy Morgan 19–21 October Queensland Masonic Club, Brisbane [43][44][45]
15 Australia Eddie Charlton 23–14 Wales Gary Owen 20–22 October City Tattersalls Club, Sydney [44][4]
16 Australia Warren Simpson 19–18 South Africa Perrie Mans 21–23 October Griffith Ex-Servicemen's Club [44][4]
17 England John Pulman 26–11 Australia Norman Squire 21–23 October Parramatta RSL Club, Sydney [44][4]
18 Wales Ray Reardon 21–16 England John Spencer 22–24 October Lismore Workers' Club [4][19]

Morgan missed the final session in his match against Reardon. Reardon had won the match and was leading 20–10.

Table

Pos Player Pld MW ML FW FL FD Pts
1 Wales Ray Reardon 4 4 0 90 58 +32 8
2 Australia Eddie Charlton 4 3 1 92 56 +36 6
3 England John Spencer 4 3 1 86 62 +24 6
4 Australia Warren Simpson 4 3 1 76 72 +4 6
5 England John Pulman 4 2 2 80 68 +12 4
6 Wales Gary Owen 4 2 2 77 71 +6 4
7 Australia Paddy Morgan 4 1 3 54 94 −40 2
8 South Africa Perrie Mans 4 0 4 62 86 −24 0
9 Australia Norman Squire 4 0 4 49 99 −50 0

The basis on which the semi-final draw was organised is not known. The 22 October edition of The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Reardon would play Spencer in the second semi-final. At the time Reardon and Spencer still had to play each other and Charlton, Owen and Simpson also had one match to play. So the final order of the group was still undecided.[17]

Knockout stage[edit]

Sources:[1][5][46]

Semi-finals
49 frames
Final
Best of 73 frames
           
Australia Eddie Charlton 22
Australia Warren Simpson 27
Australia Warren Simpson 29
England John Spencer 37
England John Spencer 34
Wales Ray Reardon 15

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "World Championship 1971". Global Snooker. Archived from the original on 28 December 2010. Retrieved 4 January 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Snooker to Charlton – Breaks of 129 and 124". The Sydney Morning Herald. 23 October 1970. p. 17. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 23 October 1970. p. 18. 
  5. ^ a b "1971 World Championships Results". Snooker Database. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  6. ^ "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 September 1970. p. 17. 
  7. ^ "21-16 in Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 1 October 1970. p. 17. 
  8. ^ a b c "Spencer's 105 break in title snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 12 October 1970. p. 17. 
  9. ^ "Snooker stars seek title". The Sydney Morning Herald. 5 October 1970. p. 17. 
  10. ^ "Spencer shows class in snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 9 October 1970. p. 14. 
  11. ^ "Charlton beaten – Early frames vital". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 October 1970. p. 16. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 14 October 1970. p. 21. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 October 1970. p. 18. 
  14. ^ "Simpson's exciting snooker win". The Sydney Morning Herald. 16 October 1970. p. 17. 
  15. ^ "First snooker win". The Sun-Herald. 18 October 1970. p. 75. 
  16. ^ "Test for Charlton". The Sydney Morning Herald. 20 October 1970. p. 23. 
  17. ^ a b c "Reardon in final four". The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 October 1970. p. 15. 
  18. ^ "Simpson retains 2-frame lead". The Sydney Morning Herald. 27 October 1970. p. 23. 
  19. ^ a b c "Simpson leads by six frames". The Sydney Morning Herald. 28 October 1970. p. 17. 
  20. ^ a b "Simpson enter final of world snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 October 1970. p. 17. 
  21. ^ "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 28 October 1970. p. 19. 
  22. ^ a b "Spencer makes the final". The Sydney Morning Herald. 30 October 1970. p. 15. 
  23. ^ Eric, Hayton (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker: The Complete Record & History. London: Rose Villa Publications. ISBN 978-0-9548549-0-4. 
  24. ^ "Spencer regains snooker title". The Times. 9 November 1970. p. 13. 
  25. ^ "1971 World Championships Player Prize Money". Snooker Database. Retrieved 6 March 2012. 
  26. ^ "Spencer takes early lead over Simpson". The Times. 4 November 1970. p. 18. 
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  29. ^ "Spencer nears world title". The Glasgow Herald. 6 November 1970. p. 6. 
  30. ^ "Spencer regains the title". The Times. 9 November 1970. p. 13. 
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  32. ^ "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 1 October 1970. p. 14. 
  33. ^ "Snooker". The Sun-Herald. 4 October 1970. p. 69. 
  34. ^ a b c "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 7 October 1970. p. 18. 
  35. ^ a b c "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 8 October 1970. p. 19. 
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  37. ^ a b "Snooker". The Sun-Herald. 11 October 1970. p. 93. 
  38. ^ a b "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 12 October 1970. p. 16. 
  39. ^ "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 October 1970. p. 23. 
  40. ^ a b "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 16 October 1970. p. 17. 
  41. ^ a b c "Snooker". The Sun-Herald. 18 October 1970. p. 88. 
  42. ^ a b c "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 19 October 1970. p. 18. 
  43. ^ a b "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 20 October 1970. p. 22. 
  44. ^ a b c d "Snooker". The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 October 1970. p. 16. 
  45. ^ http://cuetracker.net/Tournaments/World-Championship/1970/911
  46. ^ "Embassy World Championship". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2012.