1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers season

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1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers
Stanley Cup champions
West Division champions
Division1st West
1973–74 record50–16–12
Home record28–6–5
Road record22–10–7
Goals for273 (5th)
Goals against164 (1st)
Team information
PresidentJoe Scott
General ManagerKeith Allen
CoachFred Shero
CaptainBobby Clarke
Alternate captainsTerry Crisp
Gary Dornhoefer
Joe Watson
ArenaSpectrum
Average attendance17,007[1]
Minor league affiliate(s)Richmond Robins
San Diego Gulls
Team leaders
GoalsBobby Clarke (35)
AssistsBobby Clarke (52)
PointsBobby Clarke (87)
Penalty minutesDave Schultz (348)
Plus/minusBarry Ashbee (+52)
WinsBernie Parent (47)
Goals against averageBernie Parent (1.89)

The 1973–74 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Flyers' seventh season in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Flyers became the first expansion team to win the Stanley Cup. Prior to this season, no post-1967 expansion team had either beaten an Original Six team in a playoff round or won a Stanley Cup Final game.

Goaltender Bernie Parent, an "Original Flyer", returned to the franchise in the off-season, and the Flyers proved that the expansion teams could challenge the Original Six in 1973–74. The Bullies continued their rough-and-tumble ways, led by Dave Schultz's 348 penalty minutes, and reached the top of the West Division with a record of 50–16–12. The return of Parent proved to be of great benefit as he established himself as one of if not the best goaltender in the league by winning 47 games, a record which stood for 33 years. Since the Flyers, along with Chicago, allowed the fewest goals in the league, Parent also shared the Vezina Trophy with Chicago's Tony Esposito.

Come playoff time, the Flyers swept the Atlanta Flames in four games in the first round. In the semifinals, the Flyers faced the New York Rangers. The series, which saw the home team win every game, went seven games. The Flyers had home-ice advantage as they advanced to the Stanley Cup Finals by winning Game 7. Their opponent, Bobby Orr and the Boston Bruins, took Game 1 in Boston, but Bobby Clarke scored an overtime goal in Game 2 to even the series. The Flyers won Games 3 and 4 at home to take a 3–1 series lead, but Boston won Game 5 to stave off elimination. That set the stage for Game 6 at the Spectrum. The Flyers picked up the lead early when Rick MacLeish scored a first-period goal. Late in the game, Orr hauled down Clarke on a breakaway, a penalty which assured the Flyers of victory. Time expired as the Flyers brought the Stanley Cup to Philadelphia for the first time. Parent, having shut out Boston in Game 6, won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the Playoff MVP.

Regular season[edit]

In addition to leading the team in penalty minutes, Dave Schultz was one of five 20 goal scorers on the Flyers.

The 1973–74 season opened on October 11, 1973, against the Toronto Maple Leafs. This was the first time Kate Smith performed "God Bless America" in person at a Flyers' game. The Flyers started strong to begin the season winning their first four games and only allowing their opponents to score three goals total while they netted 18. The Flyers were 29–11–6 heading into the All Star Game. The Flyers were represented in the All Star Game by Bobby Clarke, Bernie Parent, Ed Van Impe and Joe Watson. The Flyers finished 1st in the Western Division, seven points ahead of the second place Chicago Black Hawks.

The team was led offensively by Bobby Clarke, who led the team in goals with 35, assists with 52 and points with 87. He finished fifth among scoring leader in points. Clarke was named a 2nd Team All Stars along with defenseman Barry Ashbee. Clarke was followed by Bill Barber in goals (34), and by Rick MacLeish both in assists (45) and in points (77).

In net, the Flyers were led by goaltender Bernie Parent, who went 47–13–12, posted a 1.89 goals against average (136 goals against on 2038 shots) and 12 shutouts. Parent's 47 wins was a record until Martin Brodeur won 48 games in the 2006–07 NHL season. It remains the record for most regulation wins by a goaltender in a single season as several of Brodeur's wins came in overtime and the shootout, neither of which existed in the 1970s. Parent was a co-winner of the Vezina Trophy, which was awarded at the time to any goaltenders who played 25 or more games for the team allowing the fewest goals against, with Black Hawks' goaltender Tony Esposito.

Season standings[edit]

West Division[2]

GP W L T GF GA DIFF Pts
1 Philadelphia Flyers 78 50 16 12 273 164 +109 112
2 Chicago Black Hawks 78 41 14 23 272 164 +108 105
3 Los Angeles Kings 78 33 33 12 233 231 +2 78
4 Atlanta Flames 78 30 34 14 214 238 −24 74
5 Pittsburgh Penguins 78 28 41 9 242 273 −31 65
6 St. Louis Blues 78 26 40 12 206 248 −42 64
7 Minnesota North Stars 78 23 38 17 235 275 −40 63
8 California Golden Seals 78 13 55 10 195 342 −147 36


Playoffs[edit]

The Flyers opened the post season against the 4th place Atlanta Flames. The Flyers swept the Atlanta Flames in four games with a combined score of 17–6. Rick MacLeish led the Flyers with four goals during the series. He scored a natural hat-trick in Game 2.

The Flyers headed into a grueling semifinals match up against the New York Rangers, who had won the regular season series 2–1–2. The series opened up in Philadelphia at the Spectrum with the Flyers shutting out the Rangers 4–0 in Game 1 and taking Game 2 5–2. The series switched back to New York and the Rangers would take Game 3 5–3 and Game 4 in overtime 2–1. The Flyers won Game 5 at home 4–1. With the Rangers on the verge of defeat in Game 6 the Rangers won 4–1. In Game 7 Gary Dornhoefer scored the game-winning goal with 10:59 left in the third. Rick MacLeish again led the Flyers in scoring in this series with seven goals. The home team was the winner of every game in the series.

This set up a Stanley Cup Finals matchup against the Boston Bruins, who won the season series 3–1–1. The series opened in Boston at the Boston Garden with Boston winning Game 1, 3–2 and the Flyers winning Game 2, 3–2 in overtime on a Bobby Clarke goal. The series moved to Philadelphia where the Flyers won Game 3, 4–1 and Game 4, 4–2. The series returned to Boston and Bruins won Game 5, 5–1. The series returned to Philadelphia for Game 6. Kate Smith performed "God Bless America" to a sell out crowd of 17,007 prior to the game. The Flyers won their first Stanley Cup on the lone goal of the game by Rick MacLeish in the first period. With seconds left on the Clock Gene Hart, the Flyers play-by-play announcer, made his famous call "Ladies and gentlemen, the Flyers are going to win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers win the Stanley Cup. The Flyers have won the Stanley Cup!". Bernie Parent was awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

Philadelphia Flyers 1974 Stanley Cup champions[edit]

Players

  Centres
  Wingers
  Defencemen
  Goaltenders

Coaching and administrative staff

  • Chairman/Owner: Ed Snider
  • President: Joe Scott
  • Vice Chairman: F. Eugene Dixon Jr.
  • Vice President/General Manager: Keith Allen
  • Head Coach: Fred Shero
  • Assistant Coach: Mike Nykoluk
  • Director of Player Development: Marcel Pelletier
  • Trainer: Frank Lewis
  • Assistant Trainer: Jim McKenzie
  • Director of Public Relations: Joe Kadlec (left off cup)
  • Director of Public Relations: John Brogan (left off cup)

Stanley Cup engraving

  • Al MacAdam played five regular season games and one playoff game. Although he did receive a Stanley Cup ring, his name was not engraved on the Stanley Cup.[3]
  • Joe Kadlec, John Brogan (Directors of Public Relations) were included on Philadelphia's Stanley Cup winning pictures in 1974, 1975, but their names do not appear on the Stanley Cup.

Schedule and results[edit]

Regular season[edit]

1973–74 regular season

Legend:   Win (2 points)   Loss (0 points)   Tie (1 point)

Playoffs[edit]

1974 Stanley Cup playoffs

Legend:   Win   Loss

Player statistics[edit]

Scoring[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
No. Player Age Pos GP G A Pts +/- PIM GP G A Pts +/- PIM
16 Bobby Clarke 24 C 77 35 52 87 35 113 17 5 11 16 1 42
19 Rick MacLeish 24 C 78 32 45 77 21 42 17 13 9 22 0 20
7 Bill Barber 21 LW 75 34 35 69 34 54 17 3 6 9 2 18
18 Ross Lonsberry 26 LW 75 32 19 51 16 48 17 4 9 11 0 18
12 Gary Dornhoefer 30 RW 57 11 39 50 13 125 14 5 6 11 5 43
21 Bill Flett 30 RW 67 17 27 44 20 51 17 0 6 6 3 21
26 Orest Kindrachuk 23 C 71 11 30 41 19 85 17 5 4 9 8 17
11 Don Saleski 24 RW 77 15 25 40 21 131 17 2 7 9 9 24
8 Dave Schultz 24 LW 73 20 16 36 26 348 17 2 4 6 4 139
17 Simon Nolet 32 RW 52 19 17 36 28 13 15 1 1 2 0 4
3 Tom Bladon 21 D 70 12 22 34 24 37 16 4 6 10 3 25
15 Terry Crisp 30 C 71 10 21 31 12 28 17 2 2 4 3 4
6 Andre Dupont 24 D 75 3 20 23 34 216 16 4 3 7 5 67
20 Jimmy Watson 21 D 74 2 18 20 33 44 17 1 2 3 1 41
2 Ed Van Impe 33 D 77 2 16 18 31 119 17 1 2 3 2 41
14 Joe Watson 30 D 74 1 17 18 28 34 17 1 4 5 8 24
10 Bill Clement 23 C 39 9 8 17 15 34 4 1 0 1 2 4
4 Barry Ashbee 34 D 69 4 13 17 52 52 6 0 0 0 5 2
9 Bob Kelly 23 LW 65 4 10 14 10 130 5 0 0 0 0 11
1 Bernie Parent 28 G 73 0 3 3 N/A 24 17 0 0 0 N/A 4
30 Bobby Taylor 29 G 7 0 0 0 N/A 12
25 Al MacAdam 21 RW 5 0 0 0 −2 0 1 0 0 0 −1 0
5 Serge Lajeunesse 23 D 1 0 0 0 0 0
27 Bruce Cowick 22 LW 8 0 0 0 −1 9

Goaltending[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
No. Player Age GP GS W L T SA GA GAA SV% SO TOI GP GS W L SA GA GAA SV% SO TOI
1 Bernie Parent 28 73 73 47 13 12 2006 136 1.89 .932 12 4,307:25 17 17 12 5 524 35 2.02 .933 2 1,039:24
30 Bobby Taylor 29 7 5 3 3 0 203 26 4.26 .876 0 365:51

Awards and records[edit]

Awards[edit]

Type Award/honor Recipient Ref
League (annual) Conn Smythe Trophy Bernie Parent [4]
Jack Adams Award Fred Shero [5]
Lester B. Pearson Award Bobby Clarke [6]
NHL First All-Star Team Bernie Parent (Goaltender) [7]
NHL Second All-Star Team Barry Ashbee (Defense) [7]
Bobby Clarke (Center)
Vezina Trophy Bernie Parent[a] [8]
League (in-season) NHL All-Star Game selection Bobby Clarke [9]
Bernie Parent
Ed Van Impe
Joe Watson

Records[edit]

  •  dagger  NHL record

Individual[edit]

Franchise player records set during the 1973–74 season
Record Type Total Player Date(s) Ref
Games started by a goaltender Streak 37 Bernie Parent 10/11/1973 – 1/10/1974 [10]
Games played by a goaltender Season 73 Bernie Parent [11]
Most wins Season 47 Bernie Parent [11]
Most wins in regulation time Season 47dagger Bernie Parent [12]
Most shutouts Season 12[b] Bernie Parent [11]
Most minutes played by a goaltender Season 4,314 Bernie Parent [11]
Best save percentage Season .932 Bernie Parent [13]
Powerplay goals scored by a defenseman, playoffs Season 3[c] Tom Bladon [14]
Game-winning goals scored, playoffs Season 4[d] Rick MacLeish [15]
Penalties in minutes, playoffs Season 139 Dave Schultz [15]

Team[edit]

Franchise team records set during the 1973–74 season
Record Type Total Refs
Fewest goals against Season 164 [16]
Most shutouts Season 13 [17]
Most home wins, playoffs Season 9[e]

Milestones[edit]

Franchise firsts[edit]

Franchise firsts[18]
Milestone Player Details Date Ref
30-win season, goaltender Bernie Parent Stopped 25 of 26 shots against the Montreal Canadiens February 10, 1974 [19]
40-win season, goaltender Bernie Parent Stopped 40 of 42 shots against the Minnesota North Stars March 16, 1974 [19]

Individual[edit]

Individual career milestones[20]
Milestone Player Details Date Ref
25th shutout Bernie Parent Stopped all 24 shots against the Montreal Canadiens March 3, 1974 [19]

Transactions[edit]

The Flyers were involved in the following transactions from May 11, 1973, the day after the deciding game of the 1973 Stanley Cup Finals, through May 19, 1974, the day of the deciding game of the 1974 Stanley Cup Finals.[21]

Trades[edit]

Date Details Ref
May 14, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Serge Lajeunesse
To Detroit Red Wings
Rick Foley
[22]
May 15, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
rights to Bernie Parent
2nd-round pick in 1973
To Toronto Maple Leafs
1st-round pick in 1973
future considerations[f]
[25]
May 25, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Bruce Cowick
To San Diego Gulls (WHL)
Bob Currier
Bob Hurlburt
Jim Stanfield
Tom Trevelyan
[26]
May 30, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
cash
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Willie Brossart
[27]
November 1, 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
George Pesut
To Detroit Red Wings
Bob Stumpf
[28]
December 1973 To Philadelphia Flyers
Ray Schultz
To Toronto Maple Leafs
Frank Spring
[29]

Signings[edit]

Free agency[edit]

The following players were signed by the Flyers via free agency.

Date Player Previous team (league) Term Ref
June 1973 Steve Coates Michigan Tech University (WCHA) [30]
July 31, 1973 Mark Bousquet American International College (ECAC 2) [31]
September 1973 Mike Boland Ottawa Nationals (WHA) [32]

Internal[edit]

The following players were either re-signed by the Flyers or, in the case of the team's selections in the NHL Entry Draft, signed to contracts.

Date Player Term Ref
June 5, 1973 Mike Clarke (DP) [33]
June 5, 1973 Dale Cook (DP) [33]
June 5, 1973 Bruce Cowick multi-year [33]
June 5, 1973 Larry Goodenough (DP) [33]
June 5, 1973 Michel Latreille (DP) [33]
June 5, 1973 Brent Levins (DP) [33]
June 5, 1973 Bob Stumpf (DP) [33]
June 12, 1973 Orest Kindrachuk multi-year [34]
June 22, 1973 Bernie Parent multi-year [23]
July 31, 1973 Tom Young (DP) [31]
July 31, 1973 Don O'Donahue (DP) [31]
August 20, 1973 Doug Ferguson (DP) 3-year [35]

NHL Intra-League Draft[edit]

The 1973 NHL Intra-League Draft was held on June 12, 1973.[36] Each NHL team placed 18 skaters and 2 goaltenders on a protected list from which the other teams could not select.[36] It cost $40,000 to make a claim.[36] The Flyers were not involved in any selections during the draft.[36]

Departures[edit]

The following players left the team via free agency, release, or retirement. Players who were under contract and left the team during the season are marked with an asterisk (*).

Date Player New team (league) Via Ref
September 12, 1973 Wayne Hillman Cleveland Crusaders (WHA) Free agency [37]

Draft picks[edit]

Philadelphia's picks at the 1973 NHL Amateur Draft, which was held at the Mount Royal Hotel in Montreal, Quebec on May 15, 1973.[38]

Round Pick Player Position Nationality Team (league) Notes
2 20 Larry Goodenough Defense  Canada London Knights (OHA) [g]
2 26 Brent Leavins Left Wing  Canada Swift Current Broncos (WCHL)
3 40 Bob Stumpf Right Wing  Canada New Westminster Bruins (WCHL) [h]
3 42 Mike Clarke Center  Canada Calgary Centennials (WCHL)
4 58 Dale Cook Left Wing  Canada Victoria Cougars (WCHL)
5 74 Michel Latreille Defense  Canada Montreal Red White and Blue (QMJHL)
6 90 Doug Ferguson Defense  Canada Hamilton Red Wings (OHA)
7 106 Tom Young Forward  Canada Sudbury Wolves (OHA)
8 122 Norm Barnes Defense  Canada Michigan State University (CCHA)
9 137 Dan O'Donohue Defense  Canada Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (OHA)
10 153 Brian Dick Right Wing  Canada Winnipeg Jets (WCHL)

Farm teams[edit]

The Flyers were affiliated with the Richmond Robins of the AHL[40] and the San Diego Gulls of the WHL.[41] Rene Drolet led the Robins with 73 points and Richmond finished 4th in their division and lost in five games to the Baltimore Clippers in the first round of the playoffs.[42] San Diego finished 3rd in the 6-team WHL's final season in existence. The Gulls also ceased operations once the New Jersey Knights of the WHA moved to San Diego and became the San Diego Mariners.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Co-winner with Chicago Black Hawks' Tony Esposito
  2. ^ Tied by Parent during 1974–75 season.
  3. ^ Tied by Doug Crossman in 1984–85 and Chris Pronger in 2009–10.
  4. ^ Tied by Bill Barber in 1979–80 and Danny Briere in 2009–10.
  5. ^ Tied during 1979–80 and 2009–10 seasons.
  6. ^ If Parent signed with the Flyers the Maple Leafs would receive their choice of goaltender Doug Favell or additional draft picks. Parent was signed on June 22[23] and the Maple Leafs chose Favell on July 27.[24]
  7. ^ The Flyers first-round pick, 10th overall, was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs along with future considerations (Doug Favell) for Bernie Parent and Toronto's second-round pick, 20th overall, on May 15, 1973.[39]
  8. ^ The Flyers traded Brent Hughes and Pierre Plante to the St. Louis Blues for Andre Dupont and St. Louis' third-round pick, 40th overall, on December 14, 1972.[39]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "All Time Team Attendance". P. Anson. Flyers History. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  2. ^ "1973-1974 Division Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". National Hockey League.
  3. ^ Legends of Hockey – NHL Player Search – Player – Al MacAdam
  4. ^ "Conn Smythe Trophy". National Hockey League. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  5. ^ "Jack Adams Award". National Hockey League. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  6. ^ "Ted Lindsay Award (formerly Lester B. Pearson Award)". National Hockey League. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  7. ^ a b 2014–15 NHL Official Guide & Record Book, p. 230–32
  8. ^ "Vezina Trophy". National Hockey League. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  9. ^ "27th NHL All-Star Game". NHL.com. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  10. ^ 2016–2017 Philadelphia Flyers Media Guide, p. 264
  11. ^ a b c d "NHL.com - Stats". National Hockey League. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  12. ^ Morreale, Mike G. (December 8, 2010). "Banner night for Parent as Flyers pay tribute". National Hockey League. Retrieved January 10, 2017.
  13. ^ "Flyers History - Career and Season Records". P. Anson. Flyers History. Retrieved January 9, 2017.
  14. ^ "NHL.com - Stats". National Hockey League. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  15. ^ a b "NHL.com - Stats". National Hockey League. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  16. ^ "NHL.com - Stats". National Hockey League. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  17. ^ 2016–2017 Philadelphia Flyers Media Guide, pp. 273–275
  18. ^ "Flyers History – All-Time Firsts". P.Anson. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  19. ^ a b c "Flyers History – Philadelphia Flyer Goalie Game List". P.Anson. Retrieved August 12, 2015. Goalie Game List for Bernie Parent
  20. ^ "Flyers History – All-Time Milestone Award Winners". P.Anson. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  21. ^ "Hockey Transactions Search Results". Pro Sports Transactions. Retrieved April 12, 2014.
  22. ^ "SPORTS NOTES". AP. The Childress Index. May 15, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b "Flyers Sign Parent At Reduction in Pay". AP. Pottstown Mercury. June 23, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Flyers, Leafs Complete Trade". AP. Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph. July 28, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Flyers Trade Draft Pick For Rights to Parent". AP. Pottstown Mercury. May 16, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "no title". Brandon Sun. May 26, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Brossart sold to Maple Leafs". AP. Delaware County Times. May 31, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "no title". Brandon Sun. November 1, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Frank Spring – Notes". NHL.com. Retrieved December 18, 2014.
  30. ^ "Steve Coates – Notes". NHL.com. Retrieved December 18, 2014.
  31. ^ a b c "Flyers Sign Amateurs". AP. Standard-Speaker. August 1, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Mike Boland – Notes". NHL.com. Retrieved December 18, 2014.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g "Flyers Sign Six". AP. The Bridgeport Post. June 6, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Flyers Sign AHL Star Kindrachuk". AP. The Post-Standard. June 13, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Draft Choice Ferguson Signs Flyers' Pact". AP. The Post-Standard. August 21, 1973. Retrieved December 18, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ a b c d Parsons, Mark (November 24, 2012). "1973 NHL Intra-League Draft". Historical Hockey Stats & Trivia. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  37. ^ "Crusaders sign Hillman brothers". UPI. Ottawa Journal. September 12, 1973. p. 28. Retrieved March 23, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "1973 NHL Amateur Draft Picks at hockeydb.com". hockeyDB.com. Retrieved November 12, 2013.
  39. ^ a b "1973 NHL Amateur Draft Pick Transactions". Pro Sports Transactions. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  40. ^ "AHL Franchise Statistics". P. Anson. Flyers History. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  41. ^ "Non-AHL Affiliates". P. Anson. Flyers History. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  42. ^ "AHL Season Overview: 1973–74". P. Anson. Flyers History. Retrieved October 26, 2013.