1973 Washington Huskies football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1973 Washington Huskies football
Washington Huskies logo.svg
Conference Pacific-8
1973 record 2–9 (0–7 Pac-8)
Head coach Jim Owens (17th season)
MVP Dave Pear
Captain Jim Andrilenas
Captain Butch Keenan
Captain Joe Tabor
Captain John Whitacre
Home stadium Husky Stadium
Seasons
← 1972
1974 →
1973 Pacific-8 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 8 USC $ 7 0 0     9 2 1
No. 12 UCLA 6 1 0     9 2 0
Stanford 5 2 0     7 4 0
Washington State 4 3 0     5 6 0
California 2 5 0     4 7 0
Oregon 2 5 0     2 9 0
Oregon State 2 5 0     2 9 0
Washington 0 7 0     2 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1973 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 1973 NCAA Division I football season. In its 17th season under head coach Jim Owens, the team compiled an 2–9 record, finished in last place in the Pacific-8 Conference, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 376 to 218.[1] Dave Pear was selected as the team's most valuable player.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 15 Hawaii* Husky StadiumSeattle, WA L 7–10   52,500
September 22 at Duke* Wallace Wade StadiumDurham, NC L 21–23   22,500
September 29 Syracuse* Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 21–7   54,500
October 6 at California California Memorial StadiumBerkeley, CA L 49–54   28,000
October 13 Oregon State Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA L 7–31   55,000
October 20 Stanford Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA L 14–23   51,500
October 27 at Oregon Autzen StadiumEugene, OR L 0–58   40,000
November 3 at No. 10 UCLA Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA L 13–62   30,000
November 10 Idaho* Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 41–14   50,000
November 17 No. 9 USC Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA L 19–42   55,500
November 24 Washington State Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA (Apple Cup) L 26–52   56,500
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Washington Yearly Results (1970-1974)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved December 14, 2015.