1974 Giro d'Italia

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1974 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates 16 May – 9 June
Stages 22, including one split stage
Distance 4,001 km (2,486 mi)
Winning time 113h 09 '13"
Results
Winner  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Molteni)
  Second  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA) (Scic)
  Third  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (Bianchi)

Points  Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL) (Brooklyn)
Mountains  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (Kas)
  Team Kas
← 1973
1975 →

The 1974 Giro d'Italia was the 58th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Vatican City, on 16 May, with a 164 km (102 mi) stage and concluded in Milan, on 8 June, with 257 km (160 mi) leg. A total of 140 riders from fourteen teams entered the 22-stage race, that was won by Belgian Eddy Merckx of the Molteni team. The second and third places were taken by Italians Gianbattista Baronchelli and Felice Gimondi, respectively.[1][2] Merckx's victory in the 1974 Giro was his first step in completing the Triple Crown of Cycling – winning the Giro d'Italia, the Tour de France, and the World Championship road race in one calendar year – becoming the first rider ever to do so.

Amongst the other classifications that the race awarded, Brooklyn's Roger De Vlaeminck won the points classification and José Manuel Fuente of KAS won the mountains classification. KAS finished as the winners of the team points classification.

Teams[edit]

A total of fourteen teams were invited to participate in the 1974 Giro d'Italia. Each team sent a squad of ten riders, which meant that the race started with a peloton of 140 cyclists.[3] Three riders from Rokado did not start the race after enrolling, which reduced the starting field to 137.[3] From the riders that began this edition, 96 made it to the finish Milan.[3]

The teams entering the race were:

  • Ovest Rokado
  • Sammontana
  • Scic
  • Zonca

Pre-race favorites[edit]

Reigning champion and four-time winner Eddy Merckx returned to the race in 1974 to defend his crown and to claim fifth victory and join the likes of Alfredo Binda and Fausto Coppi who also had five Giro victories.[3] He arrived to the race the day before after racing in the Four Days of Dunkirk.[4] Merckx came into the Giro d'Italia after not having won a single spring classic for the first time since 1965.[3] In March, he was forced to take a rest from cycling due to a respiratory ailment.[5] Merckx gradually returned to racing after beating the illnes in late March, and writer Giuliano Califano stated that several experts found him to be in great form coming into the Giro.[5] La Stampa writer Gianni Pignata noted that Merckx's form and how his poor performance early on provided motivation for the Giro.[6] In particular, he referenced Merckx's poor sprinting in the early season and how the Giro was his first race longer than seven stages this season.[6]

José Manuel Fuente was thought to have entered the Giro in good form after winning the Vuelta a España weeks earlier.[3][4][7] Pignata commented that Fuente would provide Merckx a stiff opposition through his ability to attack in the mountains, but his poor time trialing ability was his weakness.[6] l'Unita interviewed several of the riders and many named Merckx as the favorite to take the victory.[8] Gino Sala named Gianbattista Baronchelli, Giovanni Battaglin, and Francesco Moser as three young riders who have the potential to become stars during the race.[9][10] Pignata believed Battaglin's participation in the Tour de Romandie provided a great lead-up into the Giro.[6] Pignata ultimately concluded that these younger riders should not be cautious during the race as it would play into the hands of Merckx, who then would only have to react to Fuente's attacks.[6] Giuliano Califano of La Stampa believed that Merckx's biggest rival would be reigning world champion Felice Gimondi.[5] Amidst rumors of not participating, Luis Ocaña confirmed three days before the start that he would not be racing this edition of the Giro because he was suffering from bronchitis.[11][12] La Stampa columnist Maurizio Caravella gave Merckx a 60% chance to win, while giving Gimondi, Fuente, and Battaglin at 10% chance and Baronchelli and Moser a 5% chance at victory.[13] The peloton also featured 1971 winner Gösta Pettersson.[3]

Route and stages[edit]

A mountain in the distance.
Monte Generoso hosted the end of the 158 km (98 mi) sixteenth stage.

The route for the 1974 edition of the Giro d'Italia was revealed to the public by race director Vincenzo Torriani on 29 March 1974.[14][15] It contained one were individual time trial.[14][15] There were eleven stages containing twenty three categorized climbs, of which four had summit finishes: stage 11a, to Il Cioccio; stage 16, to Monte Generoso; stage 18, to Borgo Valsugana; and stage 20, to Tre Cime di Lavaredo.[16][17] In total the race route contained 26.78 km (17 mi) of official climbing across the twenty-three climbs.[17] The organizers chose to include two rest days, in Capri and Sanremo.[18] When compared to the previous year's race, the race was 200 km (124 mi) longer, lacked a prologue, and had the same number of rest days and individual time trials. In addition, this race contained two more stages, as well as one more set of half stages. In Italy, the race was televised daily in thirty-minute segments at during the evening on the second channel of RAI.[19] The race, however, was still to be broadcast normally over radio.[19]

Upon the release of the route in March, La Stampa writer Gianni Pignata believed that the first leg of the split eleventh stage, to Il Cioccio, along with stages 20 and 21, which featured eight total climbs in the Dolomites, would be decisive in determining the race's winner.[14] Pignata believed this edition of the Giro d'Italia was geared towards climbers.[14] He added that if a rider wanted to best Merckx, he would need to make his move earlier in the race and not wait for the Dolomites, as Merckx would likely be in top form by then.[20] After looking over the race route, Italian rider Marino Basso stated that there were few opportunities for sprinters to try and win a stage.[14] Two-time winner Felice Gimondi felt the race started off hard and agreed with Pignata and Basso, in that the race favored climbers and lacked chances for sprint finishes.[21] He stated that the route suited the riding styles of Luis Ocaña, Eddy Merckx, and José Manuel Fuente.[21] In addition, Gimondi criticized Torriani for placing a rest day in after the third day of racing, stating that there was no justification for it there.[21]

Stage characteristics and results[3][18]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 16 May Vatican City (Vatican City) to Formia 164 km (102 mi) Plain stage  Wilfried Reybrouck (BEL)
2 17 May Formia to Pompei 121 km (75 mi) Plain stage  Patrick Sercu (BEL)
3 18 May Pompei to Sorrento 137 km (85 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
19 May Rest day
4 20 May Sorrento to Sapri 208 km (129 mi) Plain stage  Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)
5 21 May Sapri to Taranto 215 km (134 mi) Plain stage  Piermattia Gavazzi (ITA)
6 22 May Taranto to Foggia 206 km (128 mi) Plain stage  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
7 23 May Foggia to Chieti 257 km (160 mi) Plain stage  Ugo Colombo (ITA)
8 24 May Chieti to Macerata 150 km (93 mi) Plain stage  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
9 25 May Macerata to Carpegna 191 km (119 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
10 26 May Carpegna to Modena 205 km (127 mi) Plain stage  Patrick Sercu (BEL)
11a 27 May Modena to Il Ciocco 153 km (95 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
11b Il Ciocco to Forte dei Marmi 62 km (39 mi) Plain stage  Patrick Sercu (BEL)
12 28 May Forte dei Marmi to Forte dei Marmi 40 km (25 mi) Time Trial.svg Individual time trial  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
13 29 May Forte dei Marmi to Pietra Ligure 231 km (144 mi) Plain stage  Enrico Paolini (ITA)
14 30 May Pietra Ligure to Sanremo 189 km (117 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Giuseppe Perletto (ITA)
15 31 May Sanremo to Valenza 206 km (128 mi) Plain stage  Ercole Gualazzini (ITA)
1 June Rest day
16 2 June Valenza to Monte Generoso 158 km (98 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
17 3 June Como to Iseo 158 km (98 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Santiago Lazcano (ESP)
18 4 June Iseo to Sella Valsugana 190 km (118 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
19 5 June Borgo Valsugana to Pordenone 146 km (91 mi) Plain stage  Enrico Paolini (ITA)
20 6 June Pordenone to Tre Cime di Lavaredo 163 km (101 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
21 7 June Misurina to Bassano del Grappa 194 km (121 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
22 8 June Bassano del Grappa to Milan 257 km (160 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
Total 4,001 km (2,486 mi)

Race overview[edit]

The first day of racing was gearing up to finish with a bunch sprint, when neo-professional cyclist Wilfried Reybrouck attacked with 400 meters to go.[3] Reybrouck managed to hold off the chasing sprinters Roger De Vlaeminck and Marino Basso, among others to win the stage.[3] A strike had been rumored to happen on the race route near Naples, which caused the riders to stick together and not attack.[3] The pack of riders finished together, with Belgian Patrick Sercu taking the stage victory.[3] The third stage featured a late climb of Mount Faito, where José Manuel Fuente attacked ten kilometers from the summit and rode 25 kilometers solo to the finish.[22] Merckx, Baronchelli, Gimondi, Moser, and other general classification hopefuls remained behind and attacked each other within the group until the finish.[22] The group finished 33 seconds after Fuente, but Merckx, who had been dropped, lost 42 seconds to Fuente, along with some other riders.[22] Race leader Reybrouck lost the lead to Fuente upon finishing thirty minutes behind and ultimately being eliminated from the race because he finished outside the time limit.[22] This was the first time a rider had gone from leading the race to being disqualified after the next stage in the race's history.[22]

The following stage was interrupted 102 kilometers into the day for five minutes because of a strike conducted in response to a dam built.[23] Pierino Gavazzi won the first stage of his career upon beating the likes of De Vlaeminck and Franco Bitossi.[23] During the sprint, José Gonzales Linares and Jos Huysmans led out their teammates respective teammates Fuente and Merckx, but were found guilty of illegally boosting their teammates during the sprint.[23] The four riders were fined 50,000 lire each and relegated to 37th position on the stage.[23] The sixth leg had little action until the final twenty kilometers, when the headwinds picked up and splintered the peloton into several groups just hundreds of meters apart.[24] Giacinto Santambrogio made a move closer to the finish line and rode solo until Bitossi joined him.[24] Eventually Bitossi dropped Santambrogio and then held off the charging sprinters in order to win the day, which was his 100th career victory.[24]

Ugo Colombo won the race's seventh leg after telling race leader Fuente he was riding up the road to greet some family - as is custom - although none of his family lived anywhere near the region.[25] Colombo was allowed a maximum advantage of around thirteen minutes before the peloton closed the gap to within one minute.[25] The race for second place brought out the general classification contenders as there was a slight incline near the end of the stage.[25] In particular, Francesco Moser, Merckx, and De Vlaeminck attacked several times and Fuente could not counter, allowing the riders to gain seven seconds on the race lead.[25]

Doping[edit]

There were doping controls.[26]

Classification leadership[edit]

A picture of three mountain.
The Tre Cime di Lavaredo was the Cima Coppi for the 1974 running of the Giro d'Italia.

There were three main individual classifications contested in the 1974 Giro d'Italia, as well as a team competition. Three of them awarded jerseys to their leaders. The general classification was the most important and was calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage.[27] The rider with the lowest cumulative time was the winner of the general classification and was considered the overall winner of the Giro.[27] The rider leading the classification wore a pink jersey to signify the classification's leadership.[27]

The second classification was the points classification. Riders received points for finishing in the top positions in a stage finish, with first place getting the most points, and lower placings getting successively fewer points.[27] The rider leading this classification wore a purple (or cyclamen) jersey.[27] The mountains classification was the third classification and its leader was denoted by the green jersey. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Each climb was ranked as either first, second or third category, with more points available for higher category climbs. Most stages of the race included one or more categorized climbs, in which points were awarded to the riders that reached the summit first. The Cima Coppi, the race's highest point of elevation, awarded more points than the other first category climbs.[27] The Cima Coppi for this Giro was the Tre Cime di Lavaredo.[16][17] The first rider to cross the Tre Cime di Lavaredo was Spanish rider José Manuel Fuente.

The final classification, the team classification, awarded no jersey to its leaders. This was calculated by adding together points earned by each rider on the team during each stage through the intermediate sprints, the categorized climbs, stage finishes, etc. The team with the most points led the classification.[27]

There were other minor classifications within the race, including the neo-professional competition. The classification was determined in the same way as the general classification, but considering only neo-professional cyclists (in their first three years of professional racing).

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
Points classification
Mountains classification
1 Wilfried Reybrouck Wilfried Reybrouck Wilfried Reybrouck not awarded
2 Patrick Sercu Roger De Vlaeminck
3 José Manuel Fuente José Manuel Fuente José Manuel Fuente
4 Roger De Vlaeminck
5 Pierino Gavazzi
6 Franco Bitossi
7 Ugo Colombo
8 Franco Bitossi
9 José Manuel Fuente
10 Patrick Sercu
11a José Manuel Fuente
11b Patrick Sercu
12 Eddy Merckx
13 Enrico Paolini
14 Giuseppe Perletto Eddy Merckx
15 Ercole Gualazzini
16 José Manuel Fuente
17 Santiago Lazcano
18 Franco Bitossi
19 Enrico Paolini
20 José Manuel Fuente
21 Marino Basso
22 Gianni Motta
Final Eddy Merckx Roger De Vlaeminck José Manuel Fuente

Final standings[edit]

Legend
  Pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification   Green jersey   Denotes the winner of the Mountains classification
  Purple jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification

General classification[edit]

Final general classification (1–10)[1][2]
Rank Name Team Time
1  Eddy Merckx (BEL) Pink jersey Molteni 113h 08' 13"
2  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA) Scic + 12"
3  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Bianchi + 33"
4  Tino Conti (ITA) Zonca + 2' 14"
5  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) Green jersey KAS + 3' 22"
6  Giovanni Battaglin (ITA) Jolly Ceramica + 4' 22"
7  Francesco Moser (ITA) Filcas + 6' 17"
8  Vicente López Carril (ESP) KAS + 10' 28"
9  Franco Bitossi (ITA) Scic + 16' 05"
10  Gösta Pettersson (SWE) Magniflex + 17' 08"

Points classification[edit]

Final points classification (1–5)[1][28]
Rider Team Points
1  Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL) A purple jersey Brooklyn 295
2  Franco Bitossi (ITA) Scic 209
3  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) Green jersey KAS 171
4  Eddy Merckx (BEL) Pink jersey Molteni 161
5  Francesco Moser (ITA) Filcas 152

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification (1–10)[1][28][29]
Rider Team Points
1  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) Green jersey KAS 510
2  Eddy Merckx (BEL) Pink jersey Molteni 330
3  Santiago Lazcano (ESP) KAS 230
4  Giuseppe Perletto (ITA) Sammontana 160
5  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA) Scic 120
6  Tino Conti (ITA) Zonca 100
7  José-Luis Uribezubia (ESP) KAS 80
 Franco Bitossi (ITA) Scic
 Vicente López Carril (ESP) KAS
10  Gonzalo Aja (ESP) KAS 70

Neo-professional classification[edit]

Final neo-professional classification (1–5)[28]
Rider Team Time
1  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA) Scic 113h 08' 25"
2  Claudio Bortolotto (ITA) Filcas + 1h 19' 22"
3  Johann Ruch (GER) Rokado + 1h 26' 24"
4  Raphael Nino (ITA) Jolly Ceramica + 1h 28' 46"
5  Simone Fraccaro (ITA) Filcas + 1h 52' 48"

Traguardi tricolori classification[edit]

Final traguardi tricolori classification (1–5)[28]
Rider Team Points
1  Marcello Osler (ITA) Sammontana 210
2  Wilmo Francioni (ITA) Sammontana 100
3  Ercole Gualazzini (ITA) Brooklyn 80
4  Pietro Campagnari (ITA) Dreherforte 70
 Giuseppe Perletto (ITA) Sammontana
 Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL) A purple jersey Brooklyn

Team classification[edit]

Final team classification (1–5)[28]
Team Points
1 KAS 5,915
2 Brooklyn 5,151
3 Scic 3,821
4 Molteni 2,938
5 Jolly Ceramica 2,734

Aftermath[edit]

This victory in the race gave Merckx five career victories at the Giro d'Italia, equaling the record of Alfredo Binda and Fausto Coppi.[3] In July, Merckx entered the Tour de France.[30] He emerged victorious, winning eight stages en route to his fifth career Tour victory, again equaling the record for career Tour victories.[30][31] He won the Tour by a margin of eight minutes and four seconds over the second-place finisher and thus became the only cyclist to win the Giro and Tour in the same year three times in a career.[31] In August, he won the men's road race at the 1974 UCI Road World Championships and became the first rider to achieve the Triple Crown of Cycling, which consists of winning two Grand Tour races and the men's road race at the UCI Road World Championships in a calendar year.[32][33] For his career successes in the Giro d'Italia, Merckx became the first rider inducted into the race's Hall of Fame in 2012.[34][35] When being inducted, Merckx was given the modern-day trophy with the winners engraved until 1974, the last year he won the race.[34][35]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ a b c d "Quinto Triunfo de Merckx En El "Giro"" [Merck’s Fifth win in the "Tour"] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo S.A. 9 June 1974. p. 21. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 March 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Gino Sala (9 June 1974). "Con Merckx ha vinto anche Baronchelli" [With Merckx also won Baronchelli] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 16. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-03-13. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Bill and Carol McGann. "1974 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 2013-07-05. Retrieved 2012-07-10. 
  4. ^ a b Giuliano Califano (15 May 1974). "Una corsa che ritrova entusiasmo" [A race that finds enthusiasm]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 11. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c Giuliano Califano (14 May 1974). "A meta corsa vedrete Merckx" ["In mid-race you will see Merckx"]. Stampa Sera (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 11. Archived from the original on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Gianni Pignata (14 May 1974). "Se non ci fosse Merckx" [If there is no Merckx]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 17. Archived from the original on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  7. ^ Maurizio Caravella (15 May 1974). "E noi faremo di tutto perché si illogico" ["And we will do everything because it illogical"]. Stampa Sera (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 11. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  8. ^ "Hanno firmato i loro pronostici" [The signed their predictions] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 16 May 1974. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-07-02. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  9. ^ Gino Sala (16 May 1974). "La promessa di una grande corsa e di un nuovo ciclismo" [The promise of a great race and a new cycling] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-07-02. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-07-02. Retrieved 2015-07-02. 
  11. ^ Alfredo Giorgi (14 May 1974). "Ocana ha confermato il suo no al Giro d'Italia" [Ocana confirmed his opposition to the Tour of Italy]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 17. Archived from the original on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  12. ^ "Sport2" [Sport2]. Het Vrije Volk (in Dutch). 15 May 1974. p. 11. Retrieved 27 May 2017 – via Delpher. 
  13. ^ Maurizio Caravella (15 May 1974). "Eddy e fiducioso Felice perplesso". La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 21. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  14. ^ a b c d e Gianni Pignata (30 March 1974). "Giro italiano, una sorpresa" [Italian Giro, a surprise]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 21. Archived from the original on 18 May 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  15. ^ a b Gino Sala (30 March 1974). "Questo il <<Giro>> 1974" [This is the <<Tour>> 1974] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-05-16. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  16. ^ a b "Le Montagne" [The Mountains] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 30 March 1974. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-05-16. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  17. ^ a b c "Le 23 montagne e l'altimetria" [The 23 mountains and altitude] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 16 May 1974. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-03-13. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  18. ^ a b "Le 22 giornate di corsa" [The 22 days of racing] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 16 May 1974. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-03-13. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  19. ^ a b "Snobbato alla tv" [Snubbed on TV]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. 15 May 1974. p. 11. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  20. ^ Gianni Pignata (15 May 1974). "Fuente gia in fuga all'inizio" [Fuenta already beginning fleeing]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 11. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  21. ^ a b c Gianni Pignata (30 March 1974). "Duro l'inizio dice Gimondi" ["Tough start says Gimondi"]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 21. Archived from the original on 18 May 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  22. ^ a b c d e Gianni Pignata (19 May 1974). "Fuente da una scossa al Giro" [Fuente by a jolt at the Tour]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 19. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  23. ^ a b c d Gianni Pignata (22 May 1974). "Per Merckx e Fuente spinte proibite" [For Merckx and Fuente forbidden pushes]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. p. 19. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  24. ^ a b c Gianni Pignata (23 May 1974). "Solita volata: tocca a Bitossi". La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  25. ^ a b c d Gianni Pignata (24 May 1974). "La beffa di Colombo a Fuente" [The mockery of Colombo at Fuente]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  26. ^ "Nuovo metodo per scoprire i doping segreti dei ciclisti" [A new method to discover the secret doping of cyclists]. La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. 16 May 1974. p. 21. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  28. ^ a b c d e "Statistiche, episodi, curiosità, del Giro d'Italia di ieri e di oggi" [Statistics, episodes, curiosity, the Tour of Italy of yesterday and today] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 13 May 1975. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-03-31. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  29. ^ "Merckx, vencedor, y Fuenta, quinto clasificado" [Merckx, winner, and Fuenta fifth-placed] (PDF). Diari de Girona (in Catalan). Diari de Girona Media, S.L. 9 June 1974. p. 20. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  30. ^ a b Bill and Carol McGann. "1974 Tour de France". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 2012-07-10. 
  31. ^ a b "Clasificaciones oficiales" [Official classifications] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo S.A. 22 July 1974. p. 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 20 August 2011. 
  32. ^ "Merckx logro su tercer titulo mundial batiendo a Poulidor" [Merckx achieving his third world title beating Poulidor] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo S.A. 26 August 1974. p. 23. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 20 August 2011. 
  33. ^ Cycling News (16 March 2012). "Gallery: Eddy Merckx turns 70". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2015. 
  34. ^ a b VeloNews.com (15 March 2012). "Giro d'Italia Hall of Fame inducts Eddy Merckx as its first member". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 14 May 2014. 
  35. ^ a b Cycling News (16 March 2012). "Merckx inducted into Giro d'Italia Hall of Fame". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 26 June 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2013.