1979 College Baseball All-America Team

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1979 All-Americans included 5x MLB All-Star Tim Wallach.

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.[1]

From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.[2]

Key[edit]

Awarded the Golden Spikes Award as national Player of the Year[2]
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been named an All-American at that point
Inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame

All-Americans[edit]

Position Name School Notes
Pitcher Derek Tatsuno Hawaii 22 wins in a single season (1979) (T-Division I Record),[3] 234 strikeouts in a single season (1979) (Division I record),[3] 541 career strikeouts (2nd in Division I)[3]
Pitcher Jerry Don Gleaton Texas
Catcher Herb Orensky Delaware
First baseman Tim Wallach Cal State Fullerton 5x MLB All-Star,[4] 3x Gold Glove Award winner,[4] 2x Silver Slugger Award winner[4]
Second baseman Mike Gates Pepperdine
Third baseman Murphy Su'a BYU
Shortstop Randy Ingle Appalachian State
Outfielder Mark Seeger Northern Arizona
Outfielder Mike Kelley Mississippi State
Outfielder Rob Townley Long Beach State
Designated hitter Mark Strucher Georgia Southern

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Michigan alumnus. University of Michigan Library. 2010. p. 495. ASIN B0037HO8MY.
  2. ^ a b "NCAA Baseball Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  3. ^ a b c "Division I Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved 14 April 2012.
  4. ^ a b c "Tim Wallach". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 18 April 2012.