197 Arete

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197 Arete
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 21 May 1879
Designations
Pronunciation /əˈrt/ ə-REE-tee
Named after
Arete
1934 RE1 1950 DY
Asteroid belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.89 yr (50000 d)
Aphelion 3.1882283 AU (476.95216 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 2.2897600 AU (342.54322 Gm) (q)
2.7389941 AU (409.74769 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.1640143 (e)
4.53 yr (1655.7 d)
20.361539° (M)
0° 13m 2.744s / day (n)
Inclination 8.793773° (i)
81.607160° (Ω)
246.46589° (ω)
Earth MOID 1.29448 AU (193.651 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.16829 AU (324.372 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.314
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 29.18±2.4 km
6.6084 h (0.27535 d)[2]
6.54 h[4]
0.4417±0.083[2]
0.442[5]
S[6]
9.18[2]

197 Arete is an asteroid in the asteroid belt. It has a very bright surface, unusually bright even for a rocky S-type asteroid.

It was discovered by J. Palisa on May 21, 1879, and named after Arete, the mother of Nausicaa in Homer's The Odyssey.[7] Every 18 years, this asteroid approaches within 0.04 AU of 4 Vesta. During these encounters, Vesta causes a gravitational perturbation of Arete, allowing the mass of Vesta to be directly determined.[8]

Photometric observations during 1984 showed a rotation period of 6.54 ± 0.02 hours and a brightness variation of 0.10 ± 0.01 in magnitude. The light curve shows "four well defined extrema with two asymmetric maxima".[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/lists/NumberedMPs.html
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 197 Arete" (2011-07-02 last obs). Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  3. ^ "AstDys: 197 Arete". Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  4. ^ http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/lc.html
  5. ^ http://dorothy.as.arizona.edu/DSN/IRAS/index_iras.html
  6. ^ http://spiff.rit.edu/richmond/parallax/phot/LCSUMPUB.TXT
  7. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names. 1 (5th ed.). Berlin Heidelberg New York: Springer-Verlag. pp. 32–33. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. 
  8. ^ Hertz, Hans G. (April 19, 1968). "Mass of Vesta". Science. 160 (3825): 299–300. Bibcode:1968Sci...160..299H. doi:10.1126/science.160.3825.299. PMID 17788233. 
  9. ^ di Martino, M.; Zappala, V.; de Campos, J. A.; Debehogne, H.; Lagerkvist, C.-I. (September 1988), "Rotational properties and lightcurves of the minor planets 94, 107, 197, 201, 360, 451, 511 and 702", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series, 67 (1): 95–101, Bibcode:1987A&AS...67...95D. 

External links[edit]