1980 College Football All-America Team

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The 1980 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1980.

The NCAA recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1980 season.[1] They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP),[2] (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA),[3] and (4) the United Press International (UPI).[4] The AP, UPI, and FWAA teams were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Football News, a national weekly football publication, the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA),[5] The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).[6]

Fourteen players were unanimous picks by all four official selectors. Seven of the unanimous picks were offensive players: (1) South Carolina running back and 1980 Heisman Trophy winner, George Rogers; (2) Georgia running back and 1982 Heisman Trophy winner, Herschel Walker; (3) Purdue quarterback and 1980 Sammy Baugh Trophy winner, Mark Hermann; (4) Stanford wide receiver Ken Margerum; (5) Purdue tight end Dave Young; (6) Pittsburgh tackle Mark May; and (7) Notre Dame center John Scully. The seven unanimous picks on the defensive side were: (1) Pittsburgh defensive end Hugh Green, who won the 1980 Walter Camp Award, Maxwell Award, Lombardi Award, and Sporting News and UPI College Football Player of the Year awards; (2) Alabama defensive end E.J. Junior; (3) Houston defensive tackle Leonard Mitchell; (4) Baylor linebacker Mike Singletary; (5) North Carolina linebacker Lawrence Taylor; (6) UCLA defensive back Kenny Easley; and (7) USC defensive back Ronnie Lott.

In 1989, The New York Times published a follow-up on the 1980 AP All-America team. The article reported that 20 of the 22 first-team players went on to play in the NFL, with 13 still active and eight having received All-Pro honors.[7]

Offensive selections[edit]

Wide receivers[edit]

Tight ends[edit]

  • Dave Young, Purdue (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, TSN, WC)
  • Marvin Harvey, Southern Mississippi (NEA-1)
  • Clay Brown, Brigham Young (AP-3, UPI-2)
  • Benjie Pryor, Pitt (AP-2)
  • Rodney Holman, Tulane (NEA-2)

Tackles[edit]

  • Mark May, Pittsburgh (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-2 [guard], TSN, WC)
  • Keith Van Horne, USC (AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN)
  • Nick Eyre, BYU (AFCA, AP-3, FWAA, UPI-2 [guard], NEA-1)
  • Bill Dugan, Penn St. (AFCA, AP-3)
  • Ken Lanier, Florida State (AP-2)
  • Curt Marsh, Washington (NEA-2)

Guards[edit]

  • Randy Schleusener, Nebraska (AP-1, UPI-1, NEA-1, WC)
  • Louis Oubre, Oklahoma (AFCA, AP-2 [tackle], FWAA, UPI-2 [tackle], NEA-2 [tackle], WC)
  • Ron Wooten, North Carolina (AP-3, UPI-2, NEA-1, WC)
  • Roy Foster, USC (UPI-1, NEA-2)
  • Frank Ditta, Baylor (AP-1)
  • Billy Ard, Wake Forest (TSN)
  • Terry Crouch, Oklahoma (TSN)
  • Sean Farrell, Penn State (AP-2)
  • Joe Lukens, Ohio State (AP-2)
  • Howard Richards, Missouri (UPI-2)
  • Frank McCallister, Navy (AP-3)

Centers[edit]

Quarterbacks[edit]

  • Mark Herrmann, Purdue (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA [tie], AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, WC)
  • Jim McMahon, BYU (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA [tie], AP-2, UPI-2)
  • Art Schlichter, Ohio State (NEA-1)
  • John Elway, Stanford (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-3, NEA-2, TSN)

Running backs[edit]

Defensive selections[edit]

Defensive ends[edit]

  • Hugh Green, Pittsburgh (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • E.J. Junior, Alabama (AFCA, AP-1 [linebacker], FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Scott Zettek, Notre Dame (AP-1)
  • Derrie Nelson, Nebraska (AP-2, FWAA, UPI-2, NEA-2)
  • Don Blackmon, Tulsa (AP-2)
  • Lyman White, LSU (NEA-2)
  • Rich Dixon, California (AP-3)
  • Ricky Jackson, Pittsburgh (AP-3, UPI-2)

Defensive tackles[edit]

Middle guards[edit]

  • Ron Simmons, Florida State (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, UPI-1, WC)
  • Jim Burt, Miami (Fla.) (NEA-1)
  • Stan Gardner, Kansas (UPI-2)
  • Hosea Taylor, Houston (NEA-2)

Linebackers[edit]

Defensive backs[edit]

Special teams[edit]

Kickers[edit]

Punters[edit]

Key[edit]

  • Bold – Consensus All-American[1]
  • -1 – First-team selection
  • -2 – Second-team selection
  • -3 – Third-team selection

Official selectors[edit]

Unofficial selectors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. pp. 3, 7. Retrieved February 10, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Green, Easley All-American". The Pantagraph. December 3, 1980. p. B3. 
  3. ^ a b Ted Gangi (ed.). "FWAA All-America Since 1944: The All-Time Team" (PDF). Retrieved October 5, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "1980 UPI A-A Team". The Daily News (Huntingdon, PA). December 5, 1980. p. 6. 
  5. ^ a b Murray Olderman (December 2, 1980). "NEA's 1980 All-America football team". The Daily News (Huntingdon, PA). p. 5. 
  6. ^ a b "Walter Camp Foundation All-American Teams". Archived from the original on 2009-05-04. Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  7. ^ John Nelson (September 3, 1989). "980 AP All-America Team--a Decade Later". The New York Times.