1980 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s
Years: 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1980:

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August 7 – Janice Brown pilots the MacCready Gossamer Penguin on its first solar-powered flight.
  • August 10 – A man who had arrived in the United States from Cuba as a refugee during the Mariel boatlift earlier in the year hijacks Air Florida Flight 4 – a Boeing 737 with 35 people on board flying from Miami to Key West, Florida – claiming to have a bomb and forces it to fly him to Havana, Cuba, where he surrenders to Cuban authorities. His "bomb" turns out to be a bar of soap packed in a box.[48][49]
  • August 11 – The construction of São Paulo–Guarulhos International Airport in São Paulo, Brazil, begins.
  • August 13 – Complaining that they had been unable to find jobs in the United States, seven man who had arrived in the United States from Cuba as refugees during the Mariel boatlift earlier in the year hijack Air Florida Flight 707 – a Boeing 737 with 74 people on board flying from Key West to Miami, Florida – splashing gasoline (petrol) on the floor and threatening to ignite it. They force it to fly to Havana, Cuba, where they surrender to Cuban authorities.[50][49][51] Thirty-nine-year-old passenger Martin Thomas makes his second unplanned trip to Havana in three days; he also had been aboard Air Florida Flight 4 when it was hijacked three days earlier.[51]
  • August 14
    • Two Spanish-speaking men armed with a bottle of what appears to be gasoline (petrol) hijack National Airlines Flight 872 – a Douglas DC-10 with 224 people on board flying from Miami, Florida, to San Juan, Puerto Rico – and force it to fly them to Havana, Cuba, where they surrender to Cuban authorities. After four hours on the ground in Havana, the DC-10 takes off early on August 15 and continues its flight to San Juan.[52][49]
    • Representatives of 17 airlines meet with officials of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, and the Public Safety Department of Dade County, Florida, to discuss ways of addressing the new wave of airliner hijackings from the United States to Cuba, which began on June 12, 1979. The renewed use of "behavioral profiles" to identify hijackers based on their personalities and behaviors is among the options they consider.[49]
  • August 16 – A record three hijackings of U.S. airliners take place on the same day. First, six Latin men threatening to ignite a fluid they said was explosive commandeer Eastern Air Lines Flight 90, a Boeing 727 with 53 people on board flying from Miami to Orlando, Florida. Later in the afternoon, four Latin men armed with bottles they say contain inflammable liquids take control of Republic Airlines Flight 228, a Douglas DC-9 with 116 people on board flying from Miami to Orlando. A half-hour after that, three Latin men threaten to ignite four containers they say contain gasoline (petrol) aboard Delta Air Lines Flight 1065, a Lockheed L-1011 Tristar with 183 people on board flying from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Miami. All three airliners divert to Havana, Cuba, where Cuban authorities arrest all of the hijackers.[53][54][55][56][57] In addition, two men armed with bottles containing gasoline are arrested at Miami International Airport in Miami while trying to board an Air Florida flight to Key West.[56][57] Finally, a homesick Cuban refugee arrives at Miami International Airport displaying $200 in cash and asking for help in purchasing a plane ticket to Cuba, but leaves by taxi disappointed when he is informed that there are no flights from the United States to Cuba.[56] Sky marshals have begun flying aboard airliners flying to and from airports in South Florida during the weeken of August 16-17 to combat the wave of hijackings to Cuba.[56]
  • August 18 – A hijacker commandeers Eastern Air Lines Flight 348 – a Douglas DC-9 with 59 people on board flying from Melbourne, Florida, to Atlanta, Georgia – demanding ransom money and to be flown Cuba. Police storm the airliner at Atlanta and arrest the hijacker.[58]
  • August 19 – A fire breaks out in the aft cargo compartment of Saudia Flight 163, a Lockheed L-1011-200 TriStar, a few minutes after takeoff from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The plane returns to the airport and makes a safe emergency landing, but instead of ordering an immediate emergency evacuation, the flight crew taxis onto a taxiway before stopping. Engine shutdown takes another 3 minutes 15 seconds, by which time all or most of the passengers and crew apparently have been overcome by smoke and fire. By the time airport emergency personnel get one of the plane's doors open 23 minutes after engine shutdown, all 301 people on board have died. It remains the second-deadliest single-aircraft accident in history, the deadliest in Saudi Arabian history, and the deadliest involving an L-1011.
  • August 26
  • August 28–31 – The 3rd FAI World Rally Flying Championship is held in Aschaffenburg, West Germany. Individual winners are 1. Witold Świadek / Andrzej Korzeniowski (Poland), 2. Otto Höfling / Michael Amtmann (West Germany), 3. Luckerbauer / Meszaros (Austria). Team results are 1. Poland, 2. West Germany, 3. Austria.
  • August 29 – As passengers board Braniff International Airways Flight 920 – a Douglas DC-8 flying from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to Los Angeles, California – during a refueling stop at Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, Peru, Cuban refugees break windows in the airport terminal, rush onto the tarmac, and storm the plane, demanding to be flown to the United States. Although Peruvian Civil Guard officers fire shots in the air and prevent some refugees from boarding, 168 refugees join 17 passengers on board the airliner, and about another 150 refugees mill around outside the plane. With no crew aboard the DC-8 to fly it anywhere, negotiations result in the refugees surrendering to the Peruvian authorities. Two refugees suffer minor gunshot wounds during the incident when Civil Guard officers fire at them, and other refugees are cut by broken glass while breaking windows in the terminal.[61][62]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

First flights[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Entered service[edit]

January[edit]

October[edit]

  • The MD-80 series enters airline service.

November[edit]

December[edit]

Retirements[edit]

References[edit]

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  4. ^ Associated Press, "HIJACKER OF PLANE IS SEIZED IN SICILY," nytimes.com, September 26, 1982.
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  11. ^ Cordesman, Anthony H., and Abraham R. Wagner, The Lessons of Modern War, Volume II: The Iran-Iraq War, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1990, ISBN 0-8133-1330-9, p. 34.
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  13. ^ "135 survive plane crash". The Telegraph. 27 February 1980. Retrieved 1 June 2011. 
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  22. ^ Anonymous, "Hijacker Arrested in Cuba," The Stanford Daily, April 10, 1980.
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  26. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica
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  39. ^ Anonymous, "Soviet Jetliner Crashes; At Least 163 Are Killed," Sarasota Herald-Tribune, July 18, 1980, Page 5-A.
  40. ^ Anonymous, "163 Reported Dead in Soviet Jet Crash," The Bulletin (Bend, Oregon), July 17, 1980, Page 8.
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  42. ^ Today in History for July 11, 2016
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  46. ^ United Press International, "Jetliner Hijacked," The Daily Iowan, July 23, 1980, p. 2.
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  49. ^ a b c d New York Times News Service, "223 Aboard U.S. Jet Hijacked to Havana," Chicago Tribune, August 15, 1980, p. 5.
  50. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  51. ^ a b Anonymous, "It's a Regular Cuba Shuttle," Chicago Tribune, August 15, 1980, p. 5.
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  56. ^ a b c d Thames, Rick, "$1 Million Bond on Skyjack Suspects," Miami News, August 18, 1980, Page 1A.
  57. ^ a b Omang, Joanne, "Three Jetliners Hijacked to Cuba," washingtonpost.com, August 17, 1980.
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  62. ^ Moore, Marilyn A., and Ken Szymkowiak, "150 Cuban Refugees Storm Jet in Peru, Demand Flight to U.S.," Miami News, August 29, 1980, Page 1A.
  63. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  64. ^ Associated Press, "Apparent Homesick Refugee Hijacks Eastern Jet to Cuba," The Cornell Daily Sun, September 9, 1980, p. 8.
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  67. ^ Ovalle, David, "Man accused of hijack to Cuba in '80 arrested," Miami Herald, August 16, 2002.
  68. ^ Simpson, Doug, "Cuban gets 10 years for 1980 hijacking of flight in New Orleans," Associated Press, Tuesday, March 11, 2003, 6:00 p.m.
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  72. ^ Cordesman and Wagner, p. 30.
  73. ^ "B-26 crash at Biggin Hill". 
  74. ^ Cordesman and Wagner, pp. 34, 64, 69–70, 81.
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  76. ^ Cordesman and Wagner, pp. 82. 84, 98.
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  78. ^ Cordesman and Wagner, p. 103.
  79. ^ "Republic Airlines takes over Hughest Airwest on Oct. 1". Deseret News. UPI. September 18, 1980. p. 10B. 
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  89. ^ Cordesman and Wagner, p. 100.
  90. ^ planecrashinfo.com Famous People Who Died in Aviation Accidents: 1980s
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