1982 in British television

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List of years in British television (table)

This is a list of British television related events from 1982.

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • February – The first-ever 3D broadcast in the UK is screened by Television South. The programme includes excerpts of test footage shot by Philips in the Netherlands. Red/green 3D glasses were given away free with copies of the TVTimes listings magazine, but the 3D sections of the programme were shown in monochrome.

March[edit]

  • 5 March – The BBC is given permission by the Government to start broadcasting television programmes on two satellite channels from early 1986.[6] Ultimately, however, the channels were not launched.
  • 28 March – The British television premiere of the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me on ITV.[7]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August – Test broadcasts commence for Channel 4 and S4C. These mainly consist of showing the IBA's testcard ETP-1.

September[edit]

  • 20 September – The first showing of BBC Schools' first computer generated ident takes place.

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

  • 2 December – 10.2 million viewers saw a classic comedy scene from the Only Fools and Horses episode "A Touch of Glass" in which the Trotters accidentally smash a priceless chandelier.
  • 23 December – Service Information is broadcast on BBC2 for the final time.
  • 26 December – Premiere of Raymond Briggs' The Snowman on Channel 4.[20]
  • 27 December –
  • December – ITV conducts a national 3D experiment, with red/blue glasses allowing colour 3D to be shown for the first time. The programme, an episode of the weekly science magazine The Real World (produced by TVS) is shown on a weekday evening, and repeated that weekend on Sunday afternoon, followed by a rare screening of the Western Fort Ti starring George Montgomery and Joan Vohs.

Debuts[edit]

BBC1[edit]

BBC2[edit]

ITV[edit]

Channel 4[edit]

S4C[edit]

New channels[edit]

Date Channel
26 April Satellite Television
1 November S4C
2 November Channel 4

Television shows[edit]

Changes of network affiliation[edit]

Show Moved from Moved to
Rising Damp ITV Channel 4

1920s[edit]

  • BBC Wimbledon (1927–present)

1930s[edit]

  • BBC Cricket (1939–1999, 2020–2024)

1940s[edit]

1950s[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

Ending this year[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Date Name Age Cinematic Credibility
21 March Harry H. Corbett 57 actor (Steptoe and Son)
15 April Arthur Lowe 66 actor (Dad's Army, Coronation Street)
12 July Kenneth More 67 actor
4 November Talfryn Thomas 60 actor (Dad's Army)
16 November Arthur Askey 82 comedian
2 December Marty Feldman 48 comedian and actor (At Last the 1948 Show, Marty)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter Fiddick "ITV's framework for survival in the eighties", The Guardian; 25 January 1980; p.2
  2. ^ ITV's framework for survival in the eighties: Expectations of a harsh ... The Guardian (1959–2003); 25 January 1980;
  3. ^ £5m for staff who seek TV franchise. By Kenneth Gosling. The Times, Monday, 12 May 1980;
  4. ^ "2001: A Space Odyssey – BBC One London – 1 January 1982 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  5. ^ "Larry Grayson's Generation Game – BBC One London – 3 January 1982". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  6. ^ "On This Day – March 5, 1982". London: Times Online. 5 March 2004. Retrieved 6 June 2009.
  7. ^ a b "James Bond On TV – Movies". MI6 – The Home Of James Bond 007. 5 April 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  8. ^ a b Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 978-0-14-102715-9.
  9. ^ Beaumont, Ian. "Sky One". Transdiffusion Broadcasting System. Archived from the original on 2009-07-19. Retrieved 23 April 2009.
  10. ^ "Dynasty – BBC One London – 1 May 1982 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  11. ^ "London's Marathon – BBC One – 9 May 1982". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  12. ^ "International Athletics – BBC One – 29 March 1981". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  13. ^ "BBC One London – 20 June 1982 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  14. ^ "BBC One London – 3 October 1982 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  15. ^ Midgley, Neil (16 January 2013). "Breakfast television: the revolution embraced by the nation". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 27 February 2019.
  16. ^ "Film of the Week: Lord of the Flies – BBC Two England – 17 October 1982 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  17. ^ a b "25 facts from Channel 4's 25 years". BBC News. 2 November 2007. Retrieved 23 April 2009.
  18. ^ "BFI Screenonline: P'tang, Yang, Kipperbang (1982)". www.screenonline.org.uk. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  19. ^ a b "Part One (1982–1992): "Suddenly The Refrigerator Was a Bigger Name Than Gary Lineker" : Off The Telly". Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  20. ^ a b c "1982 : Off The Telly". Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  21. ^ BFI.org.uk (episode capsule)
  22. ^ "News in Brief" The Times (London, England), Thursday, 16 Dec 1982; pg. 3;