1983 Winston 500

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1983 Winston 500
Race details[1]
Race 8 of 30 in the 1983 NASCAR Winston Cup Series season
Layout of Talladega Superspeedway
Layout of Talladega Superspeedway
Date May 1, 1983 (1983-May-01)
Official name Winston 500
Location Alabama International Motor Speedway, Talladega, Alabama
Course Permanent racing facility
2.660 mi (4.280 km)
Distance 188 laps, 500.1 mi (804.8 km)
Weather Warm with temperatures approaching 84.9 °F (29.4 °C); wind speeds up to 11.8 miles per hour (19.0 km/h)
Average speed 153.936 miles per hour (247.736 km/h)
Attendance 110,000[2]
Pole position
Driver Ranier Racing
Most laps led
Driver Richard Petty Petty Enterprises
Laps 52
Winner
No. 43 Richard Petty Petty Enterprises
Television in the United States
Network NBC
Announcers Paul Page
Gary Gerould
Johnny Rutherford
Radio in the United States
Radio MRN
Booth Announcers Barney Hall
Mike Joy
Turn Announcers Eli Gold (1 & 2)
Dave DeSpain (Backstretch)
Dave Sutherland (3 & 4)

The 1983 Winston 500 was a NASCAR Winston Cup Series event that took place on May 1, 1983, at Alabama International Motor Speedway (now Talladega Superspeedway) in Talladega, Alabama.

Background[edit]

Talladega Superspeedway, originally known as Alabama International Motor Superspeedway (AIMS), is a motorsports complex located north of Talladega, Alabama. It is located on the former Anniston Air Force Base in the small city of Lincoln. The track is a Tri-oval and was constructed by International Speedway Corporation, a business controlled by the France Family, in the 1960s. Talladega is most known for its steep banking and the unique location of the start/finish line - located just past the exit to pit road. The track currently hosts the NASCAR series such as the Monster Energy Cup Series, Xfinity Series, and the Camping World Truck Series. Talladega Superspeedway is the longest NASCAR oval with a length of 2.66 miles (4.28 km), and the track at its peak had a seating capacity of 175,000 spectators.[3]

Qualifying[edit]

Qualifying results[edit]

Pos No. Driver Team Manufacturer Speed
1
2 98 Joe Ruttman Benfield Racing Chevrolet
3 88 Geoff Bodine
4 3 Ricky Rudd Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet
5 75 Neil Bonnett RahMoc Enterprises Chevrolet
6 9 Bill Elliott Melling Racing Ford 200.318
7 44 Terry Labonte Hagan Racing Chevrolet
8
9
10 1 Lake Speed Ellington Racing Chevrolet 198.479
11
12 55 Benny Parsons Johnny Hayes Racing Buick 198.076
13
14
15 43 Richard Petty Petty Enterprises Pontiac 197.488
16
17
18 7 Kyle Petty Petty Enterprises Pontiac
19 22 Bobby Allison DiGard Motorsports Buick
20 90 Dick Brooks Donlavey Racing Ford
21 33 Harry Gant Mach 1 Racing Buick 196.338
22
23
24
25
26
27
28 24 Cecil Gordon Chrysler
29
30
31 64 Tommy Gale Langley Racing Ford
32 71 Dave Marcis Marcis Auto Racing Chevrolet
33
34
35
36 77 Ken Ragan Branch-Ragan Racing Buick
37
38
39 99 Philip Duffie Duffie Racing Buick
40 67 Buddy Arrington Arrington Racing Chrysler
41 52 Jimmy Means Means Racing Buick
42 41 Ronnie Thomas Thomas Racing Pontiac

Race[edit]

Before the restrictor plates dramatically slowed down the cars, the restarts were considered to be fast and furious at what is now known as Talladega Superspeedway.[4] There were 42 American-born drivers on the grid, representing manufacturers including Pontiac, Buick, Chevrolet, and Ford. Cale Yarborough qualified for the pole position with a speed of 202.650 miles per hour (326.134 km/h). Richard Petty defeated Benny Parsons by two car lengths after three hours and fourteen minutes to earn his 197th career win.[2] Seven cautions for 42 laps were witnessed by 110,000 spectators in addition to 27 different lead changes.[2] The average speed of the race was 153.936 miles per hour (247.736 km/h).[2] There was a major incident involving Phil Parsons and ten other drivers.[5] Two photographers managed to get Parsons out of the wreck before the vehicle exploded.[6] The entire race purse was $361,820 ($910,171.33 when adjusted for inflation).[7]

Dale Earnhardt was driving a Ford Thunderbird; an unexpected deviation from the Earnhardt family's Chevrolet heritage.[4] Lowell Cowell would retire from NASCAR after this race.

Race results[edit]

Pos Grid No. Driver Team Manufacturer Laps Points
1 15 43 Richard Petty Petty Enterprises Pontiac 188 185
2 12 55 Benny Parsons Johnny Hayes Racing Buick 188 175
3 10 1 Lake Speed Ellington Racing Chevrolet 188 170
4 21 33 Harry Gant Mach 1 Racing Buick 188 165
5 6 9 Bill Elliott Melling Racing Ford 188 160
6 7 44 Terry Labonte Chevrolet
7 41 52 Jimmy Means Buick
8 Ricky Rudd
9 Dave Marcis
10 Bobby Allison
11 Joe Ruttman
12 Ken Ragan
13 Tommy Gale
14 Dick Brooks
15 Neil Bonnett
16 Cecil Gordon
17 Morgan Shepherd
18 Dean Roper
19 Lennie Pond
20 Ron Bouchard
21 Geoff Bodine
22 Steve Moore
23 Buddy Arrington
24 Dale Earnhardt
25 Buddy Baker
26 Lowell Cowell
27 Tim Richmond
28 9 66 Phil Parsons
29 Cale Yarborough
30 18 7 Kyle Petty Petty Enterprises Pontiac 71 73
31 David Pearson
32 Jody Ridley
33 Darrell Waltrip
34 A.J. Foyt
35 Ronnie Thomas
36 Mark Martin
37 Rick Wilson
38 Philip Duffie
39 26 10 Clark Dwyer Hamby Motorsports Chevrolet 30 46
40 33 4 Connie Saylor Morgan-McClure Motorsports Oldsmobile 22 43
41 22 17 Sterling Marlin (R) Hamby Motorsports Pontiac 20 40
42 35 96 Rick Baldwin Buick 7 37

Race summary[edit]

  • Lead changes: 27 among different drivers
  • Cautions/Laps: 7 for 43
  • Red flags: 0
  • Time of race: 3 hours, 14 minutes and 55 seconds
  • Average speed: 153.936 miles per hour (247.736 km/h)

Media[edit]

Television[edit]

The television coverage of this race (on NBC) was more serious than today's broadcasts; telling people about the dangers of driving constantly at 185 miles per hour (298 km/h).[4] Using the crude technology that was invested into driver safety back then, drivers had plenty of courage to complete the entire race.[4] Only after Dale Earnhardt's death would NASCAR start to improve their safety standards; leading up to the introduction of the Car of Tomorrow.

NBC Television
Booth announcers Pit reporters
Lap-by-lap: Paul Page
Color-commentator: Gary Gerould
Color-commentator: Johnny Rutherford

Radio[edit]

MRN Radio
Booth announcers Turn announcers Pit reporters
Lead announcer: Barney Hall
Announcer: Mike Joy
Turns 1 & 2: Eli Gold
Backstretch: Dave DeSpain
Turns 3 & 4: Dave Sutherland
Ned Jarrett
Jerry Punch

Standings after the race[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1983 Winston 500 weather information". The Old Farmers' Almanac. Retrieved 26 June 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e "1983 Winston 500". Racing-Reference. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  3. ^ "Track Facts". talladegasuperspeedway.com. Talladega Superspeedway. November 1, 2012. Archived from the original on November 1, 2012. Retrieved April 27, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d "1983 Winston 500". Wheels of Speed. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  5. ^ "1983 Winston 500". How Stuff Works. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  6. ^ "1983 Winston 500". Front Stretch. Archived from the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  7. ^ "1983 Winston 500". Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
Preceded by
1983 Virginia National Bank 500
NASCAR Winston Cup Series Season
1983
Succeeded by
1983 Marty Robbins 420
Preceded by
1983 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500
Richard Petty's Career Wins
1960-1984
Succeeded by
1983 Miller High Life 500
Preceded by
1982
Winston 500 races
1983
Succeeded by
1984