1984–85 South Pacific cyclone season

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1984–85 South Pacific cyclone season
1984-1985 South Pacific cyclone season summary.jpg
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formed December 26, 1984
Last system dissipated March 20, 1985
Strongest storm
Name Hina
 • Maximum winds 220 km/h (140 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure 910 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions 9
Tropical cyclones 9
Severe tropical cyclones 5
Total fatalities Unknown
Total damage Unknown
South Pacific tropical cyclone seasons
1982–83, 1983–84, 1984-85, 1985–86, 1986–87

The 1984–85 South Pacific cyclone season was a near normal tropical cyclone season, with nine tropical cyclones occurring within the basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season ran from November 1, 1984, to April 30, 1985, with tropical cyclones officially monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) and New Zealand's MetService. The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and other national meteorological services including Météo-France and NOAA also monitored the basin during the season. During the season there was nine tropical cyclones occurring within the basin, including three that moved into the basin from the Australian region. The BoM, MetService and RSMC Nadi all estimated sustained wind speeds over a period of 10-minutes, which are subsequently compared to the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale, while the JTWC estimated sustained winds over a 1-minute period, which are subsequently compared to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS).

Seasonal summary[edit]

Tropical cyclone scales#South Pacific

During November and December no significant tropical cyclones developed in or moved into the basin in the region,

Systems[edit]

Unnamed Tropical Cyclone[edit]

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
07P Dec 28 1984 0404Z.png 07P 1984 track.png
Duration December 26 – December 28
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  987 hPa (mbar)

An unnamed tropical cyclone existed from December 26 to December 28.

Tropical Cyclone Monica[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Monica Dec 29 1984 0331Z.png Monica 1984 track.png
Duration December 28 – January 3
Peak intensity 110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  975 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Monica existed from December 29 to December 30.

Tropical Cyclone Drena[edit]

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Drena Jan 12 1985 0243Z.png Drena 1985 track.png
Duration January 9 – January 16
Peak intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  987 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Drena existed from January 9 to January 16.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Eric[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Eric Jan 17 1985 0457Z.png Eric 1985 track.png
Duration January 13 – January 20
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  955 hPa (mbar)

On January 13, TCWC Nadi started to monitor a shallow depression that had developed within the monsoon trough about 725 km (450 mi) to the west of Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu.[1] Over the next day the system moved eastwards and developed further as gale-force winds developed near the systems centre before the JTWC initiated advisories on the system and designated it as Tropical Cyclone 11P during January 14.[1][2] The system was subsequently named Eric by TCWC Nadi as it moved closer to Espiritu Santo and became equivalent to a category 1 tropical cyclone.[1][3] During January 15, Eric passed near or over Espiritu Santo, as it continued to intensify before it turned and accelerated south-eastwards.[1] Eric subsequently became equivalent to a category 3 severe tropical cyclone early the next day, before an Air Pacific flight from Fiji to the Solomon Islands located the systems eye on radar.[1]

During January 17, Eric's well defined eye came into the range of Nadi airports surveillance radar, before TCWC Nadi estimated that Eric had peaked with 10-minute sustained wind-speeds of 150 km/h (90 mph).[1][3] During that day Eric's eye seemed to contract to around 15 km (10 mi) as it made passed through Fiji's Western Division and made landfall on the Fijian main island of Viti Levu about 10 km (5 mi) to the south of Nadi.[1] After the system had made landfall, the JTWC estimated that Eric had peaked with 1-minute sustained wind speeds of 185 km/h (115 mph), which made it equivalent to a category 3 hurricane on the SSHWS.[4] The system subsequently passed near or over Fiji's capital: Suva before emerging into the Korro Sea and weakening. Eric subsequently passed through the Tonga's Ha'apai islands just to the south of Nomuka during January 18, before it gradually weakened and was last noted during January 20, over 1,800 km (1,120 mi) to the south of Papeete, French Polynesia.[3][4]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Nigel[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Nigel Jan 19 1985 0310Z.png Nigel 1985 track.png
Duration January 16 – January 28
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  955 hPa (mbar)

Late on January 16, Tropical Cyclone Nigel moved into the South Pacific basin from the Australian region. During the next day the system continued to move eastwards and developed an eye, before it became equivalent to a modern-day category 3 severe tropical cyclone.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Odette[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Odette Jan 20 1985 0300Z.png Odette 1985 track.png
Duration January 19 – January 21
Peak intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (10-min)  960 hPa (mbar)

At around 1300 UTC on January 19, Severe Tropical Cyclone Odette moved into the South Pacific Basin from the Australian Region.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Freda[edit]

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Freda Jan 28 1985 0131Z.png Freda 1985 track.png
Duration January 25 – January 30
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  955 hPa (mbar)

Severe Tropical Cyclone Freda existed from January 26 to January 30.

Tropical Cyclone Gavin[edit]

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Gavin Mar 7 1985 0000Z.png Gavin 1985 track.png
Duration March 2 – March 9
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  985 hPa (mbar)

Gavin caused widespread flooding within the western division of Fiji, with seven people killed as a result.[5]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Hina[edit]

Category 5 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Hina Mar 16 1985 0319Z.png Hina 1985 track.png
Duration March 11 – March 20
Peak intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (10-min)  910 hPa (mbar)

One of the most intense tropical cyclones in the basin.

Season effects[edit]

This table lists all the storms that developed in the South Pacific basin during the 1984–85 season. It includes their intensity on the Australian Tropical cyclone intensity scale, duration, name, areas affected, deaths, and damages. For most storms the data is taken from RSMC Nadi's and or TCWC Wellington's archives, however data for 03P has been taken from the JTWC/NPMOC archives as opposed to RSMC Nadi's or TCWC Wellington's, and thus the winds are over 1-minute as opposed to 10-minutes.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Unnamed December 26 – 28 Category 1 tropical cyclone 85 km/h (50 mph) 987 hPa (29.14 inHg) None None
Monica December 28 – January 3 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) New Caledonia None None
Drena January 9 – 16 Category 1 tropical cyclone 85 km/h (50 mph) 987 hPa (29.14 inHg)
Eric January 14 – 20 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Vanautu, Fiji, Tonga 40 million 27 [5]
Nigel January 16 – 28 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Vanautu, Fiji, Tonga
Odette January 19 – 21 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) Vanautu Minor None
Freda January 25 – 30 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg)
Gavin March 2 – 9 Category 2 tropical cyclone 95 km/h (60 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) 7
Hina March 11 – 20 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 220 km/h (140 mph) 910 hPa (26.88 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji 3
Season aggregates
9 systems December 26 – March 20 220 km/h (140 mph) 910 hPa (26.88 inHg) 40 million 37

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g DeAngellis, Richard M, ed. (1985). Hurricane Alley: Tropical Cyclones — January 1985 (Mariners Weather Log: Volume 29: Issue 3: Summer 1985). United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. pp. 170–174. ISSN 0025-3367. OCLC 648466886. 
  2. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center; Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (1986). Annual Tropical Cyclone Report: 1985 (PDF) (Report). United States Navy, United States Air Force. Retrieved October 28, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c MetService (May 22, 2009). "TCWC Wellington Best Track Data 1967–2006". International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship. 
  4. ^ a b Joint Typhoon Warning Center; Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (January 19, 2012). "Tropical Cyclone 11P (Eric) best track analysis". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Summary of Major Disasters in Fiji 1985 – March 2010" (PDF). Fiji National disaster management office. 2010-10-10. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 

External links[edit]