1984 MTV Video Music Awards

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1984 MTV Video Music Awards
1984-mtv-vma-logo.png
DateFriday, September 14, 1984
LocationRadio City Music Hall, New York, New York
CountryUnited States
Hosted byDan Aykroyd and Bette Midler
Most awardsHerbie Hancock (5)
Most nominationsCyndi Lauper (9)
Television/radio coverage
NetworkMTV

The 1984 MTV Video Music Awards aired live on September 14, 1984, honoring the best music videos from May 2, 1983, to May 2, 1984.[1] The show was hosted by Dan Aykroyd and Bette Midler at the Radio City Music Hall in New York City.[2]

Herbie Hancock was the night's biggest winner, taking home five awards, followed by Michael Jackson, who won three.[3] The night's main award, Video of the Year, went to The Cars for "You Might Think".[4] This was the first of only a few instances in the show's history where the video of the year did not win any other awards.

In terms of nominations, Hancock's "Rockit" and The Police's "Every Breath You Take" were the most nominated videos, receiving eight nominations apiece.[5][6] Cyndi Lauper was the most nominated artist of the night, with nine nods overall for two of her videos: six for "Girls Just Want to Have Fun", which eventually won the Best Female Video Moonman, and three for "Time After Time".[6][7]

Other major nominees included the aforementioned Jackson and The Cars, both of whom received six nominations each for their videos "Thriller" and "You Might Think" respectively;[8][6] ZZ Top, who also received six nominations between their videos for "Legs", "Sharp Dressed Man", and "Gimme All Your Lovin'";[6] and Billy Idol, who garnered five nominations for "Dancing with Myself" and "Eyes Without a Face".[7] Lastly, David Bowie earned four nominations for his "China Girl" and "Modern Love" videos,[6] and was also one of the night's honorees for the Video Vanguard award.[4]

Nominations[edit]

Winners are in bold text.[9]

Video of the Year Best Male Video

The Cars – "You Might Think"[10]

David Bowie – "China Girl"[10]

Best Female Video Best Group Video

Cyndi Lauper – "Girls Just Want to Have Fun"[11]

ZZ Top – "Legs"[12]

Best New Artist in a Video Best Concept Video

Eurythmics – "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)"[13]

Herbie Hancock – "Rockit"[14]

Most Experimental Video Best Stage Performance in a Video

Herbie Hancock – "Rockit"[5]

Van Halen – "Jump"[15]

Best Overall Performance in a Video Best Direction in a Video

Michael Jackson – "Thriller"[11]

ZZ Top – "Sharp Dressed Man" (Director: Tim Newman)[16]

Best Choreography in a Video Best Special Effects in a Video

Michael Jackson – "Thriller" (Choreographers: Michael Jackson and Michael Peters)[17]

Herbie Hancock – "Rockit" (Special Effects: Godley & Creme)[18]

Best Art Direction in a Video Best Editing in a Video

Herbie Hancock – "Rockit" (Art Directors: Jim Whiting and Godley & Creme)[18]

Herbie Hancock – "Rockit" (Editors: Roo Aiken and Godley & Creme)[18]

Best Cinematography in a Video Viewer's Choice

The Police – "Every Breath You Take" (Director of Photography: Daniel Pearl)[19]

Michael Jackson – "Thriller"[10]

Video Vanguard Award[20]
The Beatles
David Bowie
Richard Lester
Special Recognition Award[4]
Quincy Jones

Performances[edit]

List of musical performances
Artist(s) Song(s) Ref
Rod Stewart "Infatuation" [21]
Madonna "Like a Virgin" [22]
Huey Lewis and the News "I Want a New Drug" [21]
David Bowie "Blue Jean" [23]
Tina Turner "What's Love Got to Do with It" [21]
ZZ Top "Sharp Dressed Man" [22]
Ray Parker, Jr. "Ghostbusters" [21]

Madonna's performance of "Like a Virgin" has been referred to as one of the most "unforgettable" and "iconic" moments in both pop culture and VMA history for the singer's fashion and her "provocative moves".[24][25][26][27] She emerged from a 17-foot tall wedding cake wearing a "racy", "risque" see-through wedding dress and bustier, with a silver belt buckle that read "BOY TOY".[28][29] While descending the steps of the cake, one of her high heeled shoes slipped off, prompting her to dive to the floor and roll around to cover up the wardrobe malfunction.[30] Her attempt to retrieve the shoe inadvertently led to her flashing her underwear on live television.[29] Madonna later told Billboard after the incident, "So I thought, 'Well, I'll just pretend I meant to do this,' and I dove onto the floor and I rolled around".[30]

Appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dessem, Matthew (August 27, 2019). ""Coronation Ceremonies for the Goon Generation": Here's How Critics Reviewed the First MTV Video Music Awards". Slate. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved October 8, 2020. After all, the only videos eligible were those that had played on MTV between May 2, 1983 and May 2, 1984.
  2. ^ a b Edelstein, Andy (August 12, 2016). "MTV VMAs first show in 1984: A look back". Newsday. Archived from the original on August 13, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  3. ^ Higgins, Bill (August 23, 2013). "MTV Execs Remember the First VMAs". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 23, 2013. Retrieved October 14, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c Sanchez, Omar (August 15, 2018). "Hollywood Flashback: Madonna Rolled Around Onstage, The Cars Topped Michael Jackson at First VMAs". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 15, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Wendell, Eric (2018). "Chapter 7: A Video Star Is Born". Experiencing Herbie Hancock: A Listener's Companion. United States: Rowman & Littlefield (published August 10, 2018). p. 128. ISBN 9781442258389. Later that year, "Rockit" was nominated for eight awards at the first annual MTV Video Music Awards, ultimately winning five including Best Concept Video and Most Experimental Video.
  6. ^ a b c d e Spotnitz, Frank (August 12, 2016). "The first annual MTV Music Awards opened in Radio..." UPI. Archived from the original on October 11, 2020. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  7. ^ a b Stern, Claire (August 26, 2016). "#FlashbackFriday: See What the Stars Wore to the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards". InStyle. Archived from the original on September 21, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Mantzouranis, Tom (August 28, 2015). "The Inside Story Of How The First MTV VMAs Created A Tradition Of Making Censors Sweat". UPROXX. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "VMA Archive 1984". MTV. March 1, 2000. Archived from the original on March 1, 2000. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Whatley, Jack (July 15, 2020). "David Bowie rocks the first-ever VMAs in 1984 with 'Blue Jean'". Far Out Magazine. Archived from the original on September 11, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Goodman, Jessica (August 25, 2015). "First VMAs in GIFs from 1984". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 14, 2017. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  12. ^ a b c Black, Elizabeth (August 25, 2016). "A Look Back At The First Ever MTV VMAs: Bette Midler & Dan Aykroyd Co-Hosted, Herbie Hancock Swept The Awards". VH1. Archived from the original on August 31, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  13. ^ Morgan, Chris (August 27, 2015). "Exploring The Good, Bad, And Very Ugly Of MTV's 'Best New Artist' Award". UPROXX. Archived from the original on January 19, 2016. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  14. ^ Wunech, Kevin (July 19, 2013). "Herbie Hancock's 'RockIt' was a U.S. radio dud in the '80s". Tampa Bay Times. Archived from the original on October 8, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  15. ^ Singh, Olivia (March 17, 2020). "The top boy band song from the year you were born". The Insider. Archived from the original on October 13, 2020. Retrieved October 12, 2020.
  16. ^ Daniels, Neil (January 1, 2014). "Chapter 15: ZZ Top's Enduring Legacy – Selective List of Awards". Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers: A ZZ Top Guide. United Kingdom: Soundcheck Books. p. 183. ISBN 9780957144279. They also won an MTV Video Music Award for Best Direction for "Sharp Dressed Man" in 1984.
  17. ^ Chang, Rachel (October 31, 2019). "Michael Jackson: Behind the Scenes of His Iconic 'Thriller' Music Video". Biography.com. Archived from the original on November 4, 2019. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  18. ^ a b c d Terry, Ken (September 17, 1984). "Hancock's 'Rockit' Tops MTV Vid Awards". Variety. New York. p. 7. ISSN 0042-2738. Archived from the original on October 11, 2020. Retrieved October 11, 2020.
  19. ^ Kutner, Jon; Leigh, Spencer (2005). "522 The Police Every Breath You Take". 1,000 UK Number One Hits. United Kingdom: Omnibus Press (published May 26, 2010). ISBN 9780857123602. 'Every Breath You Take' was the first single released from the final studio album, Synchronici-ty... At the inaugural MTV Music Video Awards in 1984, it also won Best Cinematography Award.
  20. ^ Melas, Chloe (August 11, 2016). "Rihanna to accept Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award at MTV VMAs". CNN. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  21. ^ a b c d Blackwood, Nina; Goodman, Mark; Hunter, Alan; Quinn, Martha; Edwards, Gavin (May 7, 2013). "Chapter 35: What A Pity You Don't Understand / The VJs Versus MTV Management". VJ: The Unplugged Adventures of MTV's First Wave. United States: Simon & Schuster. p. 230. ISBN 9781451678123.
  22. ^ a b Gemmill, Allie (August 27, 2016). "The First VMAs Was So Very '80s". Bustle. Archived from the original on July 31, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  23. ^ Greene, Andy (June 30, 2020). "Flashback: David Bowie Plays 'Blue Jean' at Inaugural VMAs in 1984". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on June 30, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  24. ^ Reid, Joe; O'Keefe, Kevin; Li, Shirley (August 22, 2014). "A Definitive Ranking of Every MTV Video Music Awards Ceremony". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  25. ^ Schnurr, Samantha (August 24, 2019). "A History of Every Unforgettable Moment From the MTV Video Music Awards". E! Online. Archived from the original on August 25, 2019. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  26. ^ Ulaby, Neda; Tyler-Ameen, Daoud (August 20, 2018). "'Like A Virgin' Lives On, A Winking Anthem For Women Getting Married". NPR. Archived from the original on August 20, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  27. ^ Mullen, Matt (June 11, 2019). "Madonna's Now-Famous 'Like a Virgin' Performance Was Thanks to a Wardrobe Malfunction". Biography.com. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  28. ^ "MTV VMA Fashions". CBS News. August 26, 2003. Archived from the original on October 8, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  29. ^ a b c "Madonna's wild VMA moment". Entertainment Weekly. August 27, 2002. Archived from the original on April 5, 2015. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  30. ^ a b Tannenbaum, Rob (October 28, 2014). "The Real Story Behind Madonna's Iconic 'Like a Virgin' Performance at the 1984 VMAs". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 31, 2014. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  31. ^ a b Masley, Ed (August 23, 2014). "MTV Video Music Awards: 30 memorable moments through the years". AZ Central. Archived from the original on October 11, 2020. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  32. ^ Johnson Jr., Billy (March 26, 2014). "Missing You: 10 Heartfelt Diana Ross and Michael Jackson Moments". Yahoo Entertainment – Music News. Archived from the original on June 14, 2019. Retrieved October 12, 2020. Note: See #8
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "MTV Video Music Awards, The First Annual (TV)". Paley Center. Archived from the original on October 20, 2020. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  34. ^ MTV Music Awards (Television production). United States: MTV. September 14, 1984. Event occurs at 54:58.
  35. ^ MTV Music Awards (Television production). United States: MTV. September 14, 1984. Event occurs at 1:19:02.

External links[edit]