1984 Washington Huskies football team

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1984 Washington Huskies football
University of Washington Block W logo.svg
National champions
Orange Bowl champion
Orange Bowl, W 28–17 vs. Oklahoma
Conference Pacific-10
Ranking
Coaches No. 2
AP No. 2
1984 record 11–1 (6–1 Pac-10)
Head coach Don James (10th year)
Offensive coordinator Gary Pinkel
Defensive coordinator Jim Lambright
MVP Ron Holmes
Captain Dan Eernissee, Danny Greene, Tim Meamber, Jim Rogers
Home stadium Husky Stadium
Seasons
« 1983 1985 »
1984 Pacific-10 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#10 USC $ 7 1 0     9 3 0
#2 Washington 6 1 0     11 1 0
#9 UCLA 5 2 0     9 3 0
Arizona 5 2 0     7 4 0
Washington State 4 3 0     6 5 0
Arizona State 3 4 0     5 6 0
Oregon 3 5 0     6 5 0
Stanford 3 5 0     5 6 0
Oregon State 1 7 0     2 9 0
California 1 8 0     2 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1984 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its tenth season under head coach Don James, the team compiled an 11–1 record, was ranked #2 in the final Coaches and AP polls, and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 352 to 145.[1] Ron Holmes was selected as the team's most valuable player. Dan Eernissee, Danny Greene, Tim Meamber, Jim Rogers were the team captains.

NCAA-deemed "Major Selectors"[2]:107 of Clyde Berryman (QPRS), Football News, and National Championship Foundation (NCF), each selected Washington as their national champion, with NCF splitting its selection with BYU.[2]:113

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 8 Northwestern* No. 19 Husky StadiumSeattle, WA W 26–0   55,364
September 15 at No. 3 Michigan* No. 16 Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 20–11   103,072
September 22 Houston* No. 9 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 35–7   61,045
September 29 Miami (Ohio)* No. 6 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 53–7   56,900
October 6 at Oregon State No. 3 Parker StadiumCorvallis, OR W 19–7   40,000
October 13 at Stanford No. 2 Stanford StadiumStanford, CA W 37–15   44,500
October 20 Oregon No. 1 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 17–10   58,088
October 27 Arizona No. 1 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 28–12   59,876
November 3 California No. 1 Husky Stadium • Seattle, WA W 44–14   59,462
November 10 at No. 14 USC No. 1 Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA L 7–16   71,838
November 17 at Washington State No. 8 Martin StadiumPullman, WA (Apple Cup) W 38–29   40,000
January 1 vs. No. 2 Oklahoma* No. 4 Miami Orange BowlMiami, FL (Orange Bowl) W 28–17   56,294
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Washington Yearly Results (1980–1984)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved December 14, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b 2016 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2016. Retrieved August 24, 2016.