1986 WAFL season

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1986 WAFL season
Teams 8
Premiers Subiaco
(6th premiership)
Minor premiers Subiaco
(7th minor premiership)
Matches played 88
Attendance 731,709 (8,315 per match)
Bernie Naylor Medallist Mick Rea (Perth)
Sandover Medallist Mark Bairstow (South Fremantle)
1985
1987

The 1986 WAFL season was the 102nd season of the various incarnations of the West Australian Football League. It was the last season before the introduction of the West Coast Eagles in the VFL which would relegate the WAFL to a second level league from 1987, and already all WAFL clubs were in severe financial difficulties[1] as attendances were stagnant at best since 1970 and the financial power of wealthy VFL clubs drew most top players away and left below-market transfer fees[2] as WAFL clubs’ inadequate main income source.

There was also controversy over an attempt to play the Round 7 match between West Perth and Claremont on Mother’s Day (11 May) which was vigorously opposed by young families, and the game was played on the Saturday,[3] and the WAFL admitted mid-season that changes to its schedules with more matches in major rural centres and matches at night at the WACA[a] were needed to counter the competition’s dwindling appeal.[4] WAFL chairman Roy Annear initially proposed to play two games a season in large towns like Geraldton, Bunbury and Kalgoorlie,[4] although in modern times games in rural areas have been spread out to smaller centres at a lower frequency.

On the field, 1986 saw financially crippled Perth,[5] whose reserves had in 1985 made the Demons’ first finals appearance in any grade since 1978,[6][7] build upon this under Mal Brown to reach the preliminary final. The loss of players to the VFL, however, prevented Perth building upon this in subsequent seasons and they have remained almost continuously a cellar-dweller since. East Fremantle and Subiaco, clearly the best teams in 1985, were even more dominant in 1986, though there was an unexpected end when hot favourites East Fremantle were thrashed in the Grand Final. Claremont, disappointing in 1984 and 1985, were spectacular early in 1986 before injuries to key players and form lapses saw a catastrophic fall from second with seven straight defeats.[8]

Swan Districts, who had achieve a mini-dynasty from 1980 to 1984 with 88 wins from 118 matches, declined from third to their fourteenth wooden spoon, as injuries to key players and loss of form by veteran Kevin Taylor[9][10] could only rarely be covered. South Fremantle, possessing the severest financial problems in the WAFL, also suffered from clouds over Don Haddow’s coaching future[11] and disputes with the Fremantle Council over Fremantle Oval producing proposals the Bulldogs move to a multi-sport stadium in Cockburn.[12] The Bulldogs suffered their worst season since 1972 and held no opponent under 100 points until the closing round.

Clubs[edit]

Club Coach Captain Best and fairest Leading goalkicker
Claremont Graham Moss Steve Malaxos Darrell Panizza John Scott (72)
East Fremantle Ron Alexander Brian Peake Paul Harding Colin Waterson (64)
East Perth Greg Brehaut (sacked after Round 7)
Gerard McNeill
Kevin Bryant (retired after Round 10)
Russell Sparks
Craig Starcevich Phil Bradmore (40)
Perth Mal Brown Robert Wiley Robert Wiley Mick Rea (90)
South Fremantle Don Haddow Mark Bairstow Mark Bairstow Craig Edwards (52)
Subiaco Haydn Bunton, Jr. Neil Taylor Laurie Keene Stephen Sells (74)
Swan Districts John Todd Don Langsford Peter Sartori Don Holmes (37)
West Perth John Wynne Les Fong Dan Foley Dan Foley (46)

Home-and-away Season[edit]

Round 1 (Easter Weekend)[edit]

Round 1
Saturday, 29 March Perth 13.15 (93) drew with West Perth 13.15 (93) Lathlain Park (crowd: 8121) [13]
Saturday, 29 March East Fremantle 12.11 (83) def. by Subiaco 18.9 (117) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 10118) [14]
Monday, 31 March East Perth 22.12 (144) def. by Swan Districts 21.20 (146) Perth Oval (crowd: 10405)
Monday, 31 March Claremont 33.18 (216) def. South Fremantle 10.9 (69) Claremont Oval (crowd: 7855)
  • Swan Districts’ comeback from 52 points behind at half-time to win was a WA(N)FL record and equaled Collingwood’s 1970 record against St. Kilda.[15] Former East Fremantle rover Kevin Taylor led the Swans‘ comeback with 25 kicks, 13 marks and 5.4 (34).[16]
  • Claremont recorded their highest score and biggest win over South Fremantle,[17] as the Tigers’ brilliant centreline led by the returning Steve Malaxos decimated the Bulldogs.[18]

Round 2[edit]

Round 2
Saturday, 5 April Subiaco 28.20 (188) def. East Perth 11.7 (73) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8818) [19]
Saturday, 5 April Swan Districts 17.12 (114) def. by Claremont 22.12 (144) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 9614)
Saturday, 5 April West Perth 17.17 (119) def. by East Fremantle 18.17 (125) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8824) [20]
Sunday, 6 April Perth 18.13 (121) def. South Fremantle 15.19 (109) Rushton Park (crowd: 7147)
  • Eight goals from John Scott – who had played most of 1985 at full-back – gave Claremont a second strong victory to suggest a Tigers rebound from a poor 1985.[21]
  • Subiaco, by scoring 12.4 (76) to 1.1 (7), achieved the largest margin at quarter-time in open-age WA(N)FL football, though it was beaten in the underage 1944 season.[22]
  • For the first time, the WAFL played a match at Rushton Park, Mandurah – from 1997 to become the home of ninth Westar Rules/WAFL club Peel Thunder.

Round 3[edit]

Round 3
Saturday, 12 April South Fremantle 22.17 (149) def. West Perth 20.10 (130) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6827) [23]
Saturday, 12 April Subiaco 26.21 (177) def. Perth 16.14 (110) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8430)
Saturday, 12 April Claremont 20.17 (137) def. by East Perth 21.14 (140) Claremont Oval (crowd: 6021)
Saturday, 12 April Swan Districts 14.16 (100) def. by East Fremantle 26.16 (172) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 7807)
  • Despite eight goals from Rea and the loss of Phil Scott before the game and Neil Taylor after quarter-time, Subiaco’s ability to rove to the Demon rucks gave them a convincing victory.[24]
  • East Perth narrowly avoided a second fadeout defeat as they nearly failed to hold onto a 51-point lead during the middle of the second quarter, thanks to veteran Kevin Bryant’s steadiness.[25]

Round 4[edit]

Round 4
Saturday, 19 April West Perth 20.16 (136) def. Swan Districts 15.12 (102) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8203) [26]
Saturday, 19 April Subiaco 26.13 (169) def. South Fremantle 18.21 (129) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8571)
Saturday, 19 April Perth 20.8 (128) def. Claremont 14.12 (96) Lathlain Park (crowd: 6477) [27]
Saturday, 19 April East Perth 20.13 (133) def. by East Fremantle 24.5 (149) Perth Oval (crowd: 6988) [28]

After having won only 27 matches between 1980 and 1985, Perth claimed a prized scalp as they exploited Claremont’s weakness at centre half-forward, whilst Craig Smith added to his reputation as a WAFL “tagger” by shutting down Malaxos.[5]

Round 5 (Anzac Day)[edit]

Round 5
Friday, 25 April West Perth 14.17 (101) def. by East Perth 15.18 (108) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 17529)
Saturday, 26 April Perth 22.8 (140) def. Swan Districts 21.13 (139) Lathlain Park (crowd: 7659)
Saturday, 26 April Claremont 18.17 (125) def. Subiaco 9.15 (69) Claremont Oval (crowd: 9050)
Saturday, 26 April East Fremantle 27.15 (177) def. South Fremantle 16.21 (117) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 11005)
  • Despite losing their two top rovers, East Perth, with deputy rover Keith Wynne scoring 5.2 (32) and Starcevich controlling the ruck, hold the initiative for three quarters despite six goals from Dan Foley – four in a third quarter when West Perth looked like running away with the match.[29]
  • 9.2 (56) from Chris Stainowsky allows Perth to come back from 44 points behind to a thrilling victory, after Swan Districts played almost flawless football in the first half.[30]
  • Claremont’s gamble to play David O‘Connell at centre half-forward due to the suspension of Scott and concede a ruck advantage to Subiaco paid off as the fleet-footed Mitchell, Peter Davidson and Panizza ran Subiaco off their feet on the ball and O‘Connell kicked five goals to end the Lions’ unbeaten record.[31]

Round 6[edit]

Round 6
Saturday, 3 May West Perth 17.6 (108) def. by Subiaco 25.20 (170) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8217)
Saturday, 3 May South Fremantle 10.9 (69) def. by Swan Districts 25.15 (165) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6174) [11]
Saturday, 3 May Perth 18.17 (125) def. East Perth 15.12 (102) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8215)
Saturday, 3 May Claremont 21.14 (140) def. East Fremantle 12.11 (83) Claremont Oval (crowd: 8505)
  • Perth, kept in the match by unheralded wingmen Joe Sanostefano and Glen Moir, came back to run over the Royals as their forward trio of Rea, Ryder and Stasinowsky took charge with seven last-quarter goals between them.[32]
  • Another brilliant display by Malaxos and Mitchell drove Claremont to an outstanding victory, showing their Subiaco victory as no fluke. At one point Mitchell, being treated by a trainer for a calf injury, ran off and made a handball that produced a goal with the next kick.[33]

Round 7[edit]

Round 7
Saturday, 10 May Swan Districts 16.10 (106) def. by Subiaco 16.13 (109) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 7390)
Saturday, 10 May East Perth 15.18 (108) def. by South Fremantle 17.25 (127) Perth Oval (crowd: 4622) [34]
Saturday, 10 May West Perth 20.11 (131) def. Claremont 19.14 (128) Leederville Oval (crowd: 5885)
Saturday, 10 May East Fremantle 26.16 (172) def. Perth 12.9 (81) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7112) [35]
  • Peter Sartori at centre half-forward leads a nine-goal last quarter that nearly produces a remarkable comeback before Warren Dean kicks the winner for Subiaco with thirty seconds remaining.[36]
  • In a last quarter that ran thirty-eight minutes, after veteran George Michalczyk was carried from the field because of a concussion. West Perth came back to steal the match with 7.4 (46) to 0.3 (3) as the Bewick brothers, Foley, Greg Evans, Peter Menaglio and John Gastev suddenly slipped into action as Claremont stopped to a walk.[37]

Round 8[edit]

Round 8
Saturday, 17 May West Perth 19.11 (125) def. Perth 14.17 (101) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6993) [38]
Saturday, 17 May Swan Districts 23.21 (159) def. East Perth 12.12 (84) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 8081)
Saturday, 17 May South Fremantle 9.12 (66) def. by Claremont 25.17 (167) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5920) [39]
Saturday, 17 May Subiaco 21.11 (137) def. East Fremantle 16.16 (112) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 11640) [40]
  • A second win for Subiaco over their 1985 conquerors was marred by the investigation of Shark rover David Bushell for pushing Subiaco trainer Barry Winzer. It was not reported by any umpire, but Winzer suffered major injuries to his cheek, left knee, chest and neck and Bushell was suspended for five matches on 28 May.[41]
  • The return from injury of veteran strongman Garry Sidebottom allowed Swan Districts to form a combination reminiscent of their 1982/83/84 premiership days, as he and Holmes combined for fourteen goals, leaving Swans six points from fourth with a strong percentage.[42]

Round 9[edit]

Round 9
Saturday, 24 May Perth 23.15 (153) def. South Fremantle 15.14 (104) Leederville Oval (crowd: 5928) [43]
Saturday, 24 May East Perth 10.18 (78) def. by Subiaco 23.15 (153) Perth Oval (crowd: 6158) [44]
Saturday, 24 May Claremont 16.32 (128) def. Swan Districts 9.10 (64) Claremont Oval (crowd: 10298)
Saturday, 24 May East Fremantle 21.20 (146) def. West Perth 10.18 (78) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7142) [45]

Claremont’s 32 behinds was the most in a match at Claremont Oval,[46] but it was the Tiger defence led by Guy McKenna, Larry Kickett and Geoff Miles that dominated, holding a powerful Swan attack to 2.5 (17) in the first half in perfect conditions.[10]

Round 10 (Foundation Day)[edit]

Round 10
Saturday, 31 May Swan Districts 15.15 (105) def. by Perth 21.18 (144) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 10218) [47]
Saturday, 31 May West Perth 22.18 (150) def. East Perth 14.13 (97) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8127) [48]
Monday, 2 June Subiaco 14.26 (110) def. Claremont 7.20 (62) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 21088)
Monday, 2 June South Fremantle 8.10 (58) def. by East Fremantle 23.14 (152) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9275) [49]
  • Superb tagging of Malaxos and Mitchell permitted the Lions to hold Claremont to ten behinds in the second half, as the return of Scott forced Tiger forward David O‘Connell away from centre half-forward.[50]
  • East Fremantle recorded its biggest open-age victory over its derby rivals,[b] surpassing a 90-point margin from 1934.[51]

Round 11[edit]

Round 11
Saturday, 7 June West Perth 20.16 (136) def. Swan Districts 19.13 (127) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8294)
Saturday, 7 June South Fremantle 12.9 (81) def. by Subiaco 25.14 (164) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4320)
Saturday, 7 June Claremont 23.13 (151) def. Perth 14.16 (100) Claremont Oval (crowd: 7670)
Saturday, 7 June East Perth 15.13 (103) def. by East Fremantle 24.19 (163) Perth Oval (crowd: 4880) [52]
  • Without Rea and with the previously problematic Tiger attack back at its best, Perth suffered a convincing defeat despite being only seven points behind late in the second quarter.[53]
  • An unexpected move of Paul Mifka onto Sartori at half-time saved West Perth from a loss that would have looked embarrassing later, as he matched the big Swan’s mobility whilst Phil Bradmore dominated at the other end.[54]

Round 12[edit]

Round 12
Saturday, 14 June West Perth 17.14 (116) def. South Fremantle 16.14 (110) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4130)
Saturday, 14 June Perth 15.13 (103) def. by Subiaco 19.12 (126) Lathlain Park (crowd: 4771) [55]
Saturday, 14 June East Perth 11.13 (79) def. by Claremont 19.11 (125) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4295)
Saturday, 14 June East Fremantle 21.15 (141) def. Swan Districts 14.13 (97) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4519) [56]

South Fremantle produced their best effort to date, with Edwards and Bairstow outstanding – but a third-quarter lapse allowed the Falcons to win and enter the four for the first time in 1986.[57]

Round 13[edit]

Round 13
Saturday, 21 June Subiaco 27.18 (180) def. Swan Districts 12.8 (80) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 8002) [58]
Saturday, 21 June South Fremantle 15.16 (106) def. East Perth 14.17 (101) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4781) [59]
Saturday, 21 June Claremont 13.26 (104) def. by West Perth 16.13 (109) Claremont Oval (crowd: 8807)
Saturday, 21 June Perth 19.10 (124) def. East Fremantle 12.14 (86) Lathlain Park (crowd: 7218)
  • Perth ended a sequence of nineteen consecutive scores over 100 by East Fremantle against them, the most such consecutive scores by one club against another.[60] The Demons’ feeling they could upset the depleted Sharks – without Brennan and Neesham as well as Bushell – was justified as the Sharks were never in the hunt apart from a third-quarter burst.[61]
  • West Perth again won a thriller over the Tigers – this time holding on after scoring 7.5 (47) 0.3 (3) in thirty minutes centres around three-quarter time.[62] Derek Kickett and Goulding both scored 1.5 (11) for the inaccurate Tigers, who lost Steve Malaxos to a knee injury for the rest of the home-and-away season.

Round 14[edit]

Round 14
Saturday, 28 June Swan Districts 16.20 (116) def. South Fremantle 12.13 (85) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3861) [63]
Saturday, 28 June East Perth 17.14 (116) def. by Perth 20.14 (134) Perth Oval (crowd: 4212) [64]
Saturday, 28 June East Fremantle 12.18 (90) def. by Claremont 16.18 (114) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6414)
Sunday, 29 June Subiaco 14.15 (99) def. West Perth 7.11 (53) Kalgoorlie (crowd: 7139) [65]
  • Claremont’s ability to absorb East Fremantle’s physical pressure ensured it takes second position from the Sharks, whose play possessed courage but no planning or method.[66]
  • Superb displays by Brian Taylor, Laurie Keene and the Lions’ defence, plus five goals by Phil Scott, placed Subiaco four wins clear at the top, and left West Perth a game from fourth.
  • This was the first WAFL match in Kalgoorlie, and the attendance, given the showery weather during travel to the game by rail,[67] was higher than any previous figure for a football match in rural WA and produced a gate of $30,500, or $3,500 higher than the WAFL target.[68]

Round 15[edit]

Round 15
Saturday, 5 July Perth 20.18 (138) def. West Perth 6.15 (51) Lathlain Park (crowd: 9031)
Saturday, 5 July East Perth 17.20 (122) def. Swan Districts 13.6 (84) Perth Oval (crowd: 4837) [69]
Saturday, 12 July Claremont 15.12 (102) def. South Fremantle 12.17 (89) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5630) [70]
Saturday, 12 July East Fremantle 17.13 (115) def. Subiaco 14.16 (100) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 10298)
  • Despite Perth coach Brown being charged with misconduct, the Demons crushed West Perth in slippery conditions[71] to be temporarily second as Wiley – in the unfamiliar role of centreman – plus Barich and Santostefano took advantage of the Falcons’ lack of commitment.[72]
  • East Perth end a sequence of twenty games conceding over 100 points, which broke Perth’s previous record of nineteen in 1982 and 1983, and still stands.[73]
  • Subiaco’s run of eight wins ended on a violently windy afternoon as the Lions were not able to goal against the wind until sixteen minutes into the final quarter, whilst Peake – after his State-of-Origin heroics at full-forward – and Waterson scored eleven between them.[74]

State of Origin Match[edit]

Western Australia vs Victoria
Tuesday, 8 July (1:45 pm) Western Australia def. Victoria Subiaco Oval (crowd: 39863) [75]
4.4 (28)
9.5 (59)
15.10 (100)
21.11 (137)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Final
4.5 (29)
7.7 (49)
12.10 (82)
20.14 (134)
Umpires: Johnson (WA), Castle (VIC)
Simpson Medal: Brad Hardie
Television broadcast: ABC1
Peake 7.2
Buckenara 5.2
MacNish 3.1
Rioli 2.1
Michael Mitchell 2.0
Baker, Wilson 1.1
Blackwell, Hardie 0.1
Goals 5.4 Weightman
5.2 Royal
4.2 Taylor
3.1 Brereton
1.0 Alvin, Bews, Healy

This match has often been regarded as the greatest State of Origin match ever played.[76]

Round 16[edit]

Round 16
Saturday, 19 July South Fremantle 23.15 (153) def. Perth 19.10 (124) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5202) [77]
Saturday, 19 July Subiaco 13.22 (100) def. East Perth 12.8 (80) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6711) [78]
Saturday, 19 July Swan Districts 17.9 (111) def. Claremont 16.11 (107) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4995)
Saturday, 19 July West Perth 9.13 (67) def. by East Fremantle 15.17 (107) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6680)

Returns to form by Taylor and Kimberley alloed Swans to grasp an exciting last-minute victory after having been fifteen points behind with ten minutes remaining in an always-close match.[79]

Round 17[edit]

Round 17
Saturday, 26 July Perth 20.16 (136) def. Swan Districts 20.14 (134) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6011)
Saturday, 26 July East Perth 14.12 (96) def. West Perth 11.6 (72) Perth Oval (crowd: 6111) [80]
Saturday, 26 July Claremont 13.10 (88) def. by Subiaco 13.22 (100) Claremont Oval (crowd: 8504)
Saturday, 26 July East Fremantle 29.21 (195) def. South Fremantle 9.5 (59) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 8622) [81]
  • 33 kicks, sixteen handballs and four goals by Gerard Neesham was regarded as the finest individual performance of the season, and led East Fremantle to a second record open-age win over South.[b] Darren Bennett, in his first match for 1986, kicked five goals.
  • Veteran Wiley, who had shown superb skills tackling and in attack, denied lowly Swan Districts a late victory in a brilliant match via an amazing low smother where he dived onto a boot, and then a similar tackle on a Swan defender to allow a crucial goal.[82]

Round 18[edit]

Round 18
Saturday, 2 August West Perth 22.16 (148) def. Swan Districts 15.15 (105) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4915) [83]
Saturday, 2 August South Fremantle 17.13 (115) def. Subiaco 15.15 (105) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4559)
Saturday, 2 August Perth 22.20 (152) def. Claremont 16.11 (107) Lathlain Park (crowd: 7502) [84]
Saturday, 2 August East Perth 17.11 (113) def. by East Fremantle 21.16 (142) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5435)

South Fremantle provided a huge upset to move off the bottom as the brilliant Bairstow and erratic Winmar (who had been in the reserves during June) plus a surprisingly solid defence held the Lions out all afternoon.[85]

Round 19[edit]

Round 19
Saturday, 9 August South Fremantle 24.18 (162) def. West Perth 16.11 (107) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5872) [86]
Saturday, 9 August Subiaco 11.18 (84) def. by Perth 21.10 (136) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 9802)
Saturday, 9 August Claremont 14.10 (94) def. by East Perth 22.11 (143) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5190)
Saturday, 9 August Swan Districts 13.16 (94) def. by East Fremantle 26.15 (171) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5444) [87]
  • Rea’s power and Ryder’s pure speed exploited deficiencies in Subiaco’s armour as the Lions did not run hard enough to compete without key defenders Wilkinson and Crutchfield.[88]
  • A 12.3 (75) third quarter – East Perth’s highest single-quarter score since 1974 – gave the Royals an easy win over a disappointing Claremont, for whom only 30-kick Daniel Panizza played to potential.[89]

Round 20[edit]

Round 20
Saturday, 16 August Swan Districts 12.14 (86) def. by Subiaco 22.22 (154) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 5244)
Saturday, 16 August East Perth 21.18 (144) def. South Fremantle 13.8 (86) Perth Oval (crowd: 6850) [90]
Saturday, 16 August West Perth 18.24 (132) def. Claremont 12.11 (83) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6922[91])
Saturday, 16 August East Fremantle 24.16 (160) def. Perth 7.10 (52) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9367)
  • A Perth team minus Rea and Watson failed to counter East Fremantle in Peake’s three hundredth senior match. Half-forward Peter Wilson was the star, with four goals and numerous electrifying bursts, whilst George Christie was superb in a back pocket.[92]
  • 34 kicks from Neil Taylor and seven goals each from Sells and Breman allowed Subiaco to crush Swans, scoring 14.12 (96) to 1.5 (11) in the first half. Garry Sidebottom ended his career by being crushed by Clint Brown and left the field injured with Swan Districts still goalless twelve minutes into the second quarter.[93]
  • West Perth’s convincing win over Claremont was the Tigers’ fifth straight loss and left the former pacesetters in danger of losing their finals berth.
  • South Fremantle equaled East Perth’s earlier-season record of conceding 100 points for twenty consecutive games; the streaker later ended in the last round.[73]
  • At the East Perth versus South Fremantle match, the East Perth banner remained on the ground early in the match and produced confusion whereby John Worsfold kicked the ball through the East Perth goal and it was initially registered as a goal to the Royals, then to the Bulldogs – before the correct score of a behind to East Perth was added.[94]

Round 21[edit]

Round 21
Saturday, 23 August Subiaco 27.17 (179) def. West Perth 12.9 (81) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 9916)
Saturday, 23 August South Fremantle 21.16 (142) def. Swan Districts 12.12 (84) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5147) [95]
Saturday, 23 August Perth 16.15 (111) def. by East Perth 21.21 (147) Lathlain Park (crowd: 6910)
Saturday, 23 August Claremont 13.11 (89) def. by East Fremantle 27.14 (176) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5768)
  • Breman, Sells and Dean combined for eighteen goals as Bunton kept all three close to the goal square. An unstoppable centreline and a powerful half-forward line of Georgiades and Langdon, Subiaco denied West Perth’s dream of a finals berth in crushing style.[96]
  • A powerhouse display with Bennett scoring 11.6 (72) after missing more than a season with injury allowed East Fremantle to crush an uncommitted Tiger outfit.[97]

Ladder[edit]

1986 WAFL Ladder
TEAM P W L D PF PA  % PTS
1 Subiaco 21 17 4 0 2790 2004 139.22 68
2 East Fremantle 21 16 5 0 2917 2092 139.44 64
3 Perth 21 12 8 1 2506 2537 98.78 50
4 Claremont 21 10 11 0 2507 2255 111.18 40
5 West Perth 21 9 11 1 2243 2529 88.69 38
6 East Perth 21 7 14 0 2311 2652 87.14 28
7 South Fremantle 21 7 14 0 2185 2916 74.93 28
8 Swan Districts 21 5 16 0 2318 2792 83.02 20
Key: P = Played, W = Won, L = Lost, D = Drawn, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against

Finals series[edit]

First Semi-Final[edit]

First Semi Final
Saturday, 30 August Perth 24.18 (162) def. Claremont 13.11 (89) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 21,037)

Despite the return of Mitchell and Malaxos, Claremont was uncompetitive against the Demons, who rebounded from two bad losses and never lost control.[98]

Second Semi-Final[edit]

Second Semi Final
Saturday, 6 September Subiaco 12.11 (83) def. by East Fremantle 20.13 (133) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 25,535) [99]

East Fremantle’s Darren Bennett became the first player to kick ten or more goals in a WA(N)FL final,[100] and made the Sharks red-hot favourites to equal Port Adelaide’s 27 flags in the major Australian Rules leagues.

Preliminary Final[edit]

Preliminary Final
Saturday, 13 September Subiaco 26.12 (168) def. Perth 15.7 (97) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 23,503) [101]

Grand Final[edit]

1986 WAFL Grand Final
Saturday, 20 September East Fremantle def. by Subiaco Subiaco Oval (crowd: 38,389) [102]
1.2 (8)
3.7 (25)
6.9 (45)
8.13 (61)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Final
6.3 (39)
13.4 (82)
17.8 (110)
19.16 (130)
Umpires: Kim O‘Driscoll, Mike Ball
Simpson Medal: Mark Zanotti (Subiaco)
Bennett 2, Wilson 2, Waterson 2, Green, Mainwaring Goals Breman 4, Keene 3, Sells 3, Macnish 3, Dwayne Lamb 2, Dean, Carpenter, Brian Taylor, Neil Taylor
Harding, Neesham, Rowland, O‘Sullivan, Mainwaring, Wilson, Solin Best Zanotti, Dwayne Lamb, P. Lamb, Carpenter, Scott, Featherby, Macnish, Dargie
Peter Wilson by field umpire O‘Driscoll for striking Rod Willett in the third quarter Reports Stephen Sells by goal umpire Lester Cox for striking Scott Rowland in the second quarter

Subiaco crushed a powerful East Fremantle side to complete a rags-to-riches story over three seasons under Haydn Bunton, Jr., going from one win in 1982[c] and four in 1983 to premiers.

Notes[edit]

a As of 1986, the WACA had not been used for any WA(N)FL match since Perth ceased playing its home games there at the end of the 1958 season.
b In Round 17 of 1944 East Fremantle beat a winless under-19 South Fremantle team by 201 points.
c Ironically, their one win during 1982 was against East Fremantle.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hess, Rob and Stewart, Bob; More Than a Game: The Real Story of Australian Rules Football, p. 230 ISBN 0522847722
  2. ^ See Denham, Greg and Stocks, Gary; ‘New Draft Puts WAFL Clubs “on Death Row”’; The West Australian, 12 July 1988, pp. 100, 98
  3. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘WAFL Back off Sunday Plan’; The West Australian, 6 May 1986, p. 100
  4. ^ a b Marsh, David; ‘More Games in WA Towns’; The West Australian, 30 June 1986, p. 80
  5. ^ a b Christian, Geoff; ‘Perth on the Move’; The West Australian, 21 April 1986, p. 101
  6. ^ WAFL Reserves Ladder Positions (download)
  7. ^ WAFL Colts Ladder Positions (download)
  8. ^ Casey, Kevin (1995); The Tigers’ Tale: the origins and history of the Claremont Football Club, pp. 158-159. ISBN 0646264982
  9. ^ See Christian, Geoff; ‘Tunbridge Ready to Make League Debut’; The West Australian, 13 June 1986, p. 76
  10. ^ a b Marsh, David; ‘Tigers’ Defence Makes a Point’; The West Australian, 26 May 1986, p. 76
  11. ^ a b Marsh, David; ‘Toothless Bulldogs No Match for Swans’; The West Australian, 5 May 1986, p. 101
  12. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Consider Options: The Bulldogs Look to New Sports Center’; The West Australian, 10 May 1985, p. 210
  13. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Smith Gives Demons More Grit’; The West Australian, 31 March 1986, p. 68
  14. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘What a Difference a Year Makes for Lions’; The West Australian, 31 March 1986, p. 68
  15. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Won from Half-Time Deficit
  16. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Taylor-Made Victory for Swan Districts’; The West Australian, 1 April 1986, p. 96
  17. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: South Fremantle v Each Opponent
  18. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Records Tumble as Claremont Crush South’; The West Australian, 1 April 1986, p. 96
  19. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Sad Royals Mauled’; The West Australian, 7 April 1986, p. 84
  20. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Sharks Can Thank Peake, Buhagiar’; The West Australian, 7 April 1986, p. 84
  21. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Great Scott: Tigers’ Ace is Back on Top’; The West Australian, 7 April 1986, p. 84
  22. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Largest Margins at Quarter-time
  23. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Bulldogs Regain Their Bite’; The West Australian, 14 April 1986, p. 82
  24. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Subiaco Unperturbed by Injuries or Perth’; The West Australian, 14 April 1986, p. 83
  25. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bryant the Driving force for Royals’; The West Australian, 14 April 1986, p. 83
  26. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘West Perth’s Wingmen Clip the Swans’; The West Australian, 21 April 1986, p. 100
  27. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Scruffy Looks but Tidy Manner’; The West Australian, 21 April 1986, p. 101
  28. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Sharks Survive a Torrid Battle’; The West Australian, 21 April 1986, p. 99
  29. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Starcevich Stars in Royals’ Win’; The West Australian, 26 April 1986, p. 192
  30. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Scorned Stainowsky Turns Hero’; The West Australian, 28 April 1986, p. 83
  31. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Master Moss Calls the Tune’; The West Australian, 28 April 1986, p. 83
  32. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Perth’s Year of Living Dangerously’; The West Australian, 5 May 1986, p. 101
  33. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Malaxos, Mitchell Magic: They Were too Much for East’; The West Australian, 5 May 1986, p. 101
  34. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Worsfold Zest Heartening for South’; The West Australian, 12 May 1986, p. 76
  35. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Perth Are No Match for Slick Sharks’; The West Australian, 12 May 1986, p. 77
  36. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Dean, Sartori Star in Drama’; The West Australian, 12 May 1986, p. 77
  37. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Michalczyk Dead, then Suddenly Falcons Work a Miracle’; The West Australian, 12 May 1986, p. 76
  38. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘When Bradmore Flies, Falcons Fly’; The West Australian, 19 May 1986, p. 85
  39. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Stylish Goulding Is too Much for South’; The West Australian, 19 May 1986, p. 85
  40. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Lions Handle the Pressure’; The West Australian, 19 May 1986, p. 84
  41. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Bushell Gets Five Weeks’; The West Australian, 29 May 1986, p. 108
  42. ^ Hagdom, Kim; ‘Big Garry’s Back in Football – and How’; The West Australian, 19 May 1986, p. 84
  43. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘The Writing on the Wall Told All’; The West Australian, 26 May 1986, p. 76
  44. ^ Thomson, Michael; ‘Lions End It in One Term’; The West Australian, 26 May 1986, p. 76
  45. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Peake Shines in a Dull Match’; The West Australian, 26 May 1986, p. 76
  46. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Claremont Oval
  47. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘The Wheel Turns for Perth, Swans’; The West Australian, 2 June 1986, p. 76
  48. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Talented Midfielders Thrash Royals’; The West Australian, 2 June 1986, p. 76
  49. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘South Thrashed in Record Style’; The West Australian, 3 June 1986, p. 112
  50. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Subiaco Prove a Point’; The West Australian, 3 June 1986, p. 112
  51. ^ South Fremantle: Biggest Losses
  52. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Sharks too Skillful – Clash Stirs Royals’; The West Australian, 9 June 1986, p. 81
  53. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Malaxos, Davidson Seal Perth’s Fate’; The West Australian, 9 June 1986, p. 80
  54. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Defence Decisions Bring Rewards’; The West Australian, 9 June 1986, p. 81
  55. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘First Half Sizzle – Second Half Fizz’; The West Australian, 16 June 1986, p. 97
  56. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Sharks Deal an Early Blow’; The West Australian, 16 June 1986, p. 97
  57. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Virile South a Handful for Falcons’; The West Australian, 16 June 1986, p. 97
  58. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Slick Lions March On’; The West Australian, 23 June 1986, p. 101
  59. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Some Healthy Signs from Close Match’; The West Australian, 23 June 1986, p. 101
  60. ^ WAFL Footy Facts Team v Team: Consecutive 100+ Scores
  61. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Perth’s Confidence Was Not Misplaced’; The West Australian, 23 June 1986, p. 100
  62. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘A New Trick from the Falcons’ Bag’; The West Australian, 23 June 1986, p. 100
  63. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘The Credit Goes to Sartori’; The West Australian, 30 June 1986, p. 81
  64. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Early Risers Almost Catch Demons Napping’; The West Australian, 30 June 1986, p. 81
  65. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Subiaco Deal Falcons a Final-Four Blow’; The West Australian, 30 June 1986, p. 81
  66. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Tigers Survive Critical Challenge’; The West Australian, 30 June 1986, p. 81
  67. ^ See Kalgoorlie-Bouler Airport (012038) June 1986 rainfall
  68. ^ Marsh, David; ‘More Games for Country’; The West Australian, 1 July 1986, p. 79
  69. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Ruckmen Spark Overdue Win for East Perth’; The West Australian, 7 July 1986, p. 93
  70. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Face Is Familiar but...’; The West Australian, 14 July 1986, p. 81
  71. ^ Perth Regional Office (009034) July 1986 rainfall
  72. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Perth’s Regeneration Is Complete’; The West Australian, 7 July 1986, p. 93
  73. ^ a b WAFL Footy Facts: Consecutive Games Conceding Over 100 Points
  74. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Sharks Deal Lions Sharp Jolt’; The West Australian, 14 July 1986, p. 81
  75. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘What a Great Finish – WA Clinch Title in Thriller’; The West Australian, 9 July 1986,pp. 118, 126
  76. ^ Cave, Jason (17 March 2008). "The greatest State of Origin game ever, WA v Victoria ’86". The Roar. 
  77. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Ryan Discipline Makes Its Mark’; The West Australian, 21 July 1986, p. 81
  78. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Nothing to Smile About at Subiaco’; The West Australian, 21 July 1986, p. 81
  79. ^ Marsh, David; ‘The Re-Making of Swans’; The West Australian, 21 July 1986, p. 81
  80. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Falcons Fold to Lively Royals’; The West Australian, 28 July 1986, p. 79
  81. ^ Hagdom, Kim; ‘Neesham Runs His Rivals Ragged’; The West Australian, 28 July 1986, p. 79
  82. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Perth Profit From Wiley’s Thirst for Hard Work’; The West Australian, 28 July 1986, p. 80
  83. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Swans Fall to Speed and Precision’; The West Australian, 4 August 1986, p. 96
  84. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Tigers Pay for Watson Move’; The West Australian, 4 August 1986, p. 97
  85. ^ Thomson, Michael; ‘Subiaco Waited and Waited But...’; The West Australian, 4 August 1986, p. 96
  86. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Bulldogs Find a Formula for Success’; The West Australian, 11 August 1986, p. 84
  87. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Swans Revival Suffers a Setback’; The West Australian, 11 August 1986, p. 85
  88. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘A Story of Muscle and Pace: Rea and Ryder Humble Subiaco’; The West Australian, 11 August 1986, p. 85
  89. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Moss Has a Week to Find a Remedy’; The West Australian, 11 August 1986, p. 84
  90. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Big Glen Bartlett Takes Up the Challenge’; The West Australian, 18 August 1986, p. 104
  91. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Hooked on the West Perth Habit’; The West Australian, 18 August 1986, p. 104
  92. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Wilson Bruises Perth Ego’; The West Australian, 18 August 1986, p. 105
  93. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Taylor the Brains Behind the Battle’; The West Australian, 18 August 1986, p. 104
  94. ^ ‘Stab Pass off the Wrong Foot’; The West Australian, 18 August 1986, p. 104
  95. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Bairstow’s Personal Triumph’; The West Australian, 25 August 1986, p. 81
  96. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Lions Thrive on New Tactic in Attack’; The West Australian, 25 August 1986, p. 80
  97. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Sharks’ Trio Wipe ‘85 Blues’; The West Australian, 25 August 1986, p. 80
  98. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Devastating Demons Deliver Warning’; The West Australian, 1 September 1986, pp. 100, 97
  99. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Sharks Look too Hot’; The West Australian, 8 September 1985, pp. 80, 76
  100. ^ Atkinson, Graeme and Hanlon, Michael; 3AW Book of Footy Records: All the Great Players, Matches, Goals, Kicks, Brawls and Sensations from More Than 100 Years of Aussie Rules in Australia; p. 138. ISBN 1863210091
  101. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Subiaco Must Do a Bit of Thinking’; The West Australian, 15 September 1986, p. 100
  102. ^ ‘Lions Go from Penery to Opulence’; in The West Australian; 22 September 1986; pp. 75, 80

External links[edit]