1986 World Ice Hockey Championships

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1986 World Ice Hockey Championships
1986 World Ice Hockey Championships USSR stamp.jpg
A Soviet stamp dedicated to the 1986 World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country  Soviet Union
Dates 12–28 April
Teams 8
Venue(s)(in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Soviet Union (20th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg  Sweden
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  Canada
Fourth place  Finland
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Goals scored 296 (7.4 per match)
Attendance 375,820 (9,396 per match)
Scoring leader(s) Soviet Union Sergei Makarov 18 points
1985
1987

The 1986 Ice Hockey World Championships took place in the Soviet Union from 12 April to 28 April. The games were played at the Luzhniki Palace of Sports and the CSKA Ice Palace in Moscow, and eight teams took part. Each team played each other once, and then The four best teams then played each other once more with no results carrying over, and the other four teams played each other again to determine ranking and relegation. This was the 51st World Championships, and also the 62nd ice hockey European Championships. The reigning world champions from Czechoslovakia finished fifth, and the Soviet Union became World Champions for the twentieth time, and also won their 24th European Championship. In the European Championship, only mutual games between European teams in the first round were counted. For the disappointing Czechoslovaks, this was the first time since 1967 that they had finished out of the medals,[1] and their worst result outside the Olympics since 1937.

Attracting little notice at the time, Brett Hull made his debut in international hockey for the United States. It would appear that if Canadian coach Dave King had invited him to play in Moscow, the College student with dual citizenship, would have happily chosen a different path. Instead he chose to accept coach Dave Peterson's offer to compete for the Americans.[1][2]

World Championship Group A (Soviet Union)[edit]

First Round[edit]

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
1  Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 32 - 09 14
2  Sweden 7 5 1 1 34 - 18 11
3  Finland 7 4 2 1 28 - 18 10
4  Canada 7 3 0 4 24 - 22 6
5  Czechoslovakia 7 2 1 4 17 - 17 5
6  United States 7 2 0 5 27 - 28 4
7  West Germany 7 2 0 5 17 - 39 4
8  Poland 7 1 0 6 15 - 43 2
12 AprilCanada 8-3 West Germany
12 AprilFinland 5-4 United States
12 AprilPoland 2-1 Czechoslovakia
12 AprilSoviet Union 4-2 Sweden
13 AprilSweden 4-1 Canada
13 AprilUnited States 7-2 Poland
13 AprilSoviet Union 4-1 Finland
13 AprilWest Germany 4-3 Czechoslovakia
15 AprilSweden 3-2 Czechoslovakia
15 AprilSoviet Union 7-2 Poland
15 AprilUnited States 9-2 West Germany
15 AprilFinland 3-2 Canada
16 AprilCanada 8-3 Poland
16 AprilFinland 1-1 Czechoslovakia
16 AprilSoviet Union 4-1 West Germany
16 AprilSweden 5-2 United States
17 AprilSoviet Union 4-0 Canada
17 AprilCzechoslovakia 5-2 United States
17 AprilFinland 4-2 Poland
17 AprilSweden 4-2 West Germany
18 AprilSweden 12-3 Poland
18 AprilFinland 10-1 West Germany
19 AprilCanada 4-2 United States
19 AprilSoviet Union 4-2 Czechoslovakia
20 AprilWest Germany 4-1 Poland
20 AprilSweden 4-4 Finland
22 AprilCzechoslovakia 3-1 Canada
22 AprilSoviet Union 5-1 United States

Final Round[edit]

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
1  Soviet Union 3 3 0 0 18 - 06 6
2  Sweden 3 1 1 1 12 - 12 3
3  Canada 3 1 0 2 13 - 16 2
4  Finland 3 0 1 2 07 - 16 1
24 AprilSoviet Union 7-4 Canada
24 AprilSweden 4-4 Finland
26 AprilSweden 6-5 Canada
26 AprilSoviet Union 8-0 Finland
28 AprilCanada 4-3 Finland
28 AprilSoviet Union 3-2 Sweden

Consolation Round[edit]

Team Games Won Tied Lost GF - GA Points
5  Czechoslovakia 10 5 1 4 38 - 21 11
6  United States 10 4 0 6 41 - 43 8
7  West Germany 10 2 1 7 23 - 52 5
8  Poland 10 1 1 8 26 - 63 3

Poland, needing a win of four goals or more on the final day, tied, and were relegated

23 AprilCzechoslovakia 8-1 Poland
23 AprilUnited States 5-0 West Germany
25 AprilUnited States 7-5 Poland
25 AprilCzechoslovakia 3-1 West Germany
27 AprilCzechoslovakia 10-2 United States
27 AprilWest Germany 5-5 Poland

World Championship Group B (Netherlands)[edit]

Played in Eindhoven March 20–29. The Swiss, narrowly failing to gain promotion in last year's tournament, made no mistake this year, losing only in a final meaningless game against East Germany. On the last day of competition, four different nations were in danger of relegation, with a myriad of tie breaking scenarios.[3]

Depending on the results of the final day, two of Austria, Japan, the Netherlands, and Yugoslavia would be relegated. In the first game Yugoslavia played Japan with the loser being relegated. A five to zero score relegated Japan. In the next game, Italy beat France, assuring the Austrians of safety from relegation. The Dutch had their fate in their own hands in the last game, a win and they would remain, a loss and they would be relegated. The unfortunate Yugoslavian team had to watch all day and hope, a hope dashed by a Dutch three to two win over Austria.[4]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost GF - GA Points Tie
H2H Points
4-way
Tie
H2H Points
4th/5th 6th/7th
9   Switzerland 7 6 0 1 38 - 20 12
10  Italy 7 4 0 3 21 - 18 8
11  East Germany 7 4 0 3 25 - 21 8
12  France 7 3 0 4 22 - 25 6 4 2
13  Netherlands 7 3 0 4 25 - 32 6 4 0
14  Austria 7 3 0 4 24 - 27 6 2 2
15  Yugoslavia 7 3 0 4 24 - 25 6 2 0
16  Japan 7 2 0 5 15 - 26 4

Switzerland was promoted to Group A. Yugoslavia and Japan were relegated to Group C.

20 MarchNetherlands 6-3 Yugoslavia
20 MarchEast Germany 4-6 Austria
20 MarchSwitzerland  4-1 Italy
20 MarchFrance 1-2 Japan
21 MarchAustria 1-6 Italy
21 MarchJapan 4-6  Switzerland
22 MarchNetherlands 3-4 France
22 MarchEast Germany 4-2 Yugoslavia
23 MarchSwitzerland  8-2 France
23 MarchYugoslavia 2-5 Austria
23 MarchNetherlands 3-4 Japan
23 MarchEast Germany 3-4 Italy
24 MarchJapan 0-1 Italy
24 MarchAustria 3-4  Switzerland
25 MarchFrance 5-6 Yugoslavia
25 MarchNetherlands 2-5 East Germany
26 MarchItaly 1-4 Yugoslavia
26 MarchJapan 3-4 East Germany
26 MarchFrance 6-1 Austria
26 MarchNetherlands 3-11  Switzerland
28 MarchEast Germany 0-3 France
28 MarchYugoslavia 2-4  Switzerland
28 MarchJapan 2-6 Austria
28 MarchNetherlands 5-3 Italy
29 MarchYugoslavia 5-0 Japan
29 MarchItaly 5-1 France
29 MarchSwitzerland  1-5 East Germany
29 MarchNetherlands 3-2 Austria

World Championship Group C (Spain)[edit]

Played in Puigcerda March 23 to April 1.

First Round[edit]

Group C was expanded this year, ten teams were divided into two groups of five. The top two from each group played off for first, while third and fourth places played off for fifth through eighth. Mutual games from the first round were carried forward and counted in the second round. The two last place teams were relegated to the first Group D.

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Norway 4 4 0 0 42 - 07 8
2  Romania 4 3 0 1 26 - 09 6
3  Denmark 4 2 0 2 18 - 13 4
4  Spain 4 0 1 3 08 - 32 1
5  South Korea 4 0 1 3 05 - 38 1

South Korea was relegated to Group D.

23 MarchNorway 18-3 Spain
23 MarchRomania 13-0 South Korea
24 MarchNorway 11-1 South Korea
24 MarchRomania 5-1 Denmark
26 MarchSouth Korea 1-11 Denmark
26 MarchRomania 5-2 Spain
27 MarchNorway 7-0 Denmark
27 MarchSpain 3-3 South Korea
29 MarchDenmark 6-0 Spain
29 MarchNorway 6-3 Romania

Group 2[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  China 4 3 1 0 35 - 04 7
2  Bulgaria 4 3 0 1 13 - 16 6
3  North Korea 4 1 1 2 08 - 15 3
4  Hungary 4 1 1 2 17 - 14 3
5  Australia 4 0 1 3 09 - 33 1

Australia was relegated to Group D.

23 MarchChina 15-0 Australia
23 MarchHungary 2-4 North Korea
24 MarchAustralia 3-11 Hungary
24 MarchChina 9-1 Bulgaria
26 MarchNorth Korea 1-9 China
26 MarchAustralia 4-5 Bulgaria
27 MarchNorth Korea 2-2 Australia
27 MarchBulgaria 5-2 Hungary
29 MarchBulgaria 2-1 North Korea
29 MarchHungary 2-2 China

Final Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
17  Norway 3 2 1 0 19 - 07 5
18  China 3 2 1 0 16 - 07 5
19  Bulgaria 3 1 0 2 09 - 23 2
20  Romania 3 0 0 3 10 - 17 0

Norway and China were both promoted to Group B.

30 MarchNorway 10-1 Bulgaria
30 MarchChina 4-3 Romania
1 AprilBulgaria 7-4 Romania
1 AprilNorway 3-3 China

Consolation Round[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
21  Denmark 3 3 0 0 20 - 05 6
22  Hungary 3 1 0 2 16 - 17 2
23  North Korea 3 1 0 2 10 - 14 2
24  Spain 3 1 0 2 11 - 21 2
30 MarchDenmark 8-4 Hungary
30 MarchSpain 6-5 North Korea
1 AprilSpain 5-10 Hungary
1 AprilDenmark 6-1 North Korea
Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
25  South Korea 1 1 0 0 09 - 07 2
26  Australia 1 0 0 1 07 - 09 0
31 MarchSouth Korea 9-7 Australia

Ranking and statistics[edit]

 


 1986 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Soviet Union
20th title

Tournament Awards[edit]

Final standings[edit]

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
Silver medal icon.svg  Sweden
Bronze medal icon.svg  Canada
4  Finland
5  Czechoslovakia
6  United States
7  West Germany
8  Poland

European championships final standings[edit]

The final standings of the European championships according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Soviet Union
Silver medal icon.svg  Sweden
Bronze medal icon.svg  Finland
4  West Germany
5  Poland
6  Czechoslovakia

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Soviet Union Sergei Makarov 10 4 14 18 +21 12 F
Soviet Union Vladimir Krutov 10 7 10 17 +23 14 F
Soviet Union Viacheslav Fetisov 10 6 9 15 +20 10 D
Czechoslovakia Vladimír Růžička 10 4 11 15 +15 6 F
Czechoslovakia Jiří Hrdina 10 7 5 12 +14 12 F
Soviet Union Vyacheslav Bykov 10 6 6 12 +6 2 F
Sweden Anders Carlsson 10 6 6 12 +5 12 F
Sweden Thomas Steen 8 8 3 11 +13 16 F
United States Brett Hull 10 7 4 11 +1 16 F
Canada Brent Sutter 8 4 7 11 +2 8 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Soviet Union Yevgeni Belosheikin 420 11 1.57 .915 2
Czechoslovakia Dominik Hašek 538 19 2.12 .901 0
United States Chris Terreri 286 20 4.20 .895 1
Canada Jacques Cloutier 298 15 3.02 .893 0
Finland Hannu Kamppuri 299 16 3.21 .880 0

Source: [2]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. p. 507. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9. 
  2. ^ Brett Hull stands by his decision to play for Americans. thehockeynews.com (2008-08-12)
  3. ^ Group B summary. passionhockey.com
  4. ^ Tie breaking format reference in addition 1992 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships for how four way ties are broken.

References[edit]

  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 151–2.