1986 in British television

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List of years in British television (table)

This is a list of British television related events from 1986.

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • 10 March – The first advert for a sanitary towel is broadcast on British television, on Channel 4.
  • 30 March – BBC2 airs the TWO ident, which is used until 1991.

April[edit]

  • 1 April –
  • 2 April – The first in-vision teletext service is seen on ITV when Central launches its Jobfinder service which broadcasts for one hour after the end of the day's programming. Other regions launch their own Jobfinder service later in the 1980s.

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • 2 September – Ahead of the launch of all-day television on BBC1, the weekly magazine programme for Asian women, Gharbar, transfers back to BBC2. The programme moves to a new day and new slot – 9 am on Tuesdays.
  • 6 September –
  • 9 September – The last ever non-stop all-day BBC2 Ceefax transmission takes place.
  • 14 September – Matthew Parris succeeds Brian Walden as presenter of Weekend World.
  • 19 September – Central TV revives New Faces, a 1970s talent show produced by its predecessor, ATV. Styled as New Faces of '86, it is presented by Marti Caine, a winner from the previous version.
  • 20 September – British television premiere of Gordon Carroll's action thriller Blue Thunder on BBC1.[27]
  • 20–21 September – For the third and final time, BBC2 goes Rock Around the Clock.[28]
  • 27 September – BBC1 airs the British television premiere of Jay Sandrich's adventure Seems Like Old Times.[29]
  • September – For a brief period Channel 4 shows a red triangle at the start of, and during, films with adult themes.

October[edit]

  • 4 October – BBC1 airs the British television premiere of Dick Lowry's adventure film Wet Gold.[30]
  • 11 October – British television premiere of Roger Spottiswoode's crime thriller The Pursuit of D. B. Cooper on BBC1.[31]
  • 12 October – "Every Loser Wins" performed by the actor Nick Berry begins a three-week run at the top of the UK Singles Chart after featuring in recent episodes of EastEnders. The song was an instant hit on release and went on to win its writers an Ivor Novello Award.
  • 14 October – BBC2 begins regular late afternoon programming by showing a film during the second half of the gap between the end of Daytime on Two and the start of the evening's programmes.
  • 15 October – Channel 4 starts weekend morning broadcasting with weekend transmissions now beginning at around 9:30 am.
  • 16 October – The first two-hander episode of EastEnders, featuring Den and Angie Watts (Leslie Grantham and Anita Dobson), is aired by BBC1. The episode, in which Angie tells Den she has six months to live after he tells her he wants a divorce, was an experiment as the two-hander format had not been tried in a British soap before, but received well by viewers and critics.
  • 17 October – BBC2 broadcasts a teatime news summary with subtitles for the last time. For the past three years this bulletin, which had been broadcast at around 5.25 pm, had been the first programme of the day (apart from educational programmes and sports coverage).
  • 18 October – BBC1 airs the British television premiere of Peter Weir's romantic drama The Year of Living Dangerously.[32]
  • 24 October –
    • Ahead of the launch of the BBC's new daytime service, News After Noon is broadcast for the final time. The bulletin is replaced by a revamped lunchtime news programme One O'Clock News.
    • The weekday mid-afternoon regional news summary is broadcast on BBC1 for the final time. From Monday 27 October it is broadcast on BBC2.
  • 27 October –
    • BBC One starts a full daytime television service. Before today, excluding special events coverage, BBC One had closed down at times during weekday mornings and afternoons, broadcasting trade test transmissions and, from May 1983, Pages From Ceefax. BBC Two also expands its programming hours, providing a full afternoon service for the first time but it wasn't until the end of the decade that BBC Two was on air all day every day.
    • As part of the new service, Australian soap Neighbours makes its British television debut on BBC1, a year after it was first aired in its homeland.
  • 29 October – The Equalizer, a US crime drama series starring Edward Woodward makes its British television debut on ITV.

November[edit]

  • 10 November – Breakfast Time is relaunched with a more formal news and current affairs format.
  • 13 November – Self-employed hod carrier Michael Lush is killed during his first rehearsal for a live stunt planned for BBC1's The Late, Late Breakfast Show. The stunt, called "Hang 'em High", involved bungee jumping from an exploding box suspended from a 120 ft-high crane. The carabiner clip attaching his bungee rope to the crane sprang loose from its eyebolt during the jump, and he died instantly of multiple injuries. The 15 November edition of Breakfast Show is cancelled after presenter Noel Edmonds resigns, saying he does not "have the heart to carry on".[33]
  • 15 November – British television premiere of Michael Chrichton's science fiction crime drama Looker on BBC1.[34]
  • 16 November – Dennis Potter's critically acclaimed television serial The Singing Detective makes its debut on BBC1.[35]

December[edit]

  • 6 December –
    • Doctor Who concludes its The Trial of a Time Lord story arc with part 2 of "The Ultimate Foe".[36] This would mark the final televised appearance of Colin Baker as the Sixth Doctor before he was abruptly fired from the role.
    • British television premiere of Jack Smight's romantic comedy Loving Couples on BBC1.[37]
  • 7 December – Jack Rosenthal's original two-hour TV movie of London's Burning, directed by Les Blair is broadcast on ITV. It returns for a full series in February 1988.
  • 8 December – Six weeks after launching its daytime service, BBC TV starts broadcasting hourly news summaries. Morning bulletins are shown on BBC1 and early afternoon bulletins (at 2pm, 3pm and 3.50pm) are shown on BBC2. Each bulletin is followed by a weather forecast.
  • 11 December – The IBA announces that BSB has been awarded a fifteen-year franchise to operate a satellite television service in the UK.[38]
  • 13 December –
  • 17 December – Ringo Starr narrates his last ever Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends stories which make up the second series finale, “Woolly Bear” and "Thomas & the Missing Christmas Tree".
  • 25 December –
  • 26 December – The Rainbow 30 minute Christmas special, Rainbow Christmas Show (aka The Colours of the Rainbow) is the highest ever rating episode of the show. It was thought that Rainbow would end following this episode, but Thames Television renewed the contract after good ratings.
  • 28 December – BBC1 begins a season of films starring Dustin Hoffman, starting with the British television premiere of Tootsie.[42]
  • 31 December – New Year's Eve highlights on BBC1 include the British television premiere of the 1984 Australian animated film The Camel Boy, and Day After the Fair, a screenplay starring Hannah Gordon, Kenneth Haigh, Anna Massey and Martyn Stanbridge. Terry Wogan welcomes in the New Year from the BBC Television Theatre.[43]

Debuts[edit]

BBC1[edit]

BBC2[edit]

ITV[edit]

Channel 4[edit]

Sky Channel[edit]

Television shows[edit]

Changes of network affiliation[edit]

Shows Moved from Moved to
United States Sesame Street (British syndication) ITV Channel 4
Opportunity Knocks BBC1
France/United States Heathcliff and the Catillac Cats The Children's Channel

Returning this year after a break of one year or longer[edit]

  • 11 September – This Week (1956–1978, 1986–1992)
  • 19 September – New Faces (1973–1978, 1986–1988)

1920s[edit]

  • BBC Wimbledon (1927–present)

1930s[edit]

  • BBC Cricket (1939–1999, 2020–2024)

1940s[edit]

1950s[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

Ending this year[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Date Name Age Cinematic Credibility
3 January Dustin Gee 43 comedian
6 February Dandy Nichols 78 actress (Till Death Us Do Part)
10 March Ray Milland 79 actor
17 September Pat Phoenix 62 actress (Elsie Tanner in Coronation Street)
22 September Janet Davies 59 actress (Dad's Army)
28 October Ian Marter 42 actor and writer
Eddie Waring 76 rugby commentator and presenter
21 December Bill Simpson 55 actor (Dr. Finlay's Casebook)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BBC One London – 1 January 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  2. ^ "Tomorrow's World – BBC One London – 2 January 1986". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Dynasty – BBC One London – 17 January 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Screen Two: The Silent Twins". BBC Genome. BBC. 19 January 1986. Retrieved 17 September 2017.
  5. ^ "Dynasty II: The Colbys – BBC One London – 24 January 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  6. ^ Round Britain Whizz on IMDb
  7. ^ "It's Not Just Zammo – BBC One London – 1 April 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  8. ^ Malvern, Jack (December 12, 2003). "Just say no". The Daily Summit. British Council.
  9. ^ Saner, Emine (7 March 2016). "Just say no! What really happened when Grange Hill met Nancy Reagan at the White House". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  10. ^ "Video Jukebox – BBC One London – 9 May 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  11. ^ "Official Chart History – Spitting Image – The Chicken Song". Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  12. ^ "A Very Peculiar Practice: 1: A Very Long Way from Anywhere – BBC Two England – 21 May 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  13. ^ "Kane and Abel – BBC One London – 3 June 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  14. ^ "Kane and Abel – BBC One London – 5 June 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Kane and Abel – BBC One London – 6 June 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  16. ^ ""1986: Prince Andrew weds Sarah Ferguson", BBC News". 1986-07-23. Retrieved 2009-04-22.
  17. ^ "Top of the Pops – BBC One London – 23 July 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 27 October 2018.
  18. ^ "XIII Commonwealth Games: The Opening Ceremony – BBC One London – 24 July 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 27 October 2018.
  19. ^ "* pm Saturday Night at the Movies: Taps – BBC One London – 30 August 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  20. ^ "Sunday Premiere: The Monocled Mutineer – BBC One London – 31 August 1986". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  21. ^ Badsey, Stephen (2000). The Media and International Security. Routledge. pp. 83–84. ISBN 0-7146-4848-5.
  22. ^ "James Bond On TV – Movies". MI6 – The Home Of James Bond 007. 5 April 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  23. ^ "Doctor Who – BBC One London – 6 September 1986". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  24. ^ "Casualty – BBC One London – 6 September 1986". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  25. ^ Tristram Fane Saunders (2016-06-07). "Duffy returning to Casualty for 1,000th episode". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  26. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Saturn 3 – BBC One London – 6 September 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  27. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Blue Thunder – BBC One London – 20 September 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  28. ^ "BBC Two England – 20 September 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  29. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Seems Like Old Times – BBC One London – 27 September 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  30. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Wet Gold – BBC One London – 4 October 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  31. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: The Pursuit of D. B. Cooper – BBC One London – 11 October 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  32. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: The Year of Living Dangerously – BBC One London – 18 October 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  33. ^ Sapsted, David (17 November 1986). "Family to delay legal action decision". The Times.
  34. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Looker – BBC One London – 15 November 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  35. ^ "The Singing Detective – BBC One London – 16 November 1986". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  36. ^ "Doctor Who: The Trial of a Time Lord: Part 14 – BBC One London – 6 December 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  37. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: Loving Couples – BBC One London – 6 December 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  38. ^ Transdiffusion Broadcasting System (2 June 2012). "BSB contract award – December 1986" – via YouTube.
  39. ^ "Saturday Night at the Movies: The Beastmaster – BBC One London – 13 December 1986 – BBC Genome". Genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  40. ^ Revoir, Paul (2008-10-07). "The most watched TV shows of all time – and they are all old programmes". Daily Mail. Retrieved 2011-03-03.
  41. ^ "Christmas 1986 – TV Cream". TV Cream. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  42. ^ "Dustin Hoffman in Tootsie – BBC One London – 28 December 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  43. ^ "BBC One London – 31 December 1986 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 September 2018.