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1987 World Snooker Championship

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1987 Embassy World Snooker Championship
1987 World Snooker Championship official poster.jpg
Tournament information
Dates18 April – 4 May 1987
VenueCrucible Theatre
CitySheffield
CountryEngland
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£400,000
Winner's share£80,000
Highest break Steve Davis (ENG) (127)
Final
Champion Steve Davis (ENG)
Runner-up Joe Johnson (ENG)
Score18–14
1986
1988

The 1987 World Snooker Championship (also referred to as the 1987 Embassy World Snooker Championship for the purposes of sponsorship) was a professional snooker tournament that took place between 18 April and 4 May 1987 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. It was the sixth and final ranking event of the 1986–87 snooker season. The championship was the 1987 edition of the World Snooker Championship, first held in 1927. The tournament was sponsored by cigarette manufacturer Embassy. The event had a prize fund of £400,000 with the winner receiving £80,000.

Defending champion Joe Johnson had a disappointing season in terms of results since his 1986 victory, but, as a 66–1 outsider to win, reached the final. In a rematch of the previous year's final, Johnson played Steve Davis in the final. Davis won his fourth championship by defeating Johnson 18–14. A total of 18 century breaks were made during the tournament, the highest of which was a 127 made by Davis in the final. Stephen Hendry became the youngest player to win a match at the World Snooker Championship, whilst the event was the last time that six-times champion Ray Reardon appeared at the World Championships.

Overview[edit]

The World Snooker Championship is a professional tournament and the official world championship of the game of snooker.[1] Founded in the late 19th century by British Army soldiers stationed in India,[2] the sport was popular in the British Isles.[3] However, in the modern era it has become increasingly popular worldwide, especially in East and Southeast Asian nations such as China, Hong Kong and Thailand.[a][3][5][6]

The championship featured 32 professional players competing in one-on-one snooker matches in a single elimination format, each played over several frames. The 32 competitors in the main tournament were selected using a combination of the top players in the world snooker rankings and a pre-tournament qualification stage.[7][8] Joe Davis won the first World Championship in 1927, the final match being held in Camkin's Hall, Birmingham, England.[9][10] Since 1977, the event has been held in the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.[11][12]

Format[edit]

The championship was held from 18 April and 4 May 1987 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England, the 11th consecutive time that the tournament was held at the venue.[13] It was the last ranking event of the 1986–87 snooker season on the World Snooker Tour.[13] There were a total of 120 entrants from the tour, and the competition's main draw had 32 participants.[13] A four-round knockout qualifying competition was held at Preston Guild Hall from 26 March to 4 April, and produced the 16 qualifying players who progressed into the main draw to play the top 16 seeds.[13][14]

The top 16 players in the latest world rankings automatically qualified for the main draw as seeded players.[b] As defending champion, Joe Johnson was seeded first for the event; the remaining 15 seeds were allocated based on the payers' world ranking positions.[16] Matches in the first round of the main draw were played as best-of-19-frames. The number of frames needed to win a match increased to 13 in the second round and quarter-finals, and 16 in the semi-finals; the final match was played as best-of-35-frames.[13][17]

Prize fund[edit]

The event featured a prize fund of £400,000 with the winner receiving £80,000. The breakdown of prize money for the event is shown below:[14][18]

  • Winner: £80,000
  • Runner-up: £48,000
  • Semi-finals: £24,000
  • Quarter-finals: £12,000
  • Last 16: £6,000
  • Last 32: £3,375
  • Highest break: £8,000
  • Maximum break: £80,000
  • Total: £400,000

Tournament summary[edit]

The defending champion Joe Johnson had experienced a "disappointing" season, not managing to reach a major final.[19] However, Sydney Friskin of The Times reported that Johnson prepared for the Championship by reportedly practicing diligently, and that the cyst on his back that previously troubled him had been removed.[20] Johnson started the event as a bookmakers' outsider, priced at 66–1 against winning the tournament.[21]

Leading up to the event, Neal Foulds had been the most successful player of the season, having gained the most ranking points during the season, ahead of Steve Davis.[19] On 6 April, the two-times world champion Alex Higgins was fined £12,000 and given a six-month ban from tournaments by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA), the ban starting on 5 May, the day after the 1987 World Snooker Championship final. The penalties resulted from a number of incidents, the most serious being Higgins headbutting Paul Hatherall, a WPBSA tournament director, at the 1986 UK Championship.[22]

Qualifying[edit]

An image of the Preston Guild Hall
The Preston Guild Hall hosted qualifying for the event

The qualifying rounds were played at the Preston Guild Hall from 26 March to 4 April 1987.[23][24] There were four rounds of qualifying, with higher ranked players seeded into the later rounds. There were 104 entrants to qualifying, although four subsequently withdrew from the first round. The 16 winners in the fourth round progressed to play the tournament's top 16 seeds at the Crucible. All qualifying matches were best-of-19 frames.[13]

There were 24 matches scheduled in the first qualifying round, but Frank Jonik, Eddie McLaughlin, Sakchai Sim Ngam and Omprakesh Agrawal all withdrew, meaning that their opponents received walkovers.[13] The 11-time pool world champion Jim Rempe,[25] made a break of 104 in beating Martin Smith 10–9.[26] Veteran professional Bernard Bennett suffered the only whitewash of the first round, failing to win a frame against Billy Kelly.[13]

In the second round, there were 32 matches. The youngest player in the competition, Stephen Hendry, made a break of 108 during his 10–7 defeat of Mike Darrington.[27] Eight-times champion Fred Davis lost 5–10 to Ken Owers. Another former champion, John Spencer, who had won the title three times, beat Roger Bales 10–3.[28][29] Trailing after the first session of his qualifying match 3–5, Jimmy van Rensberg was taken to hospital with a suspected heart attack. However, he was later discharged and went on to win 10–6.[30]

The third round consisted of 16 matches between winners from the second round.[13] Hendry led 8–1 at the end of their first session, with Rempe winning three consecutive frames in their second session before Hendry won the match at 10–4. Gino Rigitano conceded the 11th frame of his match against Steve Newbury when there were still enough balls on the table for him to win, and when 4–9 down decided not to play the next frame, thereby losing 4–10.[31] There were two 10–0 whitewashes: by Jon Wright over Mark Wildman and by Tony Jones over van Rensberg.[13]

The fourth round also featured 16 matches, with 16 players seeded into the round each meeting one of the third round winners.[13] For the first time since turning professional, John Spencer failed to qualify for the event, as he was defeated 5–10 by Barry West.[28] Bill Werbeniuk and Eddie Charlton both also failed to qualify for the competition for the first time. Werbeniuk lost 8–10 to Mark Bennett and Charlton was defeated 4–10 by Warren King. The only match to go to a deciding frame in round four was John Virgo's 10–9 win over Tony Jones.[13][32]

Dene O'Kane scored five century breaks across his three matches, a new record, including the highest break in qualifying of 132.[19] He received £2,000 for the highest break in qualifying.[20]

First round[edit]

Stephen Hendry ready to play a shot on a red ball
Stephen Hendry was the youngest player to date to win a match at the event.

The first round was held from 18 to 23 April with matches played as the best-of-19 frames over two sessions.[33] Defending champion Joe Johnson played Eugene Hughes, with the match being going to a deciding frame and Johnson winning 10–9.[34] Steve Davis was 7–1 ahead of Warren King at the end of their first session. King then won six of the next seven frames to reduce Davis's lead to one frame at 8–7. Davis narrowly won frame 16 with a break of 63, then won the next after needing his opponent to make foul shots to win 10–7.[34]

Stephen Hendry met veteran player Willie Thorne. Hendry led 5–4 at the end of their first session and then took the first four frames in the second, before Thorne won three in-a-row. Hendry then took the 17th frame to achieve a 10–7 win.[35] At age 18 years and 97 days, Stephen Hendry became the youngest-ever player to win a match at the Crucible,[36] Steve Longworth led 5–4 after the first session of his match, and won five successive frames to beat Kirk Stevens 10–5.[35] Terry Griffiths also progressed from a 5–4 interval lead to a 10–4 win, against Jim Wych.[35] Alex Higgins, due to start a six-month ban after the Championship, beat first-year professional Jon Wright 10–6.[35] Murdo MacLeod defeated Rex Williams 10–5, despite Williams making the highest break of the first round, a 112.[37][38] The win made MacLeod the first Scottish player to win a match at the Crucible Theatre.[39]

Jimmy White led Dean Reynolds 5–4 at the end of their first session. Reynolds won the first two frames of the second session both on respotted blacks, before White went on to win 10–8.[40] O'Kane won nine frames in a row going from 1–5 behind against second-ranked player Cliff Thorburn to win 10–5.[21] Six-time champion Ray Reardon beat debutant Barry West 10–5.[41] Fourth seed Tony Knowles lost 6–10 to Mike Hallett, having led 6–5, and 11th seed Tony Meo lost 8–10 to John Parrott.[40]

Silvino Francisco and John Campbell played only eight of their scheduled nine frames in the first session, due to slow play, with Francisco leading 5–3 when they started the following session. Franciso won five consecutive frames at the start of the second session to complete a 10–3 win.[42] Doug Mountjoy led David Taylor 6–3 after their first session, and won 10–6.[42] The 1985 Champion Dennis Taylor led Bennett 8–1 before winning 10–4.[43] Neal Foulds led John Virgo 7–2 after their first session and won 10–4.[42]

Second Round[edit]

The second round was played from 23 to 27 April with matches as the best-of-25 held over three sessions.[44] Joe Johnson led Murdo MacLeod 6–2 and 9–4 after the first two sessions, winning 13–7.[45] Alex Higgins led Terry Griffiths 6–3 after the first session but Griffiths won four frames in a row and were tied at 8–8. Griffiths went on to defeat Higgins 13–10.[37][45] Six-times winner of the event, Ray Reardon led 3–1 but lost 12 of the next 13 frames to lose 4–13 to Steve Davis.[41][43][46] After the tournament, Reardon dropped out of the top 16 in the end-of-season world rankings, moving down from 15 to 38.[47]

Jimmy White made a break of 114 in his match against John Parrott, the highest in that year's championship to that point, and won 13–11. Five of the frames had been decided on the black, with White winning four of them.[37][48][49] Steve Longworth and Stephen Hendry were level at 4–4 at the end of their first session, Hendry going on to win 13–7.[13][45] O'Kane, ranked 39th, beat another top 16 player with a 13–5 victory over Mountjoy.[50] Foulds led Taylor 5-3 after their first session,[51] and won the match 13–10.[49] Francisco and Hallett were at 8-8 after their second session. Hallett then won three frames in a row, with breaks of 84, 47, 35 and 93. He also won the 20th frame, after requiring foul shots from Francisco, to lead 12–8, and clinched victory at 13–9 to reach his first world championship quarter-final.[52]

Quarter-finals[edit]

Neal Foulds (pictured in 2015) reached the semi-finals for the only time in his career by defeating Mike Hallett 13–9

The quarter-final matches were also played as the best-of-25 frames over three sessions, on 28 and 29 April.[53][54] Joe Johnson led Stephen Hendry 8–1 and 12–8, before Hendry won four frames in-a-row to take the match to a deciding frame at 12–12. Johnson made a break of 46 and after Hendry failed in an attempt to pot a red Johnson took the frame and match 13–12.[21][53][54] Hallett made two century breaks in the first session of his match against Foulds, who also compiled a century break, with their first session ending at 4–4.[55] Foulds then opened up a lead, leading 10–6 and 12–7 before winning at 13–9.[56]

Davis was 4–3 ahead of Griffiths after their first session, and 10–5 ahead by the end of the second. He wrapped up a 13–5 win and with breaks of 62, 86 and 51 in three frames in the final session.[55][56] Jimmy White won all of the frames in the first session in his match against Dene O'Kane, and led 9–0. White saw out the match to win 13–6.[13][53][57]

Semi-finals[edit]

The semi-final matches were played as the best-of-31 frames, held over four sessions, from 30 April to 2 May.[58] Joe Johnson met Neal Foulds in the first semi-final.[21] The pair were tied at 3–3, but Foulds missed a pot on the black ball in frame 7; allowing Johnson to take a one-frame lead after the first session.[59] In frame eight, Foulds made a break of 48 to win the frame, and won frame nine, despite requiring foul shots. Johnson made breaks of 47 in each of the next two frames to lead 6–5.[60] Foulds took the next before Johnson, with his fourth break of 47 in four frames, took the lead again. Foulds won the last frame of the session with a break of 45 to leave them all square at 7–7 after two sessions, and made a break of 114 in the 15th frame to go one ahead before Johnson won seven frames in a row to lead 14–8.[59][60][61] After this, Foulds won frame 23, but Johnson won the next two frames to win the match 16–9 to reach his second final.[39]

Davis and White had been level at 4–4 after their first session, with Davis winning the first four of their second session to lead 8–4 and finishing that session 9–6 ahead.[60][61] In the first frame of the third session, White was on course to make a maximum break, having potted ten reds and nine blacks, but missed the tenth black. After this, Davis required White to make foul shots in order to gain the necessary penalty points from them for Davis to win the frame. Aided by a fluked black, and by a free ball following a foul by White, Davis eventually won the frame by one point. John Hennessey in Pot Black magazine wrote that "at that moment White lost the chance of claiming his first world title," adding that White's father later said that losing the frame affected White badly during the following three.[62] However, White later compiled a 119 break, the new highest in the competition, overtaking his earlier 114 in the second round, and ended the third session 9–13 behind. Davis won the match 16–11.[63]

Final[edit]

Steve Davis about to play a shot
Steve Davis won his fourth world championship, defeating Joe Johnson 18–14

The final was played as a best-of-35 frames match held over four sessions between Steve Davis and Joe Johnson on 3 and 4 May 1987.[64][65] It was the first time that the same two players had met in the final at the Crucible for the second year in a row.[66] The last time that two players had met in consecutive finals at the World Championship was when Fred Davis and Walter Donaldson had both reached the final from 1947 to 1951, five years in a row. The next time it would happen was when Stephen Hendry and Jimmy White met in three consecutive finals between 1992 and 1994.[66][67] This is also the only time that the final has been contested by the top two seeds of the tournament.[68] The final was refereed by Len Ganley.[69]

In frame one, Davis compiled a 127 break, the highest of the tournament.[18] Johnson responded winning three frames in a row with Davis doing the same. This left Davis 4–3 ahead at the end of the first session.[21] He extended his lead to 6–4 at the start of the second session which finished with him leading 9–7. With the frame scores at 8–5 to Davis, Johnson was behind in the 14th frame but won it with a break of 73. The last two frames of the session were both won witt the aid of fluked reds: the 15th frame by Davis, and the last of the day by Johnson.[21][64] On the second day, Johnson won the first frame of the third session to reduce Davis' lead to one frame. Davis then took four consecutive frames to lead 13–8, but missed the last red ball when on a break of 52. Johnson then cleared up to the black, which Davis would have required to level the scores in the frame. However, Davis left the black in a position that it could be potted from, and Johnson won the frame.[64] Davis won the next frame, to lead 14–9 at the end of the third session.[21]

Johnson made a break of 52 in the first frame of the fourth session, but failed on an attempt to pot a red, which gave Davis an opportunity. Davis then made a break of 35, but left an easy green for Johnson, who cleared to the pink to win. In the next frame, Johnson made a break of 62, and then Davis attempted a clearance, but missed the yellow ball. Johnson potted the yellow from distance and cleared to the blue, with Davis then conceding the frame. Johnson led 50–0 in the next frame, and with both players making a number of errors during the frame, Davis left him an easy brown that allowed Johnson in to win his fourth consecutive frame to move to within one frame at 13–14.[21][39] Davis had breaks of 64 and 40 to lead 15–13, a break of 73 to help make it 16–13, and won on the colours to make it 17–13. Johnson won another frame, with a break of 67, before Davis clinched victory with a break of 73 to make it 18–14, achieving his fourth World Championship title.[21][64][65]

It had been reported during the tournament that both Foulds and WPBSA chairman Williams were taking beta blockers. These were banned under International Olympic Committee rules, but not prohibited in snooker.[70] Colin Moynihan, a Member of the British Parliament, called for Williams to resign and any players using beta blockers to withdraw from competing.[71]

Main draw[edit]

Shown below are the results for the tournament. The numbers in brackets denote players seedings, whilst players in bold are match winners.[17][16][72]

First round Second round Quarter-finals Semi-finals
Best of 19 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 31 frames
                           
18 April            
  Joe Johnson (ENG) (1)  10
23 & 24 April
  Eugene Hughes (IRL)  9  
 England Joe Johnson (1)  13
18 & 19 April
   Scotland Murdo MacLeod  7  
  Rex Williams (ENG) (16)  5
28 & 29 April
  Murdo MacLeod (SCO)  10  
 England Joe Johnson (1)  13
19 & 20 April
   Scotland Stephen Hendry  12  
  Kirk Stevens (CAN) (9)  4
24 & 25 April
  Steve Longworth (ENG)  10  
 England Steve Longworth  7
19 & 20 April
   Scotland Stephen Hendry  13  
  Willie Thorne (ENG) (8)  7
30 April 1 & 2 May
  Stephen Hendry (SCO)  10  
 England Joe Johnson (1)  16
20 & 21 April
   England Neal Foulds (13)  9
  Tony Knowles (ENG) (5)  6
25, 26 & 27 April
  Mike Hallett (ENG)  10  
 England Mike Hallett  13
21 & 22 April
   South Africa Silvino Francisco (12)  9  
  Silvino Francisco (RSA) (12)  10
28 & 29 April
  John Campbell (AUS)  3  
 England Mike Hallett  9
21 & 22 April
   England Neal Foulds (13)  13  
  Neal Foulds (ENG) (13)  10
26 & 27 April
  John Virgo (ENG)  4  
 England Neal Foulds (13)  13
22 & 23 April
   Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor (4)  10  
  Dennis Taylor (NIR) (4)  10
  Mark Bennett (WAL)  4  
22 & 23 April            
  Cliff Thorburn (CAN) (3)  5
26 & 27 April
  Dene O'Kane (NZL)  10  
 New Zealand Dene O'Kane  13
22 April
   Wales Doug Mountjoy (14)  5  
  Doug Mountjoy (WAL) (14)  10
28 & 29 April
  David Taylor (ENG)  5  
 New Zealand Dene O'Kane  6
21 April
   England Jimmy White (6)  13  
  Tony Meo (ENG) (11)  8
25, 26 & 27 April
  John Parrott (ENG)  10  
 England John Parrott  11
20 & 21 April
   England Jimmy White (6)  13  
  Jimmy White (ENG) (6)  10
30 April 1 & 2 May
  Dean Reynolds (ENG)  8  
 England Jimmy White (6)  11
19 & 20 April
   England Steve Davis (2)  16
  Alex Higgins (NIR) (7)  10
24 & 25 April
  Jon Wright (ENG)  6  
 Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (7)  10
19 & 20 April
   Wales Terry Griffiths (10)  13  
  Terry Griffiths (WAL) (10)  10
28 & 29 April
  Jim Wych (CAN)  4  
 Wales Terry Griffiths (10)  5
18 & 19 April
   England Steve Davis (2)  13  
  Ray Reardon (WAL) (15)  10
23, 24 & 25 April
  Barry West (ENG)  5  
 Wales Ray Reardon (15)  4
18 April
   England Steve Davis (2)  13  
  Steve Davis (ENG) (2)  10
  Warren King (AUS)  7  
Final (Best of 35 frames) Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, 3 & 4 May 1987. Referee: Len Ganley
Joe Johnson (1)
 England
14–18 Steve Davis (2)
 England
0–128, 61–53, 74–69, 71–2, 1–77, 12–83, 66–57, 8–69, 35–82, 5–79, 118–15, 25–77, 0–91, 76–44, 7–88, 70–6, 68–34, 0–69, 0–80, 24–81, 24–68, 66–52, 0–77, 75–22, 70–53, 76–44, 73–59, 0–104, 6–113, 33–91, 77–34, 0–78 Century breaks: 2 (Johnson 1, Davis 1)

Highest break by Johnson: 101
Highest break by Davis: 127

0–128, 61–53, 74–69, 71–2, 1–77, 12–83, 66–57, 8–69, 35–82, 5–79, 118–15, 25–77, 0–91, 76–44, 7–88, 70–6, 68–34, 0–69, 0–80, 24–81, 24–68, 66–52, 0–77, 75–22, 70–53, 76–44, 73–59, 0–104, 6–113, 33–91, 77–34, 0–78
England Steve Davis wins the 1987 Embassy World Snooker Championship

Qualifying[edit]

[73][74]

  Round 1
Best of 19 frames
Round 2
Best of 19 frames
Round 3
Best of 19 frames
Round 4
Best of 19 frames
                             
 Jim Bear (CAN) 10    Marcel Gauvreau (CAN) 10
 Jackie Rea (NIR) 5    Jim Bear (CAN) 3      Marcel Gauvreau (CAN) 3      Eugene Hughes (IRE) 10
 Frank Jonik (CAN)    Paul Medati (ENG) 10    Paul Medati (ENG) 10      Paul Medati (ENG) 2
 Tony Kearney (IRE) w.o.    Tony Kearney (IRE) 8
 Eddie Sinclair (SCO)    Tony Drago (MLT) 9
Bye    Eddie Sinclair (SCO) 10      Eddie Sinclair (SCO) 6      Murdo MacLeod (SCO) 10
 Mike Watterson (ENG) 2    Ray Edmonds (ENG) 10    Ray Edmonds (ENG) 10      Ray Edmonds (ENG) 7
 Steve James (ENG) 10    Steve James (ENG) 1
 Greg Jenkins (AUS) 10    Tommy Murphy (NIR) 10
 Robbie Grace (RSA) 9    Greg Jenkins (AUS) 4      Tommy Murphy (NIR) 10      Steve Longworth (ENG) 10
 Paul Thornley (CAN) 6    Graham Miles (ENG) 10    Graham Miles (ENG) 7      Tommy Murphy (NIR) 2
 David Greaves (ENG) 10    David Greaves (ENG) 7
 Mike Darrington (ENG) 10    Stephen Hendry (SCO) 10
 Bert Demarco (SCO) 6    Mike Darrington (ENG) 7      Stephen Hendry (SCO) 10      Dave Martin (ENG) 7
 Martin Smith (ENG) 9    John Rea (SCO) 9    Jim Rempe (USA) 4      Stephen Hendry (SCO) 10
 Jim Rempe (USA) 10    Jim Rempe (USA) 10
 Gino Rigitano (CAN) 10    Vic Harris (ENG) 6
 Paddy Morgan (AUS) 0    Gino Rigitano (CAN) 10      Gino Rigitano (CAN) 4      Mike Hallett (ENG) 10
 Les Dodd (ENG)    Steve Newbury (WAL) 10    Steve Newbury (WAL) 10      Steve Newbury (WAL) 4
Bye    Les Dodd (ENG) 7
 Colin Roscoe (WAL) 10    Steve Duggan (ENG) 10
 Terry Whitthread (ENG) 2    Colin Roscoe (WAL) 7      Steve Duggan (ENG) 3      John Campbell (AUS) 10
 Mario Morra (CAN) 10    Tony Chappel (WAL) 10    Tony Chappel (WAL) 10      Tony Chappel (WAL) 6
 Paul Gibson (ENG) 6    Mario Morra (CAN) 8
 Eddie McLauglin (SCO)    Tony Jones (ENG) 10
 Dave Chalmers (ENG) w.o.    Dave Chalmers (ENG) 1      Tony Jones (ENG) 10      John Virgo (ENG) 10
 Jack McLaughlin (NIR)    Jimmy van Rensberg (RSA) 10    Jimmy van Rensberg (RSA) 0      Tony Jones (ENG) 9
Bye    Jack McLaughlin (NIR) 6
 John Hargreaves (ENG) 6    Bernie Mikkelen (CAN) 4
 Mark Bennett (WAL) 10    Mark Bennett (WAL) 10      Mark Bennett (WAL) 10      Bill Werbeniuk (CAN) 8
 Jim Donnelly (SCO)    Wayne Jones (WAL) 10    Wayne Jones (WAL) 3      Mark Bennett (WAL) 10
Bye    Jim Donnelly (SCO) 3
 Ian Williamson (ENG)    Ian Black (SCO) 10
Bye    Ian Williamson (ENG) 8      Ian Black (SCO) 2      Peter Francisco (RSA) 5
 Dave Gilbert (ENG)    Dene O'Kane (NZL) 10    Dene O'Kane (NZL) 10      Dene O'Kane (ENG) 10
Bye    Dave Gilbert (ENG) 2
 Billy Kelly (IRE) 10    Matt Gibson (SCO) 10
 Bernard Bennett (ENG) 0    Billy Kelly (IRE) 9      Matt Gibson (SCO) 4      David Taylor (ENG) 10
 Jim Meadowcroft (ENG) 10    Graham Cripsey (ENG) 10    Graham Cripsey (ENG) 10      Graham Cripsey (ENG) 7
 Derek Mienie (RSA) 3    Jim Meadowcroft (ENG) 9
 Geoff Foulds (ENG) 10    Danny Fowler (ENG) 10
 Paul Watchorn (IRE) 6    Geoff Foulds (ENG) 6      Danny Fowler (ENG) 10      John Parrott (ENG) 10
 Dennis Hughes (ENG) 10    Bob Harris (ENG) 10    Bob Harris (ENG) 5      Danny Fowler (ENG) 3
 Maurice Parkin (ENG) 5    Dennis Hughes (ENG) 2
 Bill Oliver (ENG) 10    Patsy Fagan (IRE) 2
 Pascal Burke (IRE) 5    Bill Oliver (ENG) 10      Bill Oliver (ENG) 10      Dean Reynolds (ENG) 10
 John Dunning (ENG) 10    George Scott (ENG) 10    George Scott (ENG) 5      Bill Oliver (ENG) 7
 Joe Cagianello (CAN) 7    John Dunning (ENG) 7
 Robby Foldvari (AUS)    Mark Wildman (ENG) 10
Bye    Robby Foldvari (AUS) 5      Mark Wildman (ENG) 0      Cliff Wilson (WAL) 4
 Pat Houlihan (ENG) 4    Paddy Browne (IRE) 6    Jon Wright (ENG) 10      Jon Wright (ENG) 10
 Jon Wright (ENG) 10    Jon Wright (ENG) 10
 Sakchai Sim Ngam (THA)    Malcolm Bradley (ENG) 10
 Brian Rowswell (ENG) w.o.    Brian Rowswell (ENG) 6      Malcolm Bradley (ENG) 10      Jim Wych (CAN) 10
 Dessie Sheehan (IRE) 6    Joe O'Boye (IRE) 10    Joe O'Boye (IRE) 7      Malcolm Bradley (ENG) 7
 Nigel Gilbert (ENG) 10    Nigel Gilbert (ENG) 5
 Roger Bales (ENG)    John Spencer (ENG) 10
Bye    Roger Bales (ENG) 2      John Spencer (ENG) 10      Barry West (ENG) 10
 Jack Fitzmaurice (ENG) 10    Bob Chaperon (CAN) 10    Bob Chaperon (CAN) 4      John Spencer (ENG) 5
 Clive Everton (WAL) 2    Jack Fitzmaurice (ENG) 2
 David Roe (ENG) w.o.    Warren King (AUS) 10
 Omprakesh Agrawal (IND)    David Roe (ENG) 4      Warren King (AUS) 10      Eddie Charlton (AUS) 4
 Mick Fisher (ENG) 5    Fred Davis (ENG) 5    Ken Owers (ENG) 4      Warren King (AUS) 10
 Ken Owers (ENG) 10    Ken Owers (ENG) 10

Century breaks[edit]

There were 18 century breaks at the championship. The highest of which being a 127 made by Steve Davis.[18] This break was the lowest highest break recorded since the event moved to the Crucible Theatre.[75][76][77] A 132 made by Dene O'Kane was the highest break of the qualifying stages.[18]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The "modern era" of snooker is understood to have started in 1969, when the World Championship reverted to a knockout format.[4]
  2. ^ If the defending champion was ranked outside the top 16 in the world rankings as an automatic qualifier.[15]

References[edit]

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