1989 Cannes Film Festival

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1989 Cannes Film Festival
CFF89poster.jpg
Official poster of the 42nd Cannes Film Festival, featuring an original illustration by Ludovic.[1]
Opening film New York Stories
Closing film Old Gringo
Location Cannes, France
Founded 1946
Awards Palme d'Or (Sex, Lies,
and Videotape
)[2]
No. of films 22 (En Competition)[3]
19 (Un Certain Regard)
10 (Out of Competition)
10 (Short Film)
Festival date 11 May 1989 (1989-05-11) – 23 May 1989 (1989-05-23)
Website festival-cannes.com/en

The 42nd Cannes Film Festival was held from 11 to 23 May 1989. The Palme d'Or went to the Sex, Lies, and Videotape by Steven Soderbergh.[4][5][6][7]

The festival opened with New York Stories, anthology film directed by Woody Allen, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese[8] and closed with Old Gringo, directed by Luis Puenzo.[9][10]

During the 1989 festival, the first Cinéma & liberté forum was held with the participation of a hundred famous directors from many countries. They discussed about the freedom of expression and signed a declaration protesting against all forms of censorship still existing in the world.[11]

Juries[edit]

Wim Wenders, Jury President of the Main competition

Main competition[edit]

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1989 feature film competition:[12]

Camera d'Or[edit]

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1989 Camera d'Or:

  • Raf Vallone (actor) president
  • Bernard Jubard
  • Klaus Eder (journalist)
  • Moustafa Salah Hashem (journalist)
  • Peter Scarlet (cinephile)
  • Philippe Maarek (critic)
  • Suzanne Schiffman (screenwriter)
  • Yvan Gauthier (cinephile)

Official selection[edit]

In competition - Feature film[edit]

The following feature films competed for the Palme d'Or:[3]

Un Certain Regard[edit]

The following films were selected for the competition of Un Certain Regard:[3]

Films out of competition[edit]

The following films were selected to be screened out of competition.

Special screeninigs

Short film competition[edit]

The following short films competed for the Palme d'Or du court métrage:[3]

Parallel sections[edit]

International Critics' Week[edit]

The following feature films were screened for the 28th International Critics' Week (28e Semaine de la Critique):[14]

Feature film competition

Short film competition

  • Warszawa Koluszki by Jerzy Zalewski (Poland)
  • Le Porte plume by Marie-Christine Perrodin (France)
  • Blind Curve by Gary Markowitz (United States)
  • The Three Soldiers by Kamal Musale (Switzerland)
  • Work Experience by James Hendrie (U.K.)
  • Der Mensch mit den modernen Nerven by Bady Minck (Austria)
  • Trombone en coulisses by Hubert Toint (Belgium/France)
  • Wstega mobiusa by Lukasz Karwowski (Poland)
  • La Femme mariée de Nam Xuong by Tran Anh Hung (France)

Directors' Fortnight[edit]

The following feature films were screened for the 1989 Directors' Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalizateurs):[15]

Awards[edit]

Steven Soderbergh, Palme d'Or winner

Official awards[edit]

The following films and people received the 1989 awards:[2][16][17]

Golden Camera

Short films

Independent awards[edit]

FIPRESCI Prizes[19]

Commission Supérieure Technique

Ecumenical Jury[20]

Award of the Youth[18]

Other awards

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Posters 1989". Archived from the original on 14 December 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Awards 1989: All Awards". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Official Selection 1989: All the Selection". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 14 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "Americans Big Winners At Cannes Film Fest". sun-sentinel.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  5. ^ "A Low-budget American Film Soars At Cannes". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  6. ^ Canby, Vincent. "Critic's Notebook- For the Cannes Winner, Untarnished Celebrity". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  7. ^ "26-Year-Old American Director Takes To Award At Cannes". apnewsarchive.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  8. ^ "Cannes '89: The Glitter, The Hoopla, The Movies". articles.philly.com. Archived from the original on 18 December 2013. 
  9. ^ "Cannes Director Tries To `Lighten Up` This Year". sun-sentinel.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  10. ^ "U.S films to open Cannes". news.google.com (The Lewiston Journal). May 2, 1989. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  11. ^ "The History of the Festival / The 80s: The Modern Era". festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  12. ^ "All Juries 1989". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 15 April 2016. 
  13. ^ "A Cry in the Dark (1988) - Release dates". IMDb.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  14. ^ "28e Selecion de la Semaine de la Critique - 1989". archives.semainedelacritique.com. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 
  15. ^ "Quinzaine 1989". quinzaine-realisateurs.com. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 
  16. ^ "42ème Festival International du Film - Cannes". cinema-francais.fr (in French). Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  17. ^ "1989 - Le Jury, Les Prix". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  18. ^ a b c "Cannes Film Festival Awards for 1989". imdb.com. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  19. ^ "FIPRESCI Awards 1989". fipresci.org. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  20. ^ "Jury Œcuménique 1989". cannes.juryoecumenique.org. Retrieved 29 June 2017. 

Media[edit]

External links[edit]