1989 Masters Tournament

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1989 Masters Tournament
Tournament information
Dates April 6–9, 1989
Location Augusta, Georgia
Course(s) Augusta National Golf Club
Organized by Augusta National Golf Club
Tour(s) PGA Tour
Statistics
Par 72
Length 6,905 yards (6,314 m)[1]
Field 85 players, 52 after cut
Cut 151 (+7)
Prize fund $1,000,000
Winner's share $200,000
Champion
England Nick Faldo
283 (−5), playoff

The 1989 Masters Tournament was the 53rd Masters Tournament, held April 6–9 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia.

Nick Faldo won the first of his three Masters titles, the second of his six major championships. After a third round 77 (+5), he shot a final round 65 (−7) and won with a birdie on the second sudden-death playoff hole over Scott Hoch.[2] The 1989 Masters is remembered for Hoch missing a two-foot putt on the first playoff hole that would have won him the tournament.[1][3] Greg Norman continued his misfortunes at the Masters with a bogey on the 72nd hole to miss a playoff by a stroke, similar to 1986. Third round leader Ben Crenshaw also bogeyed the final hole to tie Norman for third.[4]

Faldo became the first from England to win the Masters and was the second consecutive winner from the United Kingdom. Defending champion Sandy Lyle of Scotland missed the cut by two strokes, but made history at the champions' dinner on Tuesday by sporting a kilt and serving haggis.[5]

Field[edit]

1. Masters champions

Tommy Aaron, George Archer, Seve Ballesteros (3,9,12), Gay Brewer, Billy Casper, Charles Coody, Ben Crenshaw (9,10,13), Raymond Floyd (2,9), Doug Ford, Bernhard Langer (9), Sandy Lyle (3,13), Larry Mize (10), Jack Nicklaus (9), Arnold Palmer, Gary Player, Craig Stadler (9), Tom Watson (3,9), Fuzzy Zoeller (2,9,10)

2. U.S. Open champions (last five years)

Andy North, Scott Simpson (10), Curtis Strange (9,12,13)

3. The Open champions (last five years)

Nick Faldo (10,11), Greg Norman (9,12,13)

4. PGA champions (last five years)

Hubert Green (9), Larry Nelson (12,13), Jeff Sluman (12,13), Lee Trevino, Bob Tway (13)

5. U.S. Amateur champion and runner-up

Eric Meeks (a), Danny Yates (a)

6. The Amateur champion

Christian Hardin (a)

7. U.S. Amateur Public Links champion

Ralph Howe III (a)

8. U.S. Mid-Amateur champion

David Eger (a)

9. Top 24 players and ties from the 1988 Masters Tournament

Chip Beck (12,13), Mark Calcavecchia (12,13), Chen Tze-chung, Fred Couples (10,13), David Frost (12,13), Mark McCumber (13), Mark McNulty, Dan Pohl (10,11,13), Don Pooley, Nick Price, Doug Tewell, Lanny Wadkins (10,12,13)

10. Top 16 players and ties from the 1988 U.S. Open

Paul Azinger (11,13), Andy Bean, Bob Gilder (11), Mark O'Meara (12,13), Steve Pate (13), Payne Stewart (13), D. A. Weibring

11. Top eight players and ties from 1988 PGA Championship

Tom Kite (12,13), Tommy Nakajima, Dave Rummells

12. Winners of PGA Tour events since the previous Masters

Jim Benepe, Mark Brooks, Bill Glasson (13), Ken Green (13), Morris Hatalsky, Steve Jones, Gary Koch (13), Bruce Lietzke (13), Bob Lohr, Andrew Magee, Blaine McCallister, Jodie Mudd (13), Corey Pavin, Tom Purtzer, Mike Reid (13), Gene Sauers, Tom Sieckmann, Tim Simpson, Joey Sindelar (13), Mike Sullivan, Greg Twiggs, Scott Verplank

13. Top 30 players from the 1988 PGA Tour money list

Jay Haas, Scott Hoch, Peter Jacobsen, Mark Wiebe

14. Special foreign invitation

José María Olazábal, Masashi Ozaki, Hal Sutton, Ian Woosnam

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Ben Crenshaw  United States 1984 71 72 70 71 284 −4 T3
Seve Ballesteros  Spain 1980, 1983 71 72 73 69 285 −3 5
Tom Watson  United States 1977, 1981 72 73 74 71 290 +2 T14
Jack Nicklaus  United States 1963, 1965, 1966,
1972, 1975, 1986
73 74 73 71 291 +3 T18
Bernhard Langer  West Germany 1985 74 75 71 73 293 +5 T26
Larry Mize  United States 1987 72 77 69 75 293 +5 T26
Fuzzy Zoeller  United States 1979 76 74 69 74 293 +5 T26
Tommy Aaron  United States 1973 76 74 72 76 298 +10 T38
Charles Coody  United States 1971 76 74 76 72 298 +10 T38
Raymond Floyd  United States 1976 76 75 73 74 298 +10 T38
George Archer  United States 1969 75 75 75 75 300 +12 T43

Source:[6]

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Billy Casper  United States 1970 75 78 153 +9
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1988 77 76 153 +9
Gary Player  South Africa 1961, 1974, 1978 76 77 153 +9
Craig Stadler  United States 1982 74 79 153 +9
Arnold Palmer  United States 1958, 1960,
1962, 1964
81 80 161 +17
Doug Ford  United States 1957 81 82 163 +19
Gay Brewer  United States 1967 83 WD

Source:[6]

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, April 6, 1989

Lee Trevino, vying for an elusive Masters title, shot an opening round 67 to lead Nick Faldo by one shot. Only 10 players broke par on day one, including 1984 champion Ben Crenshaw and 1980 and 1983 champion Seve Ballesteros. Defending champion Sandy Lyle birdied 18 to shoot a disappointing 77.[2]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Lee Trevino  United States 67 −5
2 Nick Faldo  England 68 −4
3 Scott Hoch  United States 69 −3
T4 Andy Bean  United States 70 −2
Don Pooley  United States
T6 Seve Ballesteros  Spain 71 −1
Chen Tze-chung  Taiwan
Ben Crenshaw  United States
Jumbo Ozaki  Japan
Tom Purtzer  United States

Second round[edit]

Friday, April 7, 1989

Lee Trevino and Nick Faldo, who both shot over par on the day, shared the lead after a difficult scoring day. Only four players broke par including Ken Green, who shot 69 and had the round of the day. Seve Ballesteros shot 72 even though he had a 4 putt on the 15th hole.[2]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Nick Faldo  England 68-73=141 −3
Lee Trevino  United States 67-74=141
T3 Seve Ballesteros  Spain 71-72=143 −1
Ben Crenshaw  United States 71-72=143
Ken Green  United States 74-69=143
Scott Hoch  United States 69-74=143
Mike Reid  United States 72-71=143
8 Tom Kite  United States 72-72=144 E
T9 Mark O'Meara  United States 74-71=145 +1
Curtis Strange  United States 74-71=145
Tom Watson  United States 72-73=145

Amateurs: Howe III (+12), Yates (+14), Eger (+18), Meeks (+18), Hardin (+26)

Third round[edit]

Saturday, April 8, 1989

Saturday was a long day that included a 90 minute delay and eventual suspension of play. Ben Crenshaw stormed to a 4 shot lead at the suspension of play. Crenshaw was 3 under on the day through 13. Nick Faldo got off to a slow start with a double bogey on the first hole. On the second hole Faldo holed an improbable 100 foot birdie putt, but was 3 over on the day through 12 holes. Out early, clubhouse leader Greg Norman posted a 68 to reach +1 and close within 5 shots of the lead when play was suspended. Lee Trevino, trying to complete the career Grand Slam, faded out of contention Saturday.[2]

Place Player Country Score To par Hole
1 Ben Crenshaw  United States 71-72-49=192 −4 13
T2 Nick Faldo  England 68-73-50=191 E 12
Scott Hoch  United States 69-74-53=196 13
Mike Reid  United States 72-71-53=196 13

Sunday, April 9, 1989

For the first time since 1984 the third round was completed on Sunday morning. Conditions were ideal, but overnight leader Ben Crenshaw was unable to take advantage as his four shot morning lead was cut to one by the end of the third round. Seve Ballesteros who was +3 at the suspension of play on Saturday birdied 14, 15 and 17 to get back to level par. Nick Faldo continued to struggle in the morning, playing his last 6 holes in +2, to fall 5 shots out of the lead at the end of the third round. First and second round leader Lee Trevino couldn't get any momentum in the morning and finally finished with an 81.[2]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Ben Crenshaw  United States 71-72-70=213 −3
T2 Scott Hoch  United States 69-74-71=214 −2
Mike Reid  United States 72-71-71=214
T4 Seve Ballesteros  Spain 71-72-73=216 E
Ken Green  United States 74-69-73=216
Tom Kite  United States 72-72-72=216
T7 Greg Norman  Australia 74-75-68=217 +1
Mark O'Meara  United States 74-71-72=217
T9 Nick Faldo  England 68-73-77=218 +2
Larry Mize  United States 72-77-69=218

Final round[edit]

Sunday, April 9, 1989

An exciting final round had six different players hold at least a share of the lead on the back nine. Nick Faldo, five shots back to start the round, birdied four of his first seven holes to post 32 on the front nine. Faldo continued his comeback with miraculous birdies on 16 and 17 to post 65 and hold the clubhouse lead at −5. In the round Faldo made eight birdies and just one bogey at the 11th hole. Mike Reid chipped in for birdie on the 12th hole to take sole possession of the lead for the first time in the tournament at −6. However, Reid missed a short putt for par on 14 and double-bogeyed 15 after hitting his approach into the water to fade to 6th place. Seve Ballesteros, who held the lead earlier in the day, was just one shot back on 16, but underhit his tee-shot into the water ending any chances of his third Masters title. Greg Norman stormed into contention with birdies on 9, 10, 13, 15, 16 and 17 to tie for the lead. Norman however was unable to get up and down from the front of the green on 18, making bogey and missing a playoff by one shot.

In the end it came down to the final pairing of Ben Crenshaw and Scott Hoch. Hoch birdied the 15th to take sole possession of the lead at −6, but missed a short par putt at 17 to drop back to −5. Crenshaw, three back of the lead after the 15th hole, birdied 16 and 17 to share the lead with Hoch heading to the final hole. Both players hit the fairway off the tee, and then Hoch hit his approach on the green after Crenshaw missed in the front greenside bunker. After Crenshaw chipped out to 12 feet (4 m), Hoch had 25 feet (8 m) for birdie and his first major championship. Hoch barely missed his birdie putt and was able to tap in for par, tying Faldo for the clubhouse lead. Crenshaw then had 12 feet to join a playoff with Faldo and Hoch, but missed.[2]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
T1 Nick Faldo  England 68-73-77-65=283 −5 Playoff
Scott Hoch  United States 69-74-71-69=283
T3 Ben Crenshaw  United States 71-72-70-71=284 −4 64,450
Greg Norman  Australia 74-75-68-67=284
5 Seve Ballesteros  Spain 71-72-73-69=285 −3 44,400
6 Mike Reid  United States 72-71-71-72=286 −2 40,000
7 Jodie Mudd  United States 73-76-72-66=287 −1 37,200
T8 Chip Beck  United States 74-76-70-68=288 E 32,200
José María Olazábal  Spain 77-73-70-68=288
Jeff Sluman  United States 74-72-74-68=288

Source:[6]

Scorecard[edit]

Final round

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 4
England Faldo +1 E E −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 −1 −2 −3 −3 −4 −5 −5
United States Hoch −2 −3 −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −5 −5
United States Crenshaw −3 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −3 −3 −3 −3 −4 −5 −4
Australia Norman E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 E −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −3 −4 −5 −4
Spain Ballesteros −1 −2 −2 −3 −4 −4 −4 −4 −5 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −4 −2 −2 −3
United States Reid −2 −3 −2 −2 −2 −3 −3 −4 −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −5 −3 −3 −3 −2

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par
Source:[4][7]

Playoff[edit]

Faldo and Hoch were in the 10th playoff in Masters history and the 4th to use the sudden death format. The first hole of the playoff was the 10th, where both players made par every day. Both players hit the fairway, but Faldo pushed his approach in the short right side bunker. Hoch then played it safe, hitting the front middle of the green, leaving an uphill birdie putt. After Faldo chipped out to 15 feet (5 m), Hoch had 25 feet (8 m) to win his first major championship. Hoch lagged his putt up to 2 feet, forcing Faldo to make his 15 footer for par. Faldo missed, but made his 4-foot comebacker for a bogey five. Hoch then had his third putt of the day to win the championship, but missed, then made the 4-foot comebacker to extend the playoff.

The next playoff hole was the 11th, which Faldo bogeyed all four times he played it during the week. After Faldo hit his approach to 25 feet, Hoch pushed his approach right of the green. Hoch chipped to six feet,[8] but Faldo now had a putt to win. Faldo made the 25-foot birdie putt for his second major championship and first Masters title.[2][9]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Nick Faldo  England 5-3 E 200,000
2 Scott Hoch  United States 5-x 120,000

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dorman, Larry (April 10, 1989). "Hoch's miss is Faldo's gain". Spokesman-Review. Knight-Ridder. p. D1. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Swift, E.M. (April 17, 1989). "Jolly Good Show". Sports Illustrated. p. 18. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  3. ^ Van Sickle, Gary (April 10, 1989). "Faldo becomes new master of Augusta". Milwaukee Journal. p. 1C. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Hyman, Mark (April 10, 1989). "Faldo does when others don't". Eugene Register-Guard. (from The Baltimore Sun). p. 1B. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  5. ^ Lader, Martin (April 8, 1989). "Lyle's reign as champion ends quietly". Schenectady Gazette. UPI. p. 20. 
  6. ^ a b c "1989 Masters". databasegolf.com. Retrieved May 6, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Historic leaderboards: 1989 Masters". Augusta.com. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Faldo wins Masters in playoff". The New York Times. April 10, 1989. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  9. ^ Harig, Bob (April 12, 2011). "1989 Masters: Nick Faldo wins in playoff". ESPN. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
1988 PGA Championship
Major Championships Succeeded by
1989 U.S. Open

Coordinates: 33°30′11″N 82°01′12″W / 33.503°N 82.020°W / 33.503; -82.020