1989 San Diego Chargers season

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1989 San Diego Chargers season
Head coachDan Henning
General managerSteve Ortmayer
OwnerAlex Spanos
Home fieldJack Murphy Stadium
Results
Record6–10
Division place5th AFC West
Playoff finishdid not qualify

The 1989 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 30th overall and the first season under head coach Dan Henning's.The team matched on their 6–10 record from 1988.

Personnel[edit]

Staff[edit]

1989 San Diego Chargers staff
Front office

Head coaches

Offensive coaches

Defensive coaches

Special teams coaches


Roster[edit]

1989 San Diego Chargers final roster
Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists


Practice squad



Rookies in italics
Active, Inactive, Practice squad

Regular season[edit]

After a falling out with Head Coach Mike Ditka, Jim McMahon was traded from the Chicago Bears to San Diego. He started 11 games for a dreadful 6–10 Chargers team in 1989. He went 4–7 in the games he started, though the team lost 4 of those games by a combined 11 points in spite of his spotty play at times. He only had 4 games over 200 yds, but had 389 yds against the Houston Oilers in a Week 2 loss. He also had a falling out with team players, management and Coach Dan Henning in his year with San Diego with his lackluster play and ego. He was benched for the final four games and finished the year with 2,132 yds, 10 TDs and 10 INTs. He was released and moved on to backup Randall Cunningham on the Philadelphia Eagles in 1990.

During the season, the Chargers started playing a non-disco cover version of their fight song, "San Diego Super Chargers".[1]

Schedule[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result Attendance
1 September 10, 1989 at Los Angeles Raiders L 40–14
40,237
2 September 17, 1989 Houston Oilers L 34–27
42,013
3 September 24, 1989 Kansas City Chiefs W 21–6
40,128
4 October 1, 1989 at Phoenix Cardinals W 24–13
44,201
5 October 8, 1989 at Denver Broncos L 16–10
75,222
6 October 15, 1989 Seattle Seahawks L 17–16
50,079
7 October 22, 1989 New York Giants L 20–13
48,566
8 October 29, 1989 at Seattle Seahawks L 10–7
59,691
9 November 5, 1989 Philadelphia Eagles W 20–17
47,019
10 November 12, 1989 Los Angeles Raiders W 14–12
59,151
11 November 19, 1989 at Pittsburgh Steelers L 20–17
44,203
12 November 26, 1989 at Indianapolis Colts L 10–6
58,822
13 December 3, 1989 New York Jets L 20–17
38,954
14 December 10, 1989 at Washington Redskins L 26–21
47,693
15 December 17, 1989 at Kansas City Chiefs W 20–13
40,623
16 December 24, 1989 Denver Broncos W 19–16
50,524

Standings[edit]

AFC West
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
Denver Broncos(1) 11 5 0 .688 6–2 9–3 362 226 L1
Kansas City Chiefs 8 7 1 .531 3–5 6–7–1 307 286 W1
Los Angeles Raiders 8 8 0 .500 3–5 6–6 315 297 L2
Seattle Seahawks 7 9 0 .438 4–4 7–5 241 327 L1
San Diego Chargers 6 10 0 .375 4–4 4–8 266 290 W2

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Leslie O'Neal, Pro Bowl Selection[2]
  • Lee Williams, Pro Bowl Selection[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stetz, Michael (January 13, 2007). "Still a superstar after 27 seasons". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved September 9, 2011. Ultimately, it was brought back, but with a more modern sound. The Chargers hired a local producer, Bo Donovan, to update the song in 1989.
  2. ^ a b 1989 NFL Pro Bowlers – Pro-Football-Reference.com